Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

139 Pages « < 9 10 11 12 13 > » Bottom

Outline · [ Standard ] · Linear+

> The Official Lowyat.NET Sintua Thread, A thread on Chinese folk religion.

views
     
sales.convenience
post Feb 4 2015, 05:14 PM

New Member
*
Junior Member
35 posts

Joined: Apr 2011
QUOTE(JunJun04035 @ Feb 4 2015, 10:50 AM)
中外 Inside China and outside china
五方 Five direction
唐蕃 China and places out of china
前后 Front and back

by all means is a chinese poetic way to state "all land"
*
very informative! Thanks for clarifying, cheers !
Joey Christensen
post Feb 4 2015, 09:32 PM

Purgamentum init, exit purgamentum
*******
Senior Member
3,592 posts

Joined: Jan 2009
From: Fort Canning Garden Status: Dog Fighting



Hi there! I've just made time to read your thread and the postings done here. Somewhere near my place, there's a big tree and under the tree, there's an altar. If not mistaken there's a rock in the small wooden altar.

Is it to pray for the "La Tok Kong"? I usually walk/drive past the area and sometimes I avoid walking near the altar. A bit creepy but I would like to know more. Would it be a good idea to snap a picture of the altar (to share)?

My late grandparents house has a very large altar and I notice there's a few three legged golden toads around on the altar. The weird thing is, when it's day time, the frogs are facing out from the house and when it's evening (about 6pm-ish) they will be turned around facing inward. laugh.gif

Out of curiousity, why toads? Any significant meaning? Oh, by the way, the golden toads got ancient Chinese coin in their mouth. laugh.gif

This post has been edited by Joey Christensen: Feb 5 2015, 12:43 AM
Deadlocks
post Feb 4 2015, 11:10 PM

n00b
*****
Senior Member
943 posts

Joined: Apr 2008
From: Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.


QUOTE(ABS2014 @ Jan 31 2015, 01:09 AM)
nice chinese christians have insidiously hijack the thread by asking seemingly-harmless questions to indirectly demean chinese religion and insinuate that chinese religions are backwards (while christianity are forward-thinking). can be seen from d.... and j.... post.
*
Nice non-Christians asked questions in the Christian Lounge thread, their questions addressed accordingly, and answered.

Nice Christians asked questions in the Sintua thread, their questions condemned.

Your biased logic?

And by the way, not all nice Christians are of Chinese descent. I believe that you should know this is also known as racism. I hope your faith in the Sintua folk religion can steer you back to the right path, because I'm afraid you might think I'm trying to force the Christianity religion down your throat or something.

This post has been edited by Deadlocks: Feb 4 2015, 11:12 PM
JunJun04035
post Feb 5 2015, 01:19 AM

Sir Kalahari, Duke of Autocorrect
******
Senior Member
1,166 posts

Joined: May 2009


QUOTE(Joey Christensen @ Feb 4 2015, 09:32 PM)
Hi there! I've just made time to read your thread and the postings done here. Somewhere near my place, there's a big tree and under the tree, there's an altar. If not mistaken there's a rock in the small wooden altar.

Is it to pray for the "La Tok Kong"? I usually walk/drive past the area and sometimes I avoid walking near the altar. A bit creepy but I would like to know more. Would it be a good idea to snap a picture of the altar (to share)?

My late grandparents house has a very large altar and I notice there's a few three legged golden toads around on the altar. The weird thing is, when it's day time, the frogs are facing out from the house and when it's evening (about 6pm-ish) they will be turned around facing inward. laugh.gif

Out of curiousity, why toads? Any significant meaning? Oh, by the way, the golden toads got ancient Chinese coin in their mouth. laugh.gif
*
That piece of rock should have wording on it, which read: 石敢当/泰山石敢当
This piece of rock is placed in strategic position to exorcise evil spirits or counter "fierce energy"凶气

