Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

177 Pages  1 2 3 > » Bottom
Bump TopicClosed TopicRSS feed Start new topic Start Poll

Outline · [ Standard ] · Linear+

> So you're interested in ARCHITECTURE? Version 2, A guide to becoming an Architect. (Art & Design)

azarimy
post Jan 30 2008, 07:29 PM, updated 7 years ago
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


Disclaimer
Dear Readers,
Att:Mods,

I'm writing this guide as universal as possible so that anybody who's interested in pursuing this field can get a definitive idea of what to do, where to go and how. I will update this as frequent as possible. There have been several inquiries on studying architecture, so I wish I could redirect them to this topic. Although I'm attached to UTM, my intention is purely altruistic and to provide information as neutral as possible.

This is the second version of the thread. The information is updated to cater for the 2008 intake coming soon.





The Architecture Profession: A Brief Introduction

1.0 What is an Architect?

Architecture is one of the oldest profession in the world. An architect is a designer of buildings. They don't actually construct them, because they have builders working for them. Architects are the leader in the construction industry, usually second only to the client or developer. They don't just design buildings, architects also take into consideration the clients needs and requirements and protects their rights.



2.0 Governing Bodies
The architecture profession in Malaysia is protected by law. The regulating and governing body of the architecture profession in Malaysia is known as Lembaga Akitek Negara (LAM). They govern the entire profession starting from the definition of an architect under the Malaysian Constitution, licensing, practice, acts and enactments as well as education.

The other body that concerns the well being of architects themselves is Pertubuhan Akitek Malaysia. It functions as an association that takes care of its members, organize functions and manages the professional development of an architect from the lowest to highest qualification.



3.0. Practicing Architecture

Just like Bar exams for lawyers, architects also require certain level of qualification that is a standard worldwide. The qualifications are known as PAM Part 1, 2 and 3. The equivalent of this is RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects), AIA (American Institute of Architects) and RAIA (Royal Australian Institute of Architects).

user posted image

The diagram above shows the career path of an architect. After graduating with Part 2, a person is known as an architect, and will be able to practice according to the job specification of an architect. This should be the minimum target of anyone pursuing this profession. Anything less is a waste of time.

These qualifications can be obtained in two ways:
    i. Obtaining a fully accredited degree (or equivalent) that carries Part 1 or 2 equivalent.
    ii. Sitting for individual exams after obtaining a non-accredited degree for Part or 2.
Part 3 can only be obtained after practicing as an architect for a minimum of 2 years and fulfilling all the project requirements set by LAM. Fulfilling these needs, the architect will then submit themselves to a series of interviews and exams to determine that they are capable and absolutely qualified. These exams are conducted by PAM.

So how do one study to become an architect?



4.0. Common Paths to Studying Architecture

user posted image

BLUE - degrees that lead to LAM accredited Part 2 architecture.
GREEN - degrees that lead to LAM accredited Part 1 architecture.
YELLOW - degrees that in currently unaccredited by LAM, but is of Part 1 or 2 equivalent.
ORANGE - diplomas that are sub-Part 1.
GREY - pre-university certificates.
RED - LAM qualifications exams to be taken independently.


List of Abbreviations:

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


The diagram above illustrates, as simple as possible, the route to become an architect after SPM. There are several ways to do so, and it is totally up to a person. The choices are quite open, where students can generally study fulltime in Malaysia, partly in Malaysia+overseas, or fully overseas.

Each of the choices above have its own advantage and disadvantages. This I will elaborate further in the future. Most important factors are time and money. So the next question would be: where can you study architecture?



4.1. Schools, Accreditation and Level of Qualification

LAM in collaboration with Lembaga Akreditasi Negara (LAN) frequently assesses schools (once every 5 years) in order to maintain the standard of education for architecture. New schools will need to be assessed fully before given accreditation. As I've mentioned before, to obtain Part 1 and 2 qualifications, the diploma or degree must be accredited by LAM and LAN.

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


Schools not currently accredited usually have a partner or twinning programmes with other accredited universities. LUCT for example is partnering with Curtin University, which by the time a student graduates from Curtin, they will acquire a PAM part 2 equivalent qualification.

