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> Would you support regulating the sex industry?

Would you support regulating the sex industry?
 
Yes [ 23 ] ** [71.88%]
No [ 9 ] ** [28.12%]
Total Votes: 32
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TSsorbonne
post Jul 27 2020, 07:30 PM, updated 2w ago

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Would you support the government to regulate the sex industry like in Singapore, Germany and the Netherlands? Perhaps not for the entire country but a specific limited zone?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_...the_Netherlands
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Germany
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Singapore

Advantages
1. Taxation income for the government
2. Increase in public health with mandatory health checks of sex workers
3. Reduce black market control of the trade
4. Increased tourism?
5. Risk free experience for customers (no chance of getting brought to police lockup)

Disadvantages
1. Morally questionable
2. Increased prices for services due to taxation
3. Increased crime?

This post has been edited by sorbonne: Jul 27 2020, 07:58 PM
jVIPERs2
post Jul 27 2020, 07:35 PM

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Would be easier for gov to know where they are...

Not sure how it will be properly regulated here though...ppl here best at abusing loopholes...
TSsorbonne
post Jul 27 2020, 07:47 PM

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QUOTE(jVIPERs2 @ Jul 27 2020, 07:35 PM)
Would be easier for gov to know where they are...

Not sure how it will be properly regulated here though...ppl here best at abusing loopholes...
*
Of course that's happening as there is no legal method for the industry to exist. It's similar to the alcohol or tobacco if it was illegal to buy, sell and possess in Malaysia i.e. it would still be around but fully controlled by the black market.
prescribed
post Jul 27 2020, 07:51 PM

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I just want to Cheong....puhhhlllezz

This post has been edited by prescribed: Jul 27 2020, 07:51 PM
ramz
post Jul 27 2020, 08:29 PM

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Is there hard evidence that countries that legalize prostitution is better in human well-being management than countries that don't?

The data we should look at:
1. human trafficking
2. sex related diseases
3. marriage issues
4. Sex crimes

I don't support prostitution, but my mind can be changed with evidence.
klch87
post Jul 27 2020, 11:24 PM

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QUOTE(ramz @ Jul 27 2020, 08:29 PM)
Is there hard evidence that countries that legalize prostitution is better in human well-being management than countries that don't?

The data we should look at:
1. human trafficking
2. sex related diseases
3. marriage issues
4. Sex crimes

I don't support prostitution, but my mind can be changed with evidence.
*
Per the link, seems there is a line between regulating and legalizing.

By legalizing means the prostitution laws are more lenient while regulating means the laws are more stringent.

In any case, comparing netherlands side by side with singapore kinda wrong because singapore has strict laws, while netherlands dont.
It should be comparing netherlands and thailand.

Anyhow, paying for sex in malaysia is a big No No because we are conservative and in a good way, upholding family morality and partner fidelity. However these sex services are usually secret agenda and not as open in other countries.


TSsorbonne
post Jul 28 2020, 12:21 AM

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QUOTE(klch87 @ Jul 27 2020, 11:24 PM)
Per the link, seems there is a line between regulating and legalizing.

By legalizing means the prostitution laws are more lenient while regulating means the laws are more stringent.

In any case, comparing netherlands side by side with singapore kinda wrong because singapore has strict laws, while netherlands dont.
It should be comparing netherlands and thailand.

Anyhow, paying for sex in malaysia is a big No No because we are conservative and in a good way, upholding family morality and partner fidelity. However these sex services are usually secret agenda and not as open in other countries.
*
Prostitution is the world's oldest profession and governments around the world are rarely able to stop it from happening. If you ban it, it goes underground but never disappears. So rather than pretend that it doesn't exist one approach is to acknowledge that it exist but only allow it with conditions (regulations). Not many know this but actually prostitution is illegal in Thailand according to law (de jure) despite less enforcement.
CRaider2
post Jul 28 2020, 12:29 AM

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QUOTE(sorbonne @ Jul 28 2020, 12:21 AM)
Prostitution is the world's oldest profession and governments around the world are rarely able to stop it from happening. If you ban it, it goes underground but never disappears. So rather than pretend that it doesn't exist one approach is to acknowledge that it exist but only allow it with conditions (regulations). Not many know this but actually prostitution is illegal in Thailand according to law (de jure) despite less enforcement.
*
Not possible here. What is the official religion? Which politician would risk committing political suicide to advance this? Cultural differences towards sex. Sg is the most similar to us. I agree it needs to be regulated but this would never see the light of day here. Granted that if allowed you probably find half the civil service patronizing those places
mitun
post Jul 28 2020, 02:54 AM

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QUOTE(CRaider2 @ Jul 28 2020, 12:29 AM)
Not possible here. What is the official religion? Which politician would risk committing political suicide to advance this? Cultural differences towards sex. Sg is the most similar to us. I agree it needs to be regulated but this would never see the light of day here. Granted that if allowed you probably find half the civil service patronizing those places
*
Religion is probably the biggest barrier here but if we use gambling as an example it is possible to allow things which are not permissible to religious people by saying that it is only allowed for those from different religions, same as gambling. The reality is prostitution in Malaysia is and has been for a long time a huge industry which generates massive profits for those operating in the shadows. Singapore accepted that they couldn’t control the sex trade by making it illegal because the demand was too strong and the same applies to Malaysia. Legalizing it would provide the workers with better protection, allow for more screening and raise tax dollars which otherwise just go into the pockets of crooks and corrupt officials. It makes complete sense to legalize it based on the substance of what actually goes on in the country.
ramz
post Jul 28 2020, 05:16 AM

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QUOTE(klch87 @ Jul 27 2020, 11:24 PM)
Per the link, seems there is a line between regulating and legalizing.

