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> Does personal lifestyle affect your code style?, Assessment of candidates.

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TSjbcoder
post Jul 30 2020, 12:16 PM, updated 2w ago

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I am just curious about effects of personal habits on the quality of code that you end up writing.

Let's say you're an unkempt person.


1. You don't clean up your room.
2. You don't do dishes or clean them after using.
3. You deposit a lot of leftover food in the kitchen sink.
4. Your living quarters are filthy and you don't clean up.
5. You don't ever take out the trash.
6. You eat whatever crap you can find and don't bother about how to eat heathily.
7. You are obesed because of your lifestyle.



As someone who writes code, do you think a person with such a lifestyle habit in the above list is capable of writing quality or usable code ?

How much does a person's personal habits and lifestyle affect the kind of code they write and would you take this into consideration when hiring someone if you knew the parameters of their lifestyle? The first sign that you can see instantly is unkempt attire, lack of grooming and obesity during interviewing process.


Have you ever studied the correlation of code written by people and their personal habit/lifestyle ?
WongGei
post Jul 30 2020, 01:04 PM

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personal habit/lifestyle has no direct connection with coding style. More on passion. If one has passion on coding, they can code well. he/she might be has passion in cleaning or house work.
TSjbcoder
post Jul 30 2020, 01:52 PM

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QUOTE(WongGei @ Jul 30 2020, 01:04 PM)
personal habit/lifestyle has no direct connection with coding style. More on passion. If one has passion on coding, they can code well. he/she might be has passion in cleaning or house work.
*
Passion does not guarantee competence. Passion only guarantees your interest will not die but that doesn't mean you will do a good job of whatever you're passionate in.



malleus
post Jul 30 2020, 03:53 PM

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QUOTE(WongGei @ Jul 30 2020, 01:04 PM)
personal habit/lifestyle has no direct connection with coding style. More on passion. If one has passion on coding, they can code well. he/she might be has passion in cleaning or house work.
*
Passion is kind of over rated. It tends to be the first thing that goes out the window when unexpected problems happen (which is the norm in just about any project). What's more important is the sense of responsibility to see the deliverables through.

But more to the topic, different people cares about different things. I've seen people who don't care about how they dress, but other things like their car can be spotless. Or work desk being a total cluttered mess, but their file organisation on their computers being kept very neat and tidy
Csharp. P
post Jul 30 2020, 04:41 PM

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Since when code clean is a apart competency? Clean room does not guarantee a clean code. Clean code definition is less code? Then you misunderstood clean code wrongly. I sometime wrote messy code because I forsea something will happens in the future after I talked to other department, then got accused by others my clean is messy.
bumpo
post Jul 30 2020, 07:26 PM

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QUOTE(Csharp. @ Jul 30 2020, 04:41 PM)
Since when code clean is a apart competency? Clean room does not guarantee a clean code. Clean code definition is less code? Then you misunderstood clean code wrongly. I sometime wrote messy code because I forsea something will happens in the future after I talked to other department, then got accused by others my clean is messy.
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"clean" code could be interpreted an code that is maintainable i.e. using proper convention, having a consistent style which improves readability, naming variables meaningfully, etc
this can be considered part of competency. some companies even put this down as kpi for developers as "the means justifies the end" approach to technical implementation is getting to be lesser acceptable these days
RookieDaddy
post Jul 30 2020, 07:31 PM

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QUOTE(jbcoder @ Jul 30 2020, 12:16 PM)
I am just curious about effects of personal habits on the quality of code that you end up writing.

Let's say you're an unkempt person.
1. You don't clean up your room.
2. You don't do dishes or clean them after using.
3. You deposit a lot of leftover food in the kitchen sink.
4. Your living quarters are filthy and you don't clean up.
5. You don't ever take out the trash.
6. You eat whatever crap you can find and don't bother about how to eat heathily.
7. You are obesed because of your lifestyle.
As someone who writes code, do you think a person with such a lifestyle habit in the above list is capable of writing quality or usable code ?

How much does a person's personal habits and lifestyle affect the kind of code they write and would you take this into consideration when hiring someone if you knew the parameters of their lifestyle? The first sign that you can see instantly is unkempt attire, lack of grooming and obesity during interviewing process.
Have you ever studied the correlation of code written by people and their personal habit/lifestyle ?
*
I honestly have never met such a coder, but I have met and coach a few who are initially from the other end of the spectrum... they look like movie star and act like saint, but they code like gremlins... I spent between 3 to 7 months to coach them so they're worth their given titles. innocent.gif
CroKroc
post Jul 30 2020, 09:07 PM

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dont think there are any direct correlation between lifestyle and coding style
silverhawk
post Aug 1 2020, 06:56 PM

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QUOTE(jbcoder @ Jul 30 2020, 12:16 PM)
I am just curious about effects of personal habits on the quality of code that you end up writing.

