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 Pricing reference for Freelance Design Projects, Any idea where to get it?

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TSputeri_aisha_92
post Apr 26 2024, 10:44 AM, updated 2 months ago

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I have just started my freelance design service, my clients always ask me to quote them a price for their project but I have no idea what is the market price for that project. Is there any website or place that we can visit to get some ideas or pricing references for design projects such as brochure design, video editing, animation design, web design, etc.? blush.gif
MrBaba
post Apr 26 2024, 10:46 AM

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Go work for a company then only u start la . If like this u pun tak tau confirm costing tax etc u also tak tau one
TSputeri_aisha_92
post Apr 27 2024, 04:40 PM

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QUOTE(MrBaba @ Apr 26 2024, 10:46 AM)
Go work for a company then only u start la . If like this u pun tak tau confirm costing tax etc u also tak tau one
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i worked before in inhouse designer company, now just want to try do freelance
bhengsoh
post Apr 27 2024, 07:09 PM

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Consider the scope of work and the value you bring to the table when quoting a price to your clients. Good luck.
purplefellow
post Apr 29 2024, 02:22 PM

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Because each project has different sets of requirements, it's very difficult to have standard pricing. You can ask your client for their budget first before negotiating.

Some things to consider when setting your price:

* Size of client's company:
Bigger companies usually have a higher budget to spend compared to individuals. Try negotiating for higher pay from larger clients.

* Design usage:
If the client is going to make big profit off your design work, consider charging more. For example, if the client plans to sell T-shirts printed with your design.

* Time spent:
Estimate the time needed to complete the work, then add a buffer on top of it in case unexpected issues arise. Also set a limit on the number of significant design changes the client can request, or else it can be never ending.

* Skill level:
If it takes you longer to deliver the work due to inexperience, consider lowering your rates until you've reached a more comfortable level.

* Cost of equipment/software:
Not everything is free or lasts forever. Don't forget to price that into your rates!

* Taxes:
Make sure taxes are taken into consideration as well.

* Demand:
If you're in high demand and can't take in all the work, it's time to up your price! Of course, if the opposite happens, try lowering your rate instead.


All in all, there isn't really a right or wrong price for a project. When starting out, just set a price that you feel comfortable with. Would you be happy to receive RM100 for 2 days of poster design work? If yes, then go for it. If not, negotiate for a higher price. It all boils down to willing buyer, willing seller.

After finishing a job, if you felt you should've been paid better due to all the work you've put in, just raise your price the next time. After a few projects, you'll learn the best pricing to go with.

Finally, don't be afraid to say no to low-paying work! Often it's just a waste of time and energy unless you think the experience or having the work in your portfolio will be worth the trouble.

All the best thumbsup.gif
TSputeri_aisha_92
post Apr 29 2024, 04:26 PM

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QUOTE(purplefellow @ Apr 29 2024, 02:22 PM)
Because each project has different sets of requirements, it's very difficult to have standard pricing. You can ask your client for their budget first before negotiating.

Some things to consider when setting your price:

* Size of client's company:
Bigger companies usually have a higher budget to spend compared to individuals. Try negotiating for higher pay from larger clients.

* Design usage:
If the client is going to make big profit off your design work, consider charging more. For example, if the client plans to sell T-shirts printed with your design.

* Time spent:
Estimate the time needed to complete the work, then add a buffer on top of it in case unexpected issues arise. Also set a limit on the number of significant design changes the client can request, or else it can be never ending.

* Skill level:
If it takes you longer to deliver the work due to inexperience, consider lowering your rates until you've reached a more comfortable level.

* Cost of equipment/software:
Not everything is free or lasts forever. Don't forget to price that into your rates!

* Taxes:
Make sure taxes are taken into consideration as well.

* Demand:
If you're in high demand and can't take in all the work, it's time to up your price! Of course, if the opposite happens, try lowering your rate instead.
All in all, there isn't really a right or wrong price for a project. When starting out, just set a price that you feel comfortable with. Would you be happy to receive RM100 for 2 days of poster design work? If yes, then go for it. If not, negotiate for a higher price. It all boils down to willing buyer, willing seller.

After finishing a job, if you felt you should've been paid better due to all the work you've put in, just raise your price the next time. After a few projects, you'll learn the best pricing to go with.

Finally, don't be afraid to say no to low-paying work! Often it's just a waste of time and energy unless you think the experience or having the work in your portfolio will be worth the trouble.

All the best  thumbsup.gif
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wow thanks for your opinions ya, it really helps! I just worry that I charge the price too low, i am wondering where do you guys normally get the pricing reference before you charge your clients.

purplefellow
post Apr 30 2024, 10:15 AM

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QUOTE(puteri_aisha_92 @ Apr 29 2024, 04:26 PM)
wow thanks for your opinions ya, it really helps! I just worry that I charge the price too low, i am wondering where do you guys normally get the pricing reference before you charge your clients.
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I've shifted away from the design space over 10 years ago, so I've no idea how the pricing goes nowadays, with inflation and all.

But you can:
1) Ask friends, seniors or coworkers who's doing similar work
2) Ask client for their budget before giving your quote (some will even state their price/budget upfront)
3) Check pricing of other freelancers who advertise online (you can pretend to be a client and ask them for a quote too tongue.gif )

OR just set a price you're comfortable with and don't worry too much. It's not the end of the world if you charged too low/high.
Most important thing is to able to learn from your mistakes. You can always improve your pricing for the next client. icon_rolleyes.gif
EtonzzK
post Jun 8 2024, 04:59 PM

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You can check out websites like Upwork and Fiverr to get a feel for the going rates. Also, Behance has some good examples and might give you an idea of what others are charging. It's always a good idea to start with a rate you're comfortable with and adjust based on feedback and demand.

 

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