Important note: In architecture education, there are two bodies awarding recognition/accreditation: LAN/MQA and LAM. LAN/MQA is responsible in ensuring that the course offered complies to the standard of awarding an academic certificate (diploma, degree etc). Not having a LAN/MQA recognition simply means the school does not have high enough standard to award a single degree, let alone an architectural degree. LAM on the other hand monitors the quality of architecture education, ensuring that a degree produces qualified architect for practice. Not having LAM accreditation means the degree still has value, but not enough to become a legally licensed architects. However graduates still have the option to take LAM exams independently.


4.2. Accredited International Schools


Studying overseas is one of the recommended option to study architecture. It is advised that an architect to travel as much as they can, to understand other buildings, arts and cultures. I personally would recommend studying in Europe, as you can really benefit a lot from travel. Listed below are accredited schools by LAN & LAM, which upon graduation, you will be automatically awarded PAM part 2, an additional qualification apart from the given RIBA equivalent.

(Meaning if you graduated from these schools, you can work both overseas and in Malaysia.)

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



4.3. Common Paths after Finishing Part 1


user posted image

The diagram above illustrates common paths that most architecture students with Part 1 took after finishing up their first degrees. Yellow choices indicate academic paths, and blue choices indicate work/practice paths. It is also common that students choose to work for a year or two before continuing for their Part 2. Having work experience tremendously boosts their chances to land a place in a university, not to mention the advantage of experience they have over other students who went straight from Part 1.



5.0. Planning Your Studies

5.1. SPM Subject Relevance

Due to so many questions about what subject(s) to take during SPM that would be considered relevant to architecture, I've tabled out all the SPM subjects (not including vocational subject category) and explained more or less on its relevancy to architecture education.

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
    Legend

    i. Subject - Subjects that have been categorized according to its similar contribution towards architecture education.
    ii. Category - Keywords of relevant knowledge or skills that is attributed to the subject in architecture education.
    iii. Description - A brief description on what the subject could contribute when studying architecture.
    iv. Relevance - The value of taking that particular subject in relation to learning architecture.
This table is not to be confused with the intake requirement for any university. This list compiles the relevance of the subjects according to the typical architecture curriculum. Meaning, not taking a "Very Relevant" subject does not put you at a disadvantage when applying for architecture compared to those taking it.

The other reason for this table is to demystify the common misconception that students need Math, AddMath, Physics and Arts in architecture, where in actual fact, those requirements are only needed when applying for the course. The purpose of this table is to provide general knowledge so anyone who just finished PMR could decide which subject they want to take for SPM in order to benefit the most during architecture education.



Updated :
(4 Jan) List of LAM Accredited International Schools
(4 Jan) Updated diagram 4.0 to include Taylor's and LUCT paths
(4 Jan) Inserted spoiler tags to keep everything tidy
(26 Jan) Inserted item 4.3: Common paths after finishing part 1
(2 Feb) Added section 5.0. Planning Your Studies
(2 Feb) Inserted diagram 5.1.
(23 Mar) Updated diagram 4.0.
(17 Dec) Updated the accreditation list
(30 Jan 08) Updated diagram 4.0 with new information and format
(30 Jan 08) Updated diagram 5.1. with new relevancy
(30 Jan 08) Inserted Architectural FAQs
(30 Jan 08) Started Version 2 of the discussions
(2 Feb 08) Updated diagram 4.0. to include Kolej Negeri, Kolej Shahputra, ITP YPJ and UCI
(2 Feb 08) Added abbreviation guide
(20 Oct 08) Added UPM into the list of LAM Part 1 Accredited Schools
(5 Apr 09) Updated diagram 4.0 with new information and format
(5 Apr 09) Added UPM and UIAM into the list of LAM Part 2 Accredited Schools
(5 Jan 10) Updated some details

This post has been edited by azarimy: Apr 20 2010, 06:33 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Jan 30 2008, 07:36 PM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


Architecture FAQs


1.0. Planning Towards Architecture as a Profession


1.1. Planning your route to architecture

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.2. Where to study?