Let's say you're an unkempt person.
1. You don't clean up your room.
2. You don't do dishes or clean them after using.
3. You deposit a lot of leftover food in the kitchen sink.
4. Your living quarters are filthy and you don't clean up.
5. You don't ever take out the trash.
6. You eat whatever crap you can find and don't bother about how to eat heathily.
7. You are obesed because of your lifestyle.
As someone who writes code, do you think a person with such a lifestyle habit in the above list is capable of writing quality or usable code ?

How much does a person's personal habits and lifestyle affect the kind of code they write and would you take this into consideration when hiring someone if you knew the parameters of their lifestyle? The first sign that you can see instantly is unkempt attire, lack of grooming and obesity during interviewing process.
Have you ever studied the correlation of code written by people and their personal habit/lifestyle ?
*
There's probably some correlation, but you can't make a judgement on it because the correlation would be rather weak.

A better indicator is using the Big 5 Personality traits.

- Openness
- Conscientiousness
- Extraversion
- Agreeableness
- Neuroticism

For coding, O and C are the most important factors. The person high in O will be more creative, but this person also tends to be messy and can't stay focused on mundane tasks for long, give these people the task to write unit tests and they'll perform poorly. The person high in C on the other hand is great at being orderly and doing the mundane work.

This is not to say that if you're low in certain attributes means you can't perform, just that the natural talent and motivation is different. For example if someone is low in C, they can make an effort to do a simple schedule and try their best to stick to it. More effort and discipline is required to overcome their natural tendency.
cubiclecarbonate
post Aug 4 2020, 10:05 AM

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QUOTE(jbcoder @ Jul 30 2020, 12:16 PM)
I am just curious about effects of personal habits on the quality of code that you end up writing.

Let's say you're an unkempt person.
1. You don't clean up your room.
2. You don't do dishes or clean them after using.
3. You deposit a lot of leftover food in the kitchen sink.
4. Your living quarters are filthy and you don't clean up.
5. You don't ever take out the trash.
6. You eat whatever crap you can find and don't bother about how to eat heathily.
7. You are obesed because of your lifestyle.
As someone who writes code, do you think a person with such a lifestyle habit in the above list is capable of writing quality or usable code ?

How much does a person's personal habits and lifestyle affect the kind of code they write and would you take this into consideration when hiring someone if you knew the parameters of their lifestyle? The first sign that you can see instantly is unkempt attire, lack of grooming and obesity during interviewing process.
Have you ever studied the correlation of code written by people and their personal habit/lifestyle ?
*
what i do believe is my attire affects my working style. whenever i wear casuals like round neck shirts with jeans, i will have a different views on the platforms (like performance optimization, integrations etc). but if i am wearing a tshirt and slacks like a corporate officer, the idea will more to business (how to make more money from the platform).

but now, everyday also round neck shirts with jeans and sneakers. laugh.gif
Tullamarine
post Yesterday, 02:23 AM

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QUOTE(jbcoder @ Jul 30 2020, 12:16 PM)
I am just curious about effects of personal habits on the quality of code that you end up writing..................
Have you ever studied the correlation of code written by people and their personal habit/lifestyle ?
*
Not really. But I think it is more about personality traits like being a perfectionist who is obsessed about everything, such as proper naming convention (usage of underscore before or after variable name, small or capital letters).

I am more concerned about code comments. Does clean code necessarily mean no comments beside code?
malleus
post Yesterday, 08:22 AM

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QUOTE(Tullamarine @ Aug 6 2020, 02:23 AM)
Not really. But I think it is more about personality traits like being a perfectionist who is obsessed about everything, such as proper naming convention (usage of underscore before or after variable name, small or capital letters).
Linter configuration being checked into the project helps a lot with conventions enforced across the entire team or organisation.


QUOTE(Tullamarine @ Aug 6 2020, 02:23 AM)
I am more concerned about code comments. Does clean code necessarily mean no comments beside code?
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Comments cannot be avoided all the time. It just means, as much as possible, keep your code readable so you don't need to give comments to explain what it's doing.
silverhawk
post Yesterday, 09:30 AM

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QUOTE(Tullamarine @ Aug 6 2020, 02:23 AM)
I am more concerned about code comments. Does clean code necessarily mean no comments beside code?
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Aside from comments to generate docs, comments should only exist to provide context to non-obvious reasons. Like if some api behaves weirdly and you had to hack a workaround.





 

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