That toad is a wealth symbolic creature where it is believe that they will bring wealth to the owner.
The turning is some sort of timed mechanic kot laugh.gif
Joey Christensen
post Feb 5 2015, 01:38 AM

Purgamentum init, exit purgamentum
*******
Senior Member
3,592 posts

Joined: Jan 2009
From: Fort Canning Garden Status: Dog Fighting



QUOTE(JunJun04035 @ Feb 5 2015, 01:19 AM)
That piece of rock should have wording on it, which read: 石敢当/泰山石敢当
This piece of rock is placed in strategic position to exorcise evil spirits or counter "fierce energy"凶气

That toad is a wealth symbolic creature where it is believe that they will bring wealth to the owner.
The turning is some sort of timed mechanic kot  laugh.gif
The altar is facing the road. I don't really read/write Mandarin but I think there's some writing and a red string/rope tied on the rock.

I think the turning is based on certain time. I was told not to touch anything on the altar when I was a small kid. laugh.gif

nachtsider

My ex-girlfriend's mum was a practitioner of trance (tiao tang - Hokkien) long ago, however, I believe she has stopped due to age/health problem. Is it possible to stop entirely?

In addition, I was told that her mum has the "third eye" gift/curse. She shared a lot of stories (when we were together) like her mum could see an old uncle with a child at the back of the alley of her house, a woman with long hair standing under a mango tree in front of her house...etc. She told me that her mum opted to pretending of not seeing these entities because afraid of "them" asking for favours to be done. Could this be even possible with the given gift/curse?

TSredisthcan
post Feb 5 2015, 03:35 AM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(Deadlocks @ Feb 4 2015, 11:04 PM)
I can understand how it will be called "folk" due to its lack of formal clergy and formal religious texts, but your claims on how it was sprung from folklore, legend and popular myth certainly didn't help to spur the hearts of skeptics, i.e, why would you use the words myth/folklore/legend to describe your religion, if not to solidify your faith towards it?
Because it is what it is, and I don't see the need to spur anyone's hearts.

You either accept it, or you don't. Whether or not you do is none of my beeswax. tongue.gif
TSredisthcan
post Feb 5 2015, 03:58 AM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(Joey Christensen @ Feb 4 2015, 09:32 PM)
Hi there! I've just made time to read your thread and the postings done here. Somewhere near my place, there's a big tree and under the tree, there's an altar. If not mistaken there's a rock in the small wooden altar.

Is it to pray for the "La Tok Kong"? I usually walk/drive past the area and sometimes I avoid walking near the altar. A bit creepy but I would like to know more. Would it be a good idea to snap a picture of the altar (to share)?
Hi Joey, Datuks, along with other nature spirits, often reside within rocks, trees and other natural structures. It was ancient practice to directly worship these structures rather than statues of their inhabitants; while statues are more in vogue these days, the old ways still persist in some places (see the photos below).

The last photo is especially interesting. Although there is a Datuk statue present, this is really to assuage people who might feel silly or strange about praying to a rock. The rock behind the statue is where the Datuk really resides. tongue.gif

Unless you have any means to request the Datuk's permission and confirm that he has granted you permission, I would not advise you to photograph the shrine, no. Datuks can be tetchy about this sort of thing.

user posted image

user posted image

user posted image

QUOTE(Joey Christensen @ Feb 5 2015, 01:38 AM)
My ex-girlfriend's mum was a practitioner of trance (tiao tang - Hokkien) long ago, however, I believe she has stopped due to age/health problem. Is it possible to stop entirely?

In addition, I was told that her mum has the "third eye" gift/curse. She shared a lot of stories (when we were together) like her mum could see an old uncle with a child at the back of the alley of her house, a woman with long hair standing under a mango tree in front of her house...etc. She told me that her mum opted to pretending of not seeing these entities because afraid of "them" asking for favours to be done. Could this be even possible with the given gift/curse?
The length of a medium's 'contract' depends on the seriousness of the karmic debt that their service as a medium serves to pay penance for. So yes, mediumship is not necessarily lifelong. Unfortunately, the nature of the job and its occupational hazards often results in damaged health, both physical and mental.