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.3. Switching to architecture


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.4. Financing your studies


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.5. Accreditation, Recognition and Qualification Issues


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.6. Applying to a school of architecture


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



1.7. School specific questions

Several information in this part is not complete. It will be completed later


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


This post has been edited by azarimy: Jan 30 2008, 08:03 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Jan 30 2008, 07:49 PM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


2.0. Architecture Education


2.1. Studying architecture


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



2.2. Subjects and topics offered


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



2.3. Skills and abilities


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



2.4. Computing in architecture education


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



2.5. References on architecture education


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



2.6. University life in Malaysia


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


This post has been edited by azarimy: Jan 30 2008, 07:55 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Jan 30 2008, 07:57 PM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


3.0. POST ARCHITECTURE EDUCATION


3.1. Prospects after studies


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «



3.2. About the profession and industry


» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 2 2008, 08:20 PM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
What will Architecture be like as a profession? (What will an Architect be doing?)

An example scenario of an Architect on the job will be ideal. (What would you be doing in the office, and what would be your assignments, etc...as such.)

Thanks a lot in advance. (In addition, thanks a lot for the informations provided in this thread as well.)

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 2 2008, 08:25 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Feb 2 2008, 09:27 PM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


good questions. will be added into the FAQ later on. for the time being, let me answer them first.

QUOTE(Benjamin911 @ Feb 2 2008, 12:20 PM)
What will Architecture be like as a profession? (What will an Architect be doing?)


this has been outlined in item 3.0. in the 1st post. to detail out:

user posted image

ur question is actually quite huge. it would help if u could narrow it down. however, to sum up simply, a part 2 and a part 3 architect generally do the same thing, but part 3 architects have the authority to endorse, engage and disengage a project, client, suppliers at will. well part 2 can do that too, if they're the boss.

QUOTE
An example scenario of an Architect on the job will be ideal. (What would you be doing in the office, and what would be your assignments, etc...as such.)

Thanks a lot in advance. (In addition, thanks a lot for the informations provided in this thread as well.)
*
it's hard to find a description that best describe the profession as an architect. one office may practice it entirely different from the next. one office could run a tough, militaristic, iron claw management of the practice; while another is a very casual, google like environment with lots of flirting around and relaxing. one architect might be PC bound as primarily a designer; while another jumps from local authorities to government departments to client meetings to manage and negotiate the business; and another may prefer sticking around construction sites supervising the construction of their brainchild. i know my boss never bothered about the design, he just talk cock to the client and with uncanny ability he will convince them that this is a good design. i dunno how he did it, i just design the stuff. he sold it.

a good architect is one who could have a multitude of abilities, from coming up with good ideas; good negotiation skills with clients, suppliers, contractors and authorities; to having strong presence and leadership skills in managing other designers and workers in the office. ofcourse, being able to do everything may mean that the office will be your new home, and u only go back to ur house maybe once a week.

will add to this later.


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 3 2008, 06:18 AM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
QUOTE
ur question is actually quite huge. it would help if u could narrow it down.
Basically, I would like to have more details about the Architect's job, or his assignments.

For example, what will the Architect need to do when up comes a need for a very important building to be constructed; but no one have any idea where to place the building, nor know how the building is going to look like, nor know about the facilities of the building, nor know any other physical details about the building; all they know is that, it is going to be a Hospital!

Without any drawings, plans, and models etc yet, with only the client's words that he wants a Hospital to be build, what will the Architect need to do from there onwards? (I am very interested to know!)

I am not sure whether will there be such a client in the real world, but lets imagine that he totally do not know anything at all then the fact that he wants a Hospital to be build. He would tell you; "I would need you to go and figure out the Hospital, where would be the best location for it, how will it look like, how much will it cost, how big will it have to be, and how many facilities will it need to have because I do not know anything about buildings and their construction processes at all; but I assume that you are the professional and trust you for the job! Anything else that is needed or required, you go and figure it out!" "I want the Hospital to be ready by the APRIL of next year; that would give you like 14 months for the completion of my Hospital from now. All the best to you!"

Lets imagine that the client left everything for you to do on your own, including leaving you to determine the budget for the project and the overall construction cost. You have to figure everything out about the Hospital yourself, including determining the number and type of professions needed for the job and to complete the job.