By legalizing means the prostitution laws are more lenient while regulating means the laws are more stringent.

In any case, comparing netherlands side by side with singapore kinda wrong because singapore has strict laws, while netherlands dont.
It should be comparing netherlands and thailand.

Anyhow, paying for sex in malaysia is a big No No because we are conservative and in a good way, upholding family morality and partner fidelity. However these sex services are usually secret agenda and not as open in other countries.
*
Regulating or legalizing, seems like both are pretty much saying let's allow prostitution. You can't regulate prostitution without legalizing it.

I don't support prostitution. Coz I think it bring more harm then good. But I don't have the evidence, but the thought on human trafficking, causing family problems does bother me, among others ( I mentioned 4). Unless someone can give me statistical evidences overall is good for human well-being. But it is a hard study I must say, coz the devil is in the details. There are many ways to regulate.

Malaysia has always been about what religion says. I am not interested. I am interested in evidence.
jVIPERs2
post Jul 28 2020, 06:01 AM

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QUOTE(sorbonne @ Jul 27 2020, 07:47 PM)
Of course that's happening as there is no legal method for the industry to exist. It's similar to the alcohol or tobacco if it was illegal to buy, sell and possess in Malaysia i.e. it would still be around but fully controlled by the black market.
*
But since alcohol & tobacco is regulated, there’s still plenty of black market options available...some to the extent of killing ppl due to illegal substances in the mix...

Like another comment says...legalising it is to only offer a ‘safer’ way for the consumer but not really to put a stop into the illegal trade...
statikinetic
post Jul 28 2020, 07:16 AM

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Personally, I would say yes to regulation. This industry is going to happen whether we want it or not.
But I absolutely do not see this happening within the social context of Malaysia. It is totally counter to the shift in religiousity locally, which has a stronger grasp.
abc2005
post Jul 28 2020, 10:20 AM

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In Malaysia, not a chance. The govt won't risk its own reputation as a Islamic country.

I think most of the East Asian countries/territories are also having the same problem as conservative nations - China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Koreas, Exception would be Macau and Japan.

Btw, as the oldest industry in the history of mankind, regulations can't go wrong. This industry is going to flourish no matter what, especially with the booming population.
TSsorbonne
post Jul 28 2020, 11:23 AM

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QUOTE(mitun @ Jul 28 2020, 02:54 AM)
Religion is probably the biggest barrier here but if we use gambling as an example it is possible to allow things which are not permissible to religious people by saying that it is only allowed for those from different religions, same as gambling. The reality is prostitution in Malaysia is and has been for a long time a huge industry which generates massive profits for those operating in the shadows. Singapore accepted that they couldn’t control the sex trade by making it illegal because the demand was too strong and the same applies to Malaysia. Legalizing it would provide the workers with better protection, allow for more screening and raise tax dollars which otherwise just go into the pockets of crooks and corrupt officials. It makes complete sense to legalize it based on the substance of what actually goes on in the country.
*
Religion and a conservative culture is indeed a barrier for it to happen. However like some other countries in Asia there are many contradictions.

Despite alcohol being illegal to most of the population we have 2 major alcohol factories (Carlsberg and Heineken) in Malaysia and more factories for smaller brands (yes, there are more than 2. Those liquor you see being sold in KKMart are actually made locally). Despite gambling being illegal to most of the population we have a casino plus many 4D and scratch card operators. Despite smoking being illegal to most of the population, we have multiple cigarette and vape manufacturers and sellers operating openly.

And in spite of all that I don't see the support for the mainstream government eroding. It just have to be cleverly branded by legislators, perhaps in the lines of "accepting the reality that the industry will happen no matter what the authorities does" or maybe "wanting to clamp down on black market activities by allowing it to operate in a specific location that will be monitored strictly".
Eurobeater
post Aug 1 2020, 06:36 PM

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I'm quite pro-choice, though I do find prostitution morally objectionable. But if the person wants to "cheongz" and they are not bringing harm unto others, then don't see why not.

Obviously, the industry is capable of bringing harm to others. The workers may be trafficked from another country or the "clients" may contract STDs which may require treatment and thus burdening the public health system.

Which is why the regulation bit will be very important. But we need to be careful on what kind of regulation we want. Do we want health workers making unplanned raids at the "shops"? What will be the costs of regulation we intend to impose on these "businesses"? Should disputes occur between client and "service provider", how should it be arbitrated? Have a feeling many questions here may result in heated debates and deadlock in Parliament.
Pakatan SinMa Plus
post Aug 1 2020, 08:27 PM

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QUOTE(sorbonne @ Jul 27 2020, 07:30 PM)
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Would you support the government to regulate the sex industry like in Singapore, Germany and the Netherlands? Perhaps not for the entire country but a specific limited zone?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_...the_Netherlands
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Germany
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prostitution_in_Singapore

Advantages
1. Taxation income for the government
2. Increase in public health with mandatory health checks of sex workers
3. Reduce black market control of the trade
4. Increased tourism?
5. Risk free experience for customers (no chance of getting brought to police lockup)

Disadvantages
1. Morally questionable
2. Increased prices for services due to taxation
3. Increased crime?
*
If we talk about the need, the answer is yes, this industry needs to be regulated to secure the workers, customers and provide tax income to the country.

If we talk about possibility to regulate this industry in malaysia, the answer is unlikely, at least for the near future.
The reason could be due to religions, or lost of benefits for certain people in the country if this industry is regulated and legalised. 😉


 

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