Unless you have a job description that explicitly states you must do so, you are not obliged to assist any otherworldly entities, even if you have the second sight. Furthermore, such entities are sometimes suffering for a good reason (e.g. serving a sentence for a crime).
yeeck
post Feb 5 2015, 11:00 AM

Look at all my stars!!
*******
Senior Member
2,618 posts

Joined: Apr 2006


OK, next questions from me. How to know which rock or tree or whatever has a spirit? How to determine which spirits are benevolent, and which are malevolent?

This post has been edited by yeeck: Feb 5 2015, 11:02 AM
TSredisthcan
post Feb 5 2015, 03:55 PM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(yeeck @ Feb 5 2015, 11:00 AM)
OK, next questions from me. How to know which rock or tree or whatever has a spirit? How to determine which spirits are benevolent, and which are malevolent?
This isn't something that a regular person can easily determine, unfortunately.
Joey Christensen
post Feb 5 2015, 05:16 PM

Purgamentum init, exit purgamentum
*******
Senior Member
3,592 posts

Joined: Jan 2009
From: Fort Canning Garden Status: Dog Fighting



QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 03:58 AM)
Unless you have any means to request the Datuk's permission and confirm that he has granted you permission, I would not advise you to photograph the shrine, no. Datuks can be tetchy about this sort of thing.

Unless you have a job description that explicitly states you must do so, you are not obliged to assist any otherworldly entities, even if you have the second sight. Furthermore, such entities are sometimes suffering for a good reason (e.g. serving a sentence for a crime).
Thanks for the enlightenment and thanks for the images provided too. An eye opener for me indeed because the usual Datuk's altar is rather small and usually placed near some trees or bushes. I do agree that it's a bit "risky" for me to snap a pic of the said altar. I was afraid that I might offend in some way or the other. Anyway, thank you again for sharing.

Given a chance, I would walk further from the altar. If not, I would just say something in my heart "I'm just walking past and I have no ill intention. Please excuse me."

I feel pity for the entities that her mum can see. Maybe the entities were left alone and needed some company or maybe they need some small favour. I somewhat feel pity for them. Maybe it's just me.

Another thing that ticks my fancy. Do you have any stories about the Chinese book (thick book with numbers and images in quadrants)? I'm very interested with that and perhaps if you have any stories pertaining the book, mind to share? I'm not sure what's it's called in English. laugh.gif
TSredisthcan
post Feb 5 2015, 06:14 PM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(Joey Christensen @ Feb 5 2015, 05:16 PM)
Thanks for the enlightenment and thanks for the images provided too. An eye opener for me indeed because the usual Datuk's altar is rather small and usually placed near some trees or bushes. I do agree that it's a bit "risky" for me to snap a pic of the said altar. I was afraid that I might offend in some way or the other. Anyway, thank you again for sharing.

Given a chance, I would walk further from the altar. If not, I would just say something in my heart "I'm just walking past and I have no ill intention. Please excuse me."
My usual course of action when passing a Datuk shrine is a polite bow and a subtle "Assalamualaikum, Datuk", "Apa khabar, Datuk" or "Cucu tumpang lalu, Datuk." It pleases them when you make an effort to talk their talk or abide by their customs.

Being in the vicinity of a Datuk shrine after consuming non-Halal items can be asking for trouble, by the way.