What will the Architect have to do from there onwards until the Hospital is ready to accept and house the patients? (Keeping in mind that at this stage, no one even knows how the Hospital is going to look like and be like yet.)

Lets get into the details if they are needed!

Thanks a lot in advance.

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 3 2008, 07:04 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Feb 3 2008, 09:10 AM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


i'm not sure to what depth i should explain here. but i'll try to be brief yet detailed.

a design project always start with the brief. the brief details out the idea, the intention, objective, approach, style and specific requirements. during education of an architect, the student will be eased in from first year to final year with a multitude of briefs.

in the 1st year, the brief is small, straight forward and often very prescriptive. it means the project is usually no bigger than a small house, a clear objective of what u need to do, and a detailed checklist of stuff that needs to be in it.

towards final year, especially thesis, the brief gets more subjective, analogues and very open. and usually during thesis itself, there is no brief given at all. u, as the next architect, is incharge of coming up with a brief and finally a full scheme all on ur own. u find ur own client, ur own site, ur own project - everything.

so addressing ur question...

usually a client will come to an architect with 3 things:
i. what he wants (objective, intention, scheme etc)
ii. where he wants it (location, site)
iii. how much he's got (the budget)

with these three, very basic things, an architect will be able to compose a detailed brief. this brief will be discussed with the clients, where an architect will convince the client that this is the best deal he can get with the money he's got. this stage is one of the initial stage of design, and usually without drawings. perhaps 1 or 2 sketches, but very minimal, just to hook the client to step into the first stage of design: conceptualization.

in this stage, the client will be required to fork out some money for the conceptualization fees. at this point, a whole scheme will be produced in presentation drawings. regardless whether the client engages in the project or not, this is a paid service. this stage can take as quickly as 2 weeks or as long as 2 years. some clients are very, very cerewet with their money, but hey, it's what this business is all about - the very best bang for the buck. and yes, an architect should be able to come up with a full scheme for a hospital from scratch in two weeks.

remember that an architect has a huge database of architectural design in his head as a result of the training. he can assemble and compose a new design at will, just like a kid could assemble a bunch of legos.

after the client agrees with the proposal, then it starts into the production stage where the working drawings are produced. with this, the QS, civil engineers, interior designers, landscape architects and local authorities came in. engineers will need to approve that the design can be built. QS needs to approve that the cost of the building is within the client's budget. landscape architect does the landscape, and ID do the interiors.

after all is approved, the architect will instruct the beginning of the next stage. at this point, the client will have to pay the next round of fees. appointed contractors will start construction as soon as the budget's in. at this point the architect, engineers and all involved will continuously inspect the construction until it's done.

once done, the local authorities will inspect it one last time. when satisfied, they will issue a CF (certificate of fitness), and people can move in immediately. at this stage the client settles the final fees.

that's roughly how it goes. i only have about 2 years worth of industrial experience, and i do tend spend most of my time on conceptual/ideation stage rather than construction bcoz that's my specialty. i can cook up designs from scratch overnight. so my boss gave me the time and space needed for me to work, and let other people take care the other stuff.



u stressed on an issue of an architect coming up stuff from scratch. if u've read enough books, observed enough designs and so on during education, u will build a vast architectural vocabulary that is unique and accessible only to u. this is very important, just as language vocabulary is as crucial to a writer. u can only use the same words a certain amount of time. or else, the book will get very boring and repetitive fairly quickly wink.gif.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Lon3LyJay
post Feb 3 2008, 06:26 PM
New Member
*
Group: Junior Member
Posts: 28

Joined: Nov 2007
wow... moved to version 2 already... congraz~

by the way, azarimy, the Architecture FAQs section 1.7 School specific questions, missing some questions haven't been answered yet? or 4gotten to replace the answer into it?
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Feb 3 2008, 07:43 PM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


QUOTE(Lon3LyJay @ Feb 3 2008, 10:26 AM)
wow... moved to version 2 already... congraz~

by the way, azarimy, the Architecture FAQs section 1.7 School specific questions, missing some questions haven't been answered yet? or 4gotten to replace the answer into it?
*
it's not been answered yet coz i dont know the answer. i'm still trying to get hold with those school's management, and will update it later on. if any of u knew the answer confidently, just pop the answer here and i'll update the info wink.gif.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 3 2008, 10:37 PM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
azarimy,

