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> Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio)

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TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 02:32 AM, updated 5y ago

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Preface and symptoms
A client brought in a Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker system for repair. Main problem is the speaker system cannot be powered up at all. Usually many people would assume that it was due the fuse blown whenever their equipment lost all power, however very often that is not the case. The fuse on this speaker system is easily accessible from outside (right under the power socket) and the fuse was found to be OK. Thus the fault is definitely internal (possibly on the power supply board).

First look inside
The first thing to do is to look at the power supply board. This speaker system uses SMPS (switched-mode power supply) for all its power requirements. There are two SMPS sections on this board, one for standby power and the other for power amplifiers. As with other Creative GigaWorks series, a relay is used to switch on/off the power to the power amplifier section.
user posted image
The light blue thingy labeled "Goodsky" is the relay.


Visible signs of failed components
Right away can see those big CapXon HP series capacitors in various stages of bulging, a blown diode and lots of degraded glue (the brown stuff). The design of that heatsink towering over the capacitors would have easily caused to capacitors to bulge due to prolonged heat exposure from the toasty heatsink. Anyway CapXon is not a good capacitor brand at all and is very well known for bad capacitor problems. In fact, its very common to see failed CapXon capacitors in many electronic equipment such as computer PSUs, LCD monitors, AC-to-DC adapters, etc...
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Bulging capacitors, blown diode and degraded glue on the primary side.


Beware of degraded glue
Thus, why repeatedly the concern on degraded glue? Because degraded glue can become conductive and creates all sorts of weird problems (including short circuits)! You can read more about it here: Conductive Glue Carnage. Thus removal of degraded glue was essential.

One of the snubber network ceramic capacitors literally cracked and fell apart into pieces when removing more degraded glue...
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This is what was left after degraded glue was removed. One of the ceramic capacitor legs can still be seen there.


Degraded glue and standoffs plus GND connection equals trouble
These standoffs are connected to the aluminium heatsink and to GND rail! Thus the degraded glue around other standoffs had to be removed to prevent current and future problems.
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Metallic standoff with connection to heatsink and GND!

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The plastic standoff with degraded glue removed reveals a pad to GND connection also!

Its also possible that the diode blew due to degraded glue plus that metallic standoff (which is connected to GND!). This is the closeup of the blown diode and the blob of degraded glue that extends all the way to the metallic standoff. This diode is in the primary high voltage section! The diode is blown to beyond recognition (very little left of the markings). Later I did found out the actual part number for this diode from schematics...
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More signs of possible future problems
Simply said, more CapXon junk. These capacitors with blue sleeve are all CapXon GS series 85C general purpose type which are not really suited for SMPS (switched-mode power supply) usage. Usually for SMPS, they should be higher temperature 105C low ESR or low impedance type. How did Creative engineers get away with this? Notice those disc-shaped ceramic capacitors besides them? By using ceramic capacitors in parallel to serve/function as the low ESR side! Anyway its quite common to see this configuration in some power supplies (as a method of cost cutting).
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Capacitors for the power amplifier side right after the rectifiers...

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Capacitors for the standby power side right after the rectifiers. The cracked ceramic capacitor and degraded glue were cleaned up as well.

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Capacitors for the standby power output side right after the linear voltage regulators.

Besides those CapXon, there were also a Su'scon SL series 85C general purpose capacitor and a S.J.E RH series 105C general purpose capacitor. Thus my recommendation to the client was also to replace/upgrade all those el-cheapo crap capacitors with high quality low ESR and low impedance capacitors suitable for SMPS.

This post has been edited by lex: Aug 12 2013, 09:35 PM
TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 11:31 AM

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Removal of failed components and cleaning up degraded glue
All the failed components (those big CapXon HP series capacitors and blown diode) were removed and degraded glue cleaned up. Even another big CapXon capacitor (KM series) which did not show signs of bulging was removed as well for capacitor upgrade. Notice the area where the glue was removed had traces and exposed solder pads (add to that, this is the primary high voltage section)!
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Cleaned and ready for new components.

This is the blown diode area under the board. There were leftover solder paste on the PWM power I.C that indicates a previous repair. Also previously there was a blob of degraded glue at the standoff on the right, which I've cleaned up (ie. the previous repairer did not remove the degraded glue around that area). Notice its next to the high voltage traces and solder pads! Definite recipe for current and future disaster.
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Ready for new diode and capacitor upgrade.