QUOTE(Joey Christensen @ Feb 5 2015, 05:16 PM)
Another thing that ticks my fancy. Do you have any stories about the Chinese book (thick book with numbers and images in quadrants)? I'm very interested with that and perhaps if you have any stories pertaining the book, mind to share? I'm not sure what's it's called in English. laugh.gif
Ah, you must mean almanacs. Those are astrology-related items, and I wouldn't really consider them within the scope of this thread. tongue.gif
yeeck
post Feb 5 2015, 06:40 PM

Look at all my stars!!
*******
Senior Member
2,618 posts

Joined: Apr 2006


QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 06:14 PM)
My usual course of action when passing a Datuk shrine is a polite bow and a subtle "Assalamualaikum, Datuk", "Apa khabar, Datuk" or "Cucu tumpang lalu, Datuk." It pleases them when you make an effort to talk their talk or abide by their customs.

Being in the vicinity of a Datuk shrine after consuming non-Halal items can be asking for trouble, by the way.
Ah, you must mean almanacs. Those are astrology-related items, and I wouldn't really consider them within the scope of this thread. tongue.gif
*
Interesting....how does a Datuk differ from Tudi Gong?
dp82
post Feb 5 2015, 07:21 PM

On my way
****
Senior Member
638 posts

Joined: Nov 2007
My cousin who has 3rd eye always c "datuk" running back to his "spot" when he sees him. N my cousin dare to say hi to him too...

If mortal can see them, would it b possible just to sit down n hav a chat wif him?
TSredisthcan
post Feb 5 2015, 08:11 PM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(yeeck @ Feb 5 2015, 06:40 PM)
Interesting....how does a Datuk differ from Tudi Gong?
Datuks are Malay nature spirits who function as the spiritual 'landlords' of Malay soil. A sizeable number of them are Muslim, and the appearances of their statues often reflect this fact. They can be strict and aggressive in nature, some being warriors. They are not found anywhere outside of the Malay Archipelago.

user posted image

Tu Di Gong/土地公 is the Chinese earth god. Legend has it that he was a man called Zhang Fu De/张福德 - the loyal old manservant of a rich family, who was renowned for his friendliness, humility and generosity. While out taking a stroll through the countryside with his master's small daughter one day, a blizzard began to rage. Wrapping the little girl up in his coat, he hurried home through the snow. The next morning, when the snow had subsided, he was found frozen to death just outside the grounds of his master's home; the child was safe and sound within his embrace, however. In light of his selflessness, Zhang was deified. He earned the title of Fu De Zheng Shen/福德正神 - the Righteous God of Prosperity and Virtue.

Tu Di Gong doubles as a god of wealth, in light of how the earth served as a source of wealth to the predominantly farming folk of days gone by. In his role as a god of wealth, he is known as Da Bo Gong/大伯公 (Tua Pek Gong in Hokkien). Whichever role he plays, he is consistently depicted as a rotund, good-natured and mild-mannered old man.

Tu Di Gong's statue wields a dragon-headed staff (this is a reference to an earlier Chinese earth deity known as the Earth Dragon, incorporated into Tu Di Gong worship as his pet) and is placed on the ground in accordance with his job scope (see first picture below). As Tua Pek Gong, his statue is placed off the ground, and holds a 'ru yi'/如意 sceptre, a symbol of good fortune, instead of a staff (see second picture below).

user posted image

user posted image
Joey Christensen
post Feb 6 2015, 10:00 AM

Purgamentum init, exit purgamentum
*******
Senior Member
3,592 posts

Joined: Jan 2009
From: Fort Canning Garden Status: Dog Fighting



QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 06:14 PM)
My usual course of action when passing a Datuk shrine is a polite bow and a subtle "Assalamualaikum, Datuk", "Apa khabar, Datuk" or "Cucu tumpang lalu, Datuk." It pleases them when you make an effort to talk their talk or abide by their customs.