The life of an Architect certainly sounds interesting to me. smile.gif

BTW, I would like to ask whether designing maps for strategy games like Command & Conquer will be having any contribution to the Architecture learning curve and experience? I would like to ask this because I have been designing maps for a C&C strategy game. Currently, I am designing a big map involving many buildings, bridges, structures, roads, cities, bases, facilities, cliffs, and strategies. I just got the passion and inspiration for designing maps that are developed and established. However, I am very worried that I might be wasting the tenths of hours to weeks on map designing alone if it is not going to benefit me Architecturally in any sense. I have been spending many hours in each of the days of the last few weeks designing this present map of mine alone; which is admittedly, a very big one, and it is containing the most buildings, bridges, roads, cliffs, units, and strategies among all of my previous maps. (My computer also hung many times in the development of this current map.) There are also the separate challenges of making sure that the map can function and work well, or else everything would have been done in vain. (A beautiful map that cannot work, or function well; or a map that is very beautiful in the outlooks, but have poorly thought out designs, or contain bad planning.) Many a times, I had to compromise between nicer outlooks with poor functionality, or not as nice looking outlooks with better, or more efficient functionality. (I have been going for the latter due to my frustrations during game play with the not smart enough Artificial Intelligence.) They are MANY other problems...But, have I been wasting my time on all this? unsure.gif

Anyway, I always feel a sense of great achievement and satisfaction whenever I have completed a portion of the map! rclxm9.gif (The map is always in the never complete status though...either there would always be more ideas for me to add to it, or I would just have to go in again and alter this, alter that....sometimes it even involved massive revamp to accommodate new ideas, new thoughts...sometimes just to design something purely for the feeling or mood of it - which I could not feel in the previous designs.)

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 3 2008, 10:41 PM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
clayclws
post Feb 3 2008, 10:56 PM
Look at all my stars!!
*******
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 2,656

Joined: Sep 2006
From: Miri, PJ & KL


QUOTE(Benjamin911 @ Feb 3 2008, 10:37 PM)
azarimy,

The life of an Architect certainly sounds interesting to me. smile.gif

BTW, I would like to ask whether designing maps for strategy games like Command & Conquer will be having any contribution to the Architecture learning curve and experience? I would like to ask this because I have been designing maps for a C&C strategy game. Currently, I am designing a big map involving many buildings, bridges, structures, roads, cities, bases, facilities, cliffs, and strategies. I just got the passion and inspiration for designing maps that are developed and established. However, I am very worried that I might be wasting the tenths of hours to weeks on map designing alone if it is not going to benefit me Architecturally in any sense. I have been spending many hours in each of the days of the last few weeks designing this present map of mine alone; which is admittedly, a very big one, and it is containing the most buildings, bridges, roads, cliffs, units, and strategies among all of my previous maps. (My computer also hung many times in the development of this current map.) There are also the separate challenges of making sure that the map can function and work well, or else everything would have been done in vain. (A beautiful map that cannot work, or function well; or a map that is very beautiful in the outlooks, but have poorly thought out designs, or contain bad planning.) Many a times, I had to compromise between nicer outlooks with poor functionality, or not as nice looking outlooks with better, or more efficient functionality. (I have been going for the latter due to my frustrations during game play with the not smart enough Artificial Intelligence.) They are MANY other problems...But, have I been wasting my time on all this?  unsure.gif

Anyway, I always feel a sense of great achievement and satisfaction whenever I have completed a portion of the map!  rclxm9.gif (The map is always in the never complete status though...either there would always be more ideas for me to add to it, or I would just have to go in again and alter this, alter that....sometimes it even involved massive revamp to accommodate new ideas, new thoughts...sometimes just to design something purely for the feeling or mood of it - which I could not feel in the previous designs.)
*
Man, if you are into games, I suggest SimCity 4 at least...Now THAT, is city planning.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
azarimy
post Feb 4 2008, 12:18 AM
mister architect: the arrogant pr*ck
Group Icon
Education Essentials, Architecture
Group: Elite
Posts: 10,379

