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TSthomas910
post Aug 14 2019, 02:43 PM, updated 2w ago

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I am not a photographer and also passionate, But I am Interested to capture some moments with my family, calouges and friends.

So what is the basics point and common angles for great image poses.
Tygrarin
post Aug 16 2019, 01:13 AM

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I am not a professional photographer, but I can advise you.
Try to shoot during sunset or dawn. The light at this time is soft and the shadows lie beautifully.
Try to shoot in dynamics. If you take pictures of people, then ask them to walk, turn around, jump. Make them move. Photos in motion will be much better.
Well, spend a lot of time on processing photos. Even the most unsuccessful photo can be successful.
goldfries
post Aug 16 2019, 10:50 AM

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QUOTE(Tygrarin @ Aug 16 2019, 01:13 AM)
Well, spend a lot of time on processing photos. Even the most unsuccessful photo can be successful.
Not good to head to that path. LOL.

If a photo is bad, it's bad. But some people do spend hours to process a photo but you'll need to actually KNOW your stuff to do that.

goldfries
post Aug 16 2019, 10:51 AM

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QUOTE(thomas910 @ Aug 14 2019, 02:43 PM)
I am not a photographer and also passionate, But I am Interested to capture some moments with my family, calouges and friends.

So what is the basics point and common angles for great image poses.
No hard and fast rule.

Moments are usually split second, take what you got.

If you see a group of people together, you'll probably know them so the useful "skill" would be to anticipate possible reaction and wait for it.
OOtaii
post Aug 16 2019, 12:14 PM

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Totally agree what goldfries said...
U shoot what u want to show/tell story..all subjective..
Try to get everything "right" on camera

This post has been edited by OOtaii: Aug 16 2019, 12:15 PM
TSthomas910
post Aug 20 2019, 08:19 PM

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QUOTE(goldfries @ Aug 16 2019, 10:51 AM)
No hard and fast rule.

Moments are usually split second, take what you got.

If you see a group of people together, you'll probably know them so the useful "skill" would be to anticipate possible reaction and wait for it.
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Thank you, I thought different .
TSthomas910
post Aug 20 2019, 08:20 PM

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QUOTE(OOtaii @ Aug 16 2019, 12:14 PM)
Totally agree what goldfries said...
U shoot what u want to show/tell story..all subjective..
Try to get everything "right" on camera
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It is good to know answered by you, thank you.
goldfries
post Aug 21 2019, 12:40 AM

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QUOTE(thomas910 @ Aug 14 2019, 02:43 PM)
I am not a photographer and also passionate, But I am Interested to capture some moments with my family, calouges and friends.
Keyword is "moment".

Don't be too picky on sharpness, slight blur or imperfections are fine as long as not totally out of focus.

More important is that it's framed.

1. interaction
2. expression
3. background (helps relate points 1 and 2 into a bigger picture)

smile.gif

Anticipation is one skill, reaction is another "skill".

Meaning once you noted a moment happening, be quick to respond. No time to change lens or settings.

One thing people new to photography always mistaken is that they think they must use manual mode to get the best, and this is sadly being harped upon by the "half-baked" ones. sad.gif No, you don't have to use M all the way. Semi-auto modes like Av / Tv (aka priority modes) or even P modes could actually be the better one especially for moments.

Pay so much for camera, let it do some work. biggrin.gif


TSthomas910
post Aug 26 2019, 01:11 PM

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QUOTE(goldfries @ Aug 21 2019, 12:40 AM)
Keyword is "moment".

Don't be too picky on sharpness, slight blur or imperfections are fine as long as not totally out of focus.

More important is that it's framed.

1. interaction
2. expression
3. background (helps relate points 1 and 2 into a bigger picture)

smile.gif

Anticipation is one skill, reaction is another "skill".

Meaning once you noted a moment happening, be quick to respond. No time to change lens or settings.

One thing people new to photography always mistaken is that they think they must use manual mode to get the best, and this is sadly being harped upon by the "half-baked" ones. sad.gif No, you don't have to use M all the way. Semi-auto modes like Av / Tv (aka priority modes) or even P modes could actually be the better one especially for moments.

Pay so much for camera, let it do some work. biggrin.gif
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Nice Information, I seen many of people they manually changed the camera configuration but this is wrong.

LegendLee
post Aug 26 2019, 04:27 PM

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QUOTE(thomas910 @ Aug 26 2019, 01:11 PM)
Nice Information, I seen many of people they manually changed the camera configuration but this is wrong.
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It really depends on context.
Only way to know if to shoot more.

Manual gives you control and consistency at the price of speed. Depending on what you’re shooting, priorities differ.

goldfries
post Aug 27 2019, 12:14 AM

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QUOTE(LegendLee @ Aug 26 2019, 04:27 PM)
Manual gives you control and consistency at the price of speed. Depending on what you’re shooting, priorities differ.
I think what he meant was people try to use manual but end up fumbled around choosing wrong settings. biggrin.gif

goldfries
post Aug 27 2019, 12:15 AM

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QUOTE(thomas910 @ Aug 26 2019, 01:11 PM)
Nice Information, I seen many of people they manually changed the camera configuration but this is wrong.
In the end is know the modes, understand how it works.

And you have to understand the scene or the situation on what works best.

Like in my case, if I shoot events. Without flash I use Av / M mode. With flash I use M mode, whether flash set to TTL or manual also again depends on the scene.

Riggo
post Aug 27 2019, 09:28 PM

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Lighting is very important, best natural soft sunlight time would be morning sunrise and evening sunset starting from 5.30pm which they call the golden hour (my personal favourite hour).

Take note of highlight and shadow, don't go overexposed (especially for digital camera as it's hard to recover the details in overexposed areas) or underexposed (less worries on this as it's easier to recover details for digital).

For angle, just play around with different angles to achieve different results. No hard and fast rule on this.

But for portraits, usually keep a fair distance between camera and the person (but depending on what focal length you use) as the last thing you or the person in the photo wants is face/body not being proportional.

Most important thing is always be aware of your surroundings to notice/predict certain facial or action moments from people and act fast on your shutter button to capture and seize the moment.


Haily Twwiter P
post Sep 6 2019, 11:17 AM

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For me, all I want right now is a phone with good snapshots. The cell phone is convenient for taking daily photos, but my cell phone's snapshot will be burnt, which is very uncomfortable. In addition, I rarely retouch pictures, I usually just adjust the brightness and exposure, I like to restore 100% of the beautiful scenery I saw at that time. biggrin.gif
TSthomas910
post Sep 7 2019, 05:29 PM

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This is good to know natural shoot looks amazing, but we need somewhere that use to edit with according to location.
dvlzplayground
post Sep 8 2019, 06:44 AM

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IMO you don't need to always shoot manual but you need to know how to do it when the need arises. It gives you a better idea of how to correct for shots that the camera can't figure out well.

Think of manual mode as a 'lock' for the exposure settings. Useful for panoramas, stacking, etc.

 

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