Being in the vicinity of a Datuk shrine after consuming non-Halal items can be asking for trouble, by the way.
Ah, you must mean almanacs. Those are astrology-related items, and I wouldn't really consider them within the scope of this thread. tongue.gif
Thank you for the heads up. Ahhhhh...Yes, yes. Chinese almanac. I've always curious about it because there's numbers and images in it and I couldn't make a single clue out of it. laugh.gif I was once told by my mum that the older the Chinese almanac were kept, the more powerful they become. Some parents put it under their child's pillow/corner of the bed to ward of evil spirits or something.
epsilon_chinwk86
post Feb 6 2015, 10:54 AM

On my way
****
Senior Member
505 posts

Joined: Apr 2005
From: lulzland


QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 03:58 AM)

The length of a medium's 'contract' depends on the seriousness of the karmic debt that their service as a medium serves to pay penance for. So yes, mediumship is not necessarily lifelong. Unfortunately, the nature of the job and its occupational hazards often results in damaged health, both physical and mental.

Unless you have a job description that explicitly states you must do so, you are not obliged to assist any otherworldly entities, even if you have the second sight. Furthermore, such entities are sometimes suffering for a good reason (e.g. serving a sentence for a crime).
*
The master of my master came all the way here to Sarawak from Perak to be a medium to Guan Kong in 1 of the temple at the outskirt due to his debt to Guan Kong in his previous life. Only a few years though and I guess that means his debt is paid already.
TSredisthcan
post Feb 6 2015, 12:12 PM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(epsilon_chinwk86 @ Feb 6 2015, 10:54 AM)
The master of my master came all the way here to Sarawak from Perak to be a medium to Guan Kong in 1 of the temple at the outskirt due to his debt to Guan Kong in his previous life. Only a few years though and I guess that means his debt is paid already.
There we go. smile.gif

'Karmic debt' does not necessarily denote a debt of gratitude to a god, by the way, as in your master's master's case. It can also refer to the need to atone for sins committed during one's present existence or a previous existence. Someone who has committed numerous misdeeds would therefore have incurred a significant karmic debt.
Deadlocks
post Feb 6 2015, 12:44 PM

n00b
*****
Senior Member
943 posts

Joined: Apr 2008
From: Petaling Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.


QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 03:35 AM)
Because it is what it is, and I don't see the need to spur anyone's hearts.

You either accept it, or you don't. Whether or not you do is none of my beeswax. tongue.gif
*
Hmm. Excuse me but, wouldn't that means that you are proclaiming that the Sintua religion is the stuff of mythology, i.e. perhaps, necessarily as a myth? You do not necessarily have to spur anyone's heart, but I thought you're the person who can tell why would you, or anyone practices the faith of the Sintua folk religion.

This post has been edited by Deadlocks: Feb 6 2015, 01:00 PM
TSredisthcan
post Feb 6 2015, 02:03 PM

Casual
***
Junior Member
403 posts

Joined: Dec 2014
From: Klang
QUOTE(Deadlocks @ Feb 6 2015, 12:44 PM)
Hmm. Excuse me but, wouldn't that means that you are proclaiming that the Sintua religion is the stuff of mythology, i.e. perhaps, necessarily as a myth? You do not necessarily have to spur anyone's heart, but I thought you're the person who can tell why would you, or anyone practices the faith of the Sintua folk religion.
That's precisely what I mean, yes - the sintua faith has its roots in Chinese mythology.

I don't see how this relates with why I subscribe to said faith.
yeeck
post Feb 6 2015, 02:27 PM

Look at all my stars!!
*******
Senior Member
2,618 posts

Joined: Apr 2006


QUOTE(nachtsider @ Feb 5 2015, 08:11 PM)
Datuks are Malay nature spirits who function as the spiritual 'landlords' of Malay soil. A sizeable number of them are Muslim, and the appearances of their statues often reflect this fact. They can be strict and aggressive in nature, some being warriors. They are not found anywhere outside of the Malay Archipelago.
I was wondering, if they are really Muslim, wouldn't they be horrified to be worshiped in such a manner like other Chinese deities? hmm.gif

139 Pages « < 9 10 11 12 13 > » Top
 

Switch to:
| Lo-Fi Version
0.0380sec    1.79    6 queries    GZIP Disabled
Time is now: 12th November 2019 - 06:18 PM