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TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:16 AM, updated 5w ago

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This post has been edited by MKLMS: Oct 25 2019, 11:21 PM
TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:17 AM

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TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:17 AM

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TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:18 AM

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lucifer_666
post Jul 7 2019, 11:23 AM

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New thread! Yaaaay!!!
TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:24 AM

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From previous V26 thread...

QUOTE(Fat & Fluffy @