These are components (mostly capacitors and a blown diode) that were pulled out. The blown diode (broken into two pieces) is in the bottom foreground. Most of the capacitors are CapXon brand, while one of them was Su'scon brand. There was the odd S.J.E brand capacitor (small one with black sleeve) which most probably was from a previous repair.
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Destined for the junk yard. Two of the big capacitors were bulged quite significantly that they could not stand up straight on their tops.


Replacements
The capacitor replacements were all high quality Japanese capacitors (which took some time to arrive after placing the order). Both the original (blown) diode and the new replacement diode have 1A current rating. However the original (blown) diode had 400V DC blocking voltage rating, while the new diode had much higher specifications with 1000V DC blocking voltage rating.
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Brand new Panasonic TS-ED series capacitors and new diode. Also a brand new Nichicon CS series capacitor on the far right

Bought a new PWM power I.C (its a TOP243YN) for standby, just in case it was that I.C that caused the diode to blow in the first place. Already checked most of the components after the (blown) diode and they seem fine. However the state of the PWM power I.C was unknown (very difficult to check I.Cs). Also had to be wary of ceramic capacitor C6, although measures fine (on the capacitance meter), could have possible breakdown/leakage at higher voltages and cause the diode to blow (again).

Capacitor upgrade
As per recommendation, all CapXon and other el-cheapo brand capacitors were removed and then replaced with high quality Japanese capacitors...
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Rubycon ZLJ series for the power amplifier side right after the rectifiers.

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Nichicon HE series for the standby power side right after the rectifiers. A new ceramic capacitor to replace the cracked one as well.

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Nichicon PS series and HE series for the standby power side right after the linear voltage regulators.

There was another CapXon GS series 85C general purpose capacitor right next (very close) to the toasty heatsink. Thus that was replaced with a very high temperature 150C ceramic capacitor. Notice the bits of residual degraded glue sticking to some of those components on the right. This area previously also had lots of degraded glue as well (already removed and cleaned).
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In the centre, the small yellow ceramic capacitor is an AVX AR series 150C high temperature capacitor.


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 28 2013, 11:31 PM
TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 01:09 PM

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Putting it back together
The power supply board is placed back together with the power amplifiers and interface on the subwoofer unit, ready for testing...
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Back in place and connected.

Another look inside the Creative GigaWorks S750 subwoofer unit. This speaker system uses a triple voice coil woofer!
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There are three pairs of wires connecting the woofer!


Testing and its fixed!
The moment of truth! Connect the power and switch on the power switch at the back, then finally the standby LED light comes up. Pressing the POWER button and the unit is fully switched on (can also hear the relay clicked inside). Feed it with some music and ran it for hours (ie. burn-in test). This speaker system can get pretty toasty as I could feel the heat on the speaker enclosure wood surface. Eventually this speaker system has been returned to the client.

Miscellaneous
Noticed that the power amplifier boards has lots of el-cheapo crap capacitors as well. This time its Jun Fu brand. Just lots of them, big and small. More cost cutting by Creative IMHO. Replacing them would take even more time and increase the burden (due to more component upgrade cost) on the client. The glue remains white in color thus had not degraded yet (possibly a different glue than the one used on the power supply board). My conclusion at the moment is to leave it like that...
user posted image
Jun Fu everywhere on the power amplifier boards, even the small black ones!


Ending notes
Another repair done, though I would consider this a little easy (although the glue removal part was a tedious task). I hope that you'll find this article interesting and informative. icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jul 6 2013, 01:55 PM
Quazacolt
post Jul 5 2013, 07:27 PM

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awesome article/review, giving hopes to every creative gigaworks 5.1/7.1 series owners thumbup.gif thumbup.gif
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 08:03 PM

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Second Creative GigaWorks S750 speaker comes in for repair
Another client (a lowyat.net forummer) brought in another Creative GigaWorks S750 speaker. The main problem with his unit was "soft" and broken/distorted bass. He had tried repairing the speaker power supply himself using this guide since he found bulged capacitors also.

Incorrect components and bad repair
Unfortunately he did not follow everything in this guide, including the replacement components used/selected. First off, the four capacitors used for the amplifier power section were 85C rated (while the original capacitors were 105C rated) and was oversized (too tall). Also note there were still degraded glue remaining as well. See image below...

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Possibly fake Marcon capacitors. Can't find any information for "CEFTW-Q" series.

The top of the capacitors not only touched the heatsink, but was also pushing/bending the heatsink backwards and stressing the MOSFETs on the heatsinks. Also do beware that this type of condition must be avoided at all costs. Primarily the electrolyte inside the capacitors will start boiling due to direct heating from contact with the heatsink. This can cause electrolyte degradation and evaporation, as well as possibly capacitor explosion since the vents on the top of the capacitors were blocked by the heatsink.