Joined: Jul 2005
From: shah alam - skudai - shah alam


i'm not too sure about designing C&C maps, but as far as i can see, C&C maps lack one very crucial thing in architecture: scale.

scale is very important in architecture, as it determines the relationship of one form or space to the other as well as its functionalities. when u talk about function and practicality of the maps, u're not talking about daily usage but about balancing gameplay. but ofcourse, it has its design elements as well, but it doesnt have the complexity of architecture. come to think of it, architecture is the most complex design of all in the first place.

what u have there is probably some good experience in the design process. design process is the process of exploration, testing, experimentation and purification and it goes round and round until u get the very best end product. if u think designing a C&C map is tough, wait till u had to juggle between budget, intention, site, engineering, function, form, outlook, environmental impacts and thousands other issues interlaced in architectural design. and these are real issues biggrin.gif.

during my masters, i did quite a number of virtual designs using VRML, C++ and a little bit of processing. we did a small counterstrike map, which was a little too realistic (bcoz all 7 of us were graduate architects and only 2 of us had any experience with CS). i would say maps for FPS carry more detail and depth compared to RTS maps.

scale is important in design, but alot of virtual stuff does not care about scale. but yeah, atleast u do got some experience in designing. that would count, although not directly.


User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 4 2008, 12:50 AM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
QUOTE(azarimy @ Feb 4 2008, 12:18 AM)
i'm not too sure about designing C&C maps, but as far as i can see, C&C maps lack one very crucial thing in architecture: scale.

scale is very important in architecture, as it determines the relationship of one form or space to the other as well as its functionalities. when u talk about function and practicality of the maps, u're not talking about daily usage but about balancing gameplay. but ofcourse, it has its design elements as well, but it doesnt have the complexity of architecture. come to think of it, architecture is the most complex design of all in the first place.

what u have there is probably some good experience in the design process. design process is the process of exploration, testing, experimentation and purification and it goes round and round until u get the very best end product. if u think designing a C&C map is tough, wait till u had to juggle between budget, intention, site, engineering, function, form, outlook, environmental impacts and thousands other issues interlaced in architectural design. and these are real issues biggrin.gif.

during my masters, i did quite a number of virtual designs using VRML, C++ and a little bit of processing. we did a small counterstrike map, which was a little too realistic (bcoz all 7 of us were graduate architects and only 2 of us had any experience with CS). i would say maps for FPS carry more detail and depth compared to RTS maps.

scale is important in design, but alot of virtual stuff does not care about scale. but yeah, atleast u do got some experience in designing. that would count, although not directly.
*
Alright, thanks a lot Azarimy! smile.gif

I am glad to know that I have not really been wasting my time designing those maps. (I really enjoy designing C&C Tiberian Sun Firestorm maps. I really enjoyed putting everything together in Harmony. I will continue to design and develop a great and interesting map. smile.gif)

BTW;

I will be going to the MPH bookstore tomorrow to get a book called;

Ecological Architecture - A Critical History by James Steele.

The book have the words Thames & Hudson printed on the bottom left corner.

If you have anything else to tell me, you are most welcome to.

Regards.

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 4 2008, 01:49 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
clayclws
post Feb 4 2008, 12:57 AM
Look at all my stars!!
*******
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 2,656

Joined: Sep 2006
From: Miri, PJ & KL


QUOTE(Benjamin911 @ Feb 4 2008, 12:50 AM)
Alright, thanks a lot Azarimy! smile.gif

I am glad to know that I have not really been wasting my time designing those maps.

BTW;

I will be going to the MPH bookstore tomorrow get a book called;

Ecological Architecture - A Critical History by James Steele.

The book have the words Thames & Hudson printed on the bottom left corner.

Regards.
*
James Steele...if you have the time, do come over to FBE, UM on the starting of every 1st semester. Steele is from USC and our 4th year have a co-op every year with USC, and Steele is their Prof that brings them (USC students, not UM) all over Asia and stop in UM for the co-op, which last roughly around 2 months. Can look him up for chit chat. Sometimes he gives talk and others can join.