This is the view from the side below. Note the heatsink is bending backwards due to the oversized capacitors. Can also see the small capacitor which I've mentioned earlier (the first unit repaired) that was very close to the heatsink, plus still lots of degraded glue in critical areas close to the transformer there.

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Not a pretty sight, especially the degraded glue areas.

Having 105C temperature rating on a capacitor does not always qualify as suitable for SMPS (switched mode power supply) capacitors. These MaxCap MKR series are actually 105C general purpose capacitors. Again, these capacitors were also oversized (too wide).

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These are actually general purpose capacitors, also note the glue underneath.

Degraded glue
There were still a lot of degraded glue in areas where there are exposed solder pads and traces, plus close to those standoffs which are connected to GND. The most critical ones are in the primary high voltage section. In short, he did not follow closely my guide on repairing.

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Degraded glue across the mains input terminals!

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This area contains the SMPS feedback actually.

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There were also degraded glue at the secondary low voltage side.


Remaining original capacitors
There were still those original CapXon GS capacitors that were 85C general purpose type. Besides CapXon there were three small Su'scon SL series capacitors (85C general purpose also). Usually I would recommend replacing them with low impedance/ESR capacitors as this speaker system uses SMPS (switched mode power supply).

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Note that "blob" of degraded glue on the left, actually contains a ceramic capacitor inside!

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More CapXon 85C general purpose capacitors. The small one is a Su'scon.


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 20 2013, 10:05 PM
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 09:40 PM

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Component removal and degraded glue cleanup
All images are self explanatory. When removing the capacitors, I've found the solder pads were damaged (peeled and came off very easily) due to the owner's self-repair, possibly placing the soldering iron on the pads too long and did not use any solder flux for faster de-soldering. When soldering and/or desoldering always try not to heat up the board too much as it can melt the glue that held the solder pads and traces. Any jaded and dirty solder joint can take time to melt, thus always use solder flux to allow the solder to melt easily and faster.

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The pads on the top row are goners. No connection at all.

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Incorrect capacitors removed. Note the damaged pads on the top layer as well.

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No more degraded glue. Critical areas cleaned.

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Mains input area cleaned as well.


Capacitor replacements
Just as before, all electrolytic capacitors were replaced with proper high quality ones.

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The same Panasonic TS-ED series as in the first repair.

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Instead of Nichicon CS series, this time I used Panasonic ED series for the standby power section. Other replacements remains the same. Degraded glue cleaned up here as well.

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Another change, this time using Panasonic FM series. Luckily that ceramic capacitor did not crack during glue removal (unlike the first one)...

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And this time Nichicon PW series here...

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And lastly, Rubycon ZLH series instead of Rubycon ZLJ series....


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 03:29 AM
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 11:07 PM

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Subwoofer problem
The main reason the subwoofer sounded broken and distorted was that all 3 voice coils inside the 8" woofer were damaged. At first diagnostics, 2 out of 3 voice coils were dead (no connection at all). During test of the sound channels, the 3rd voice coil finally gave up. Decided remove the woofer to check. When pressing down slightly on the woofer cone can hear scratchy and scraping sounds, indicating the voice coil wires have become loose and/or broken.

user posted image
The spoiled woofer...

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Triple terminals for triple voice coils...

Since this is a voice coil problem, and furthermore triple voice coil then its going to be very tedious and time consuming to repair (especially the coil rewinding part with multiple layers for each voice coil). I've decided to send this woofer to speaker repair specialist instead. Have other repairs to attend to also.

More problems - sound channel randomly goes off
Also noticed the sound in some of the channels randomly goes missing/gone. Looking around the audio processor board, I noticed there were signs of degraded glue on the connectors. See the images below. Even though the glue does not seem degraded, it can be very deceptive as I found out there were actually degraded glue underneath. Wiggling the cables around, I found the fault easily. Chemicals from that degraded glue vaporised by heat (generated by the power amplifiers and power supply section) during usage corroded the connectors. The pins all looks dark and not shiny at all. Its not easy to clean these oxidized connectors.

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Don't be fooled. Scrape it off to find brownish degraded glue underneath!

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The connectors are no longer shiny, can see multiple colors due to oxidation...

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More oxidized connectors, on the power amplifier board, revealed during degraded glue cleanup


Putting it back together
The woofer was finally repaired and brought back. Time to assemble everything together.

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Partially assembled. Those wires hanging are for the woofer,.

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The repaired woofer back in place. The dust cap doesn't look as pretty as before though due to repairs.


Testing and its done.
Switch the speaker on and run feed some test audio signals to it, and the bass comes rumbling shaking everything in the room. Finally, its done.

user posted image


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 12:35 AM
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 03:28 AM

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lex, have you asked if creative wanna hire you? you're definitely doing a way better job (and by that i mean they've done pretty much nothing at all lol) compared to the folks at creative
ADJ
post Aug 21 2013, 10:34 AM

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very interesting. My old Megaworks 550THX had a similar issue, apparently the blown cap spilled its guts all over the PCB...so now it's consigned to my storeroom, dunno what to do with it, with 5 excellent condition satellites, heh...
andrekua2
post Aug 21 2013, 12:35 PM

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Bro,

How do you remove those glue? I seen them spread on a large surface with many components and pcb traces. Scraping them or using chemical solution?

Thanks you.
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 12:51 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 03:28 AM)
lex, have you asked if creative wanna hire you? you're definitely doing a way better job (and by that i mean they've done pretty much nothing at all lol) compared to the folks at creative
*
I think they already expect these not to last long, as with other manufacturers. Probably they expect the user to buy new one after the speaker is spoiled. wink.gif

QUOTE(ADJ @ Aug 21 2013, 10:34 AM)
very interesting. My old Megaworks 550THX had a similar issue, apparently the blown cap spilled its guts all over the PCB...so now it's consigned to my storeroom, dunno what to do with it, with 5 excellent condition satellites, heh...
*
Which PCB? Is it the power section or the amplifier section? hmm.gif

QUOTE(andrekua2 @ Aug 21 2013, 12:35 PM)
How do you remove those glue? I seen them spread on a large surface with many components and pcb traces. Scraping them or using chemical solution?

Thanks you.
*
Just very slowly, carefully and meticulously scrape it off. Have to be aware of components under the glue. Sometimes have to temporarily desolder the components in order to clean. Quite often very time consuming. See example below... icon_rolleyes.gif

user posted image
Before. Note the brown spots on the on top of the glue, those are signs of degraded glue underneath...

user posted image
After...


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 01:14 PM
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 21 2013, 12:51 PM)
I think they already expect these not to last long, as with other manufacturers. Probably they expect the user to buy new one after the speaker is spoiled. wink.gif
*
and THATS where i don't get them, there's NO NEW ONE LOL.

the only new multi channeled 5.1/7.1 creative are releasing are their non gigaworks series which typically have shit SQ. sure, people don't generally expect SQ from multi channels/gaming speakers, and they are way cheaper than the gigaworks series, but some people (like me) who does, are just out of luck.

the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
power911
post Aug 21 2013, 04:11 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
*
this nod.gif nod.gif nod.gif

This post has been edited by power911: Aug 21 2013, 04:24 PM
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 04:43 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
and THATS where i don't get them, there's NO NEW ONE LOL.

the only new multi channeled 5.1/7.1 creative are releasing are their non gigaworks series which typically have shit SQ. sure, people don't generally expect SQ from multi channels/gaming speakers, and they are way cheaper than the gigaworks series, but some people (like me) who does, are just out of luck.
Nowadays manufacturers try to cut cost as much as possible (just compare Altec Lansing of yesteryears with Altec Lansing today for example). Also these GigaWork and MegaWork speaker systems use multi-voice coil woofers which are rare and expensive. wink.gif

QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
*
The midrange depends on the design of the ampliifer system (especially the high pass filter section) and primarily the drivers themselves. For good midrange, the drivers have to be of certain minimum size (diameter) and depth. Nowadays with most 2.1, 5.1 and 7.1 systems, the drivers in the satellite speakers are pretty small. Thus many would note the missing or hollow midrange. Replacing those tiny satellites speakers with a bigger one may give you back that midrange. As for modifications, besides the satellite speakers also very much depends on the amplifier system as well. If the preamp section for the satellites has a high pass filter then you try changing its cutoff frequency. Sometimes its the satellites that determine the sound. For example, on the Edifier M3300 there are lack of high pass filters for the satellites in the preamp section, thus its the satellites that determines the midrange and tweeter frequencies. icon_rolleyes.gif
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 05:20 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 21 2013, 04:43 PM)
Nowadays manufacturers try to cut cost as much as possible (just compare Altec Lansing of yesteryears with Altec Lansing today for example). Also these GigaWork and MegaWork speaker systems use multi-voice coil woofers which are rare and expensive. wink.gif