Mind you, most Westerners have really good grasp of English and their talk is very "deep" within the architecture world. Most people can't appreciate because they can't muster the language well enough.


Added on February 4, 2008, 1:12 amBenjamin911, how far along into architecture are you?

Oh, and by the way, I realized that my institution always teach us the "legendary icons" of architecture first, before the "contemporary" ones. You know, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corb, Phillip Johnson, etc. before talking more on Fosters, Rogers, Koolhaas, etc. I guess it is the understanding of history and origins of architecture and arts (yes, we do need to learn arts) before going into the mainstream.

If you are in the first year, that book that you are going to buy, Benjamin, I'm not sure if it's going to be of any use to you as of yet. You would only be "preferring" a certain style much later on into your later years...say 3rd or maybe 5th. As a student, you should experiment every style there is. Ecological may not mean a certain style, but it does limit your capability at your initial years...assuming that you are first year.

This post has been edited by clayclws: Feb 4 2008, 01:15 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 4 2008, 01:32 AM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
QUOTE(clayclws @ Feb 4 2008, 12:57 AM)
James Steele...if you have the time, do come over to FBE, UM on the starting of every 1st semester. Steele is from USC and our 4th year have a co-op every year with USC, and Steele is their Prof that brings them (USC students, not UM) all over Asia and stop in UM for the co-op, which last roughly around 2 months. Can look him up for chit chat. Sometimes he gives talk and others can join.

Mind you, most Westerners have really good grasp of English and their talk is very "deep" within the architecture world. Most people can't appreciate because they can't muster the language well enough.


Added on February 4, 2008, 1:12 amBenjamin911, how far along into architecture are you?

Oh, and by the way, I realized that my institution always teach us the "legendary icons" of architecture first, before the "contemporary" ones. You know, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corb, Phillip Johnson, etc. before talking more on Fosters, Rogers, Koolhaas, etc. I guess it is the understanding of history and origins of architecture and arts (yes, we do need to learn arts) before going into the mainstream.

If you are in the first year, that book that you are going to buy, Benjamin, I'm not sure if it's going to be of any use to you as of yet. You would only be "preferring" a certain style much later on into your later years...say 3rd or maybe 5th. As a student, you should experiment every style there is. Ecological may not mean a certain style, but it does limit your capability at your initial years...assuming that you are first year.
*
Well, actually I have not even started studying Architecture yet. I will be going for the March intake in Taylor's School of Architecture & Build Environment.

Basically, I plan to get that book to know more about Ecological/Environmental Architecture...(I am curious to know about it. It looks and sounds interesting to me.)

Thanks for the additional information. notworthy.gif

Regards.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
clayclws
post Feb 4 2008, 01:45 AM
Look at all my stars!!
*******
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 2,656

Joined: Sep 2006
From: Miri, PJ & KL


QUOTE(Benjamin911 @ Feb 4 2008, 01:32 AM)
Well, actually I have not even started studying Architecture yet. I will be going for the March intake in Taylor's School of Architecture & Build Environment.

Basically, I plan to get that book to know more about Ecological/Environmental Architecture...(I am curious to know about it. It looks and sounds interesting to me.)

Thanks for the additional information.  notworthy.gif

Regards.
*
Well, good on you rclxms.gif Salute your enthuthiasm notworthy.gif Keep it up for the next few years. You're going to need it wink.gif While you're at it, you can look up our local legend that made famous the Ecological/Environmental Architecture, Ken Yeang. Well, actually it sent him to stardom. Most universities will be emphasizing on sustainability, so I guess it's good to take an early step. It's hard to comprehend though...that book that you'll be buying...you'll have different outlook of it every year.

If you have the time, do read through 3 books from Francis D.K. Ching: 1. Form, Space and Order; 2. Design Drawing; 3. Building Construction Illustrated.
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 4 2008, 02:00 AM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
QUOTE(clayclws @ Feb 4 2008, 01:45 AM)
Well, good on you  rclxms.gif  Salute your enthuthiasm  notworthy.gif  Keep it up for the next few years. You're going to need it  wink.gif  While you're at it, you can look up our local legend that made famous the Ecological/Environmental Architecture, Ken Yeang. Well, actually it sent him to stardom. Most universities will be emphasizing on sustainability, so I guess it's good to take an early step. It's hard to comprehend though...that book that you'll be buying...you'll have different outlook of it every year.