The midrange depends on the design of the ampliifer system (especially the high pass filter section) and primarily the drivers themselves. For good midrange, the drivers have to be of certain minimum size (diameter) and depth. Nowadays with most 2.1, 5.1 and 7.1 systems, the drivers in the satellite speakers are pretty small. Thus many would note the missing or hollow midrange. Replacing those tiny satellites speakers with a bigger one may give you back that midrange. As for modifications, besides the satellite speakers also very much depends on the amplifier system as well. If the preamp section for the satellites has a high pass filter then you try changing its cutoff frequency. Sometimes its the satellites that determine the sound. For example, on the Edifier M3300 there are lack of high pass filters for the satellites in the preamp section, thus its the satellites that determines the midrange and tweeter frequencies. icon_rolleyes.gif
*
hence you can see my reluctance in replacing my gigaworks LOL

as for the mods, sounds like a lot of work and the cost may even exceed the speakers set themselves :/
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 05:43 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 05:20 PM)
as for the mods, sounds like a lot of work and the cost may even exceed the speakers set themselves :/
*
Replacing the satellite speakers are easy (a piece of cake, as one would say). But changing the cut-off frequency on the amplifier system very much depends on the design of the amplifier itself. If its a simple passive or active RC filter network then very easy (usually either resistor and/or capacitor change only). But if its controlled by a DSP in some digital systems, then its either very difficult, or just not applicable. hmm.gif

rlewin
post Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM

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Lex, I stumbled on your post while trying to find anything that can help me with my own sets of these. I have a few questions.
Are there any schematics for the Amp boards?
Do you have a comprehensive component list I can use to locate replacement Capacitors (I have no electronics training but I know what looks bad)
Apart from ordering capacitors with the same uf, voltage, heat rating and dimensions I have no idea what I need.
I have my original set and over the last year have purchased 3 other sets of these because they are great (when they work)
Any guidance you can give me will be most appreciated.
Cheers
Rod
TSlex
post Aug 27 2013, 06:32 PM

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QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
Lex, I stumbled on your post while trying to find anything that can help me with my own sets of these.  I have a few questions.
Are there any schematics for the Amp boards?
Nopes, I don't have the schematics for the power amplifier boards. Since those are BASH amplifier I.Cs, the circuit layout and components used are very straight forward (follows closely the datasheet for the BASH amplifier I.C). wink.gif

QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
Do you have a comprehensive component list I can use to locate replacement Capacitors (I have no electronics training but I know what looks bad)
Apart from ordering capacitors with the same uf, voltage, heat rating and dimensions I have no idea what I need.
All the capacitors that needs to be replaced already mentioned here (with the exception of the big ceramic capacitors at the standby power section, and the film capacitors at the main power section). Make sure get correct/proper replacement capacitors. Just replace what is required, and highly recommend replacing all those CapXon and Su'scon brand capacitors even if they still look good. Roughly... icon_idea.gif

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink

Still, depending on the fault and symptoms then you have to check other parts/components as well (e.g. MOSFET failure which is not mentioned here). hmm.gif

QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
I have my original set and over the last year have purchased 3 other sets of these because they are great (when they work)
Any guidance you can give me will be most appreciated.
Cheers
Rod
*
Seems to be common to see this model with lots of problems. Some even tried the hair dryer treatment which I do not recommend at all, as it may eventually kill/destroy the components inside. Since you have 3 other sets to tinker with, there's a lot of room to try out and learn... icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Aug 27 2013, 08:22 PM
rlewin
post Aug 28 2013, 05:30 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 27 2013, 08:32 PM)
Nopes, I don't have the schematics for the power amplifier boards. Since those are BASH amplifier I.Cs, the circuit layout and components used are very straight forward (follows closely the datasheet for the BASH amplifier I.C). wink.gif

All the capacitors that needs to be replaced already mentioned here (with the exception of the big ceramic capacitors at the standby power section, and the film capacitors at the main power section). Make sure get correct/proper replacement capacitors. Just replace what is required, and highly recommend replacing all those CapXon and Su'scon brand capacitors even if they still look good. Roughly...  icon_idea.gif

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink

Still, depending on the fault and symptoms then you have to check other parts/components as well (e.g. MOSFET failure which is not mentioned here).  hmm.gif

Seems to be common to see this model with lots of problems. Some even tried the hair dryer treatment which I do not recommend at all, as it may eventually kill/destroy the components inside. Since you have 3 other sets to tinker with, there's a lot of room to try out and learn...  icon_rolleyes.gif
*
Many thanks for the advice and tips, I hope I can resurrect these sets by following your guide. Wish there was a better way to remove that glue.
Cheers
Rod
rlewin
post Sep 3 2013, 05:54 AM

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Lex, in your second repair you noticed the pads were gone, how did you deal with that? I have a similar situation.
Cheers
Rod

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