If you have the time, do read through 3 books from Francis D.K. Ching: 1. Form, Space and Order; 2. Design Drawing; 3. Building Construction Illustrated.
*
Wow, this is getting interesting...

Is Malaysia starting to emphasize on Ecological & Environmental/Green Architecture? Because, I certainly think that we desperately need it!

P.S., Architecture combined with Agriculture is really going to be interesting...

BTW, Malaysia should start looking towards "Green Buildings" for the sake of nature, environment, health, cleanliness, and hygiene...They can spend so much on buildings like the Patronas Twin Towers for example...why not use all those $$$$ for environmental friendly buildings that are crucial for our well being instead? wink.gif

Regards.

BTW, as for those three books that you have mentioned, I will be trying to get them as well. (Perhaps my College would require them.)

smile.gif

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 4 2008, 02:25 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
clayclws
post Feb 4 2008, 02:20 AM
Look at all my stars!!
*******
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 2,656

Joined: Sep 2006
From: Miri, PJ & KL


QUOTE(Benjamin911 @ Feb 4 2008, 02:00 AM)
Wow, this is getting interesting...

Is Malaysia starting to emphasize on Ecological & Environmental Architecture? Because, I certainly think that we desperately need it!

P.S., Architecture combined with Agriculture is really going to be interesting...

BTW, Malaysia should start looking towards "Green Buildings" for the sake of nature, environment, health, cleanliness, and hygiene...They can spend so much on buildings like the Patronas Twin Towers for example...why not use all those $$$$ for environmental friendly buildings that are crucial for our well being instead?

Regards.

BTW, as for those three books that you have mentioned, I will be trying to get them as well. (Perhaps my College would require them.)

smile.gif
*
Not sure if your College requires it of you, but it is recommended by our seniors when I entered the Uni, and had passed on the same wisdom ever since. None of the juniors don't have any of these. If you find it expensive in MPH or Borders or Popular, come to UM bookstore. They sell them pretty cheap there.

Green buildings...hmmm...you'll learn more about it soon wink.gif But here's a little hint: 1. It's not as idyllic as you think; 2. It's not as easy as you think; & 3. Malaysia do have green buildings...and no, it's not green in colour or filled with flora. wink.gif
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post
Benjamin911
post Feb 4 2008, 02:36 AM
~`~artisan`~
*****
Group: Senior Member
Posts: 777

Joined: Nov 2007
QUOTE(clayclws @ Feb 4 2008, 02:20 AM)
Not sure if your College requires it of you, but it is recommended by our seniors when I entered the Uni, and had passed on the same wisdom ever since. None of the juniors don't have any of these. If you find it expensive in MPH or Borders or Popular, come to UM bookstore. They sell them pretty cheap there.

Green buildings...hmmm...you'll learn more about it soon  wink.gif  But here's a little hint: 1. It's not as idyllic as you think; 2. It's not as easy as you think; & 3. Malaysia do have green buildings...and no, it's not green in colour or filled with flora.  wink.gif
*
Alright, I would get those three books even when my college does not require it!! wink.gif (Seeing that all your juniors of UM are having those.) biggrin.gif

BTW, until today, I still do not have a solid idea of where UM is located; except for one of it's entrance located near the University Hospital area: Where my uncle used to work! laugh.gif

I am sure that you know what is Green Building about. wink.gif

For my case now, I have Wikipedia!!! thumbup.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_building

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_architecture

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sustainable_design

wink.gif

BTW, does Malaysia already have Green Buildings? shocking.gif

This post has been edited by Benjamin911: Feb 4 2008, 02:44 AM
User is offlineProfile CardPM
Go to the top of the page
+Quote Post

177 Pages  1 2 3 > » Top
Bump TopicClosed TopicTopic OptionsStart new topic
 

Switch to:
| Lo-Fi Version
0.1042sec    10.26    6 queries    GZIP Disabled
Time is now: 23rd April 2017 - 04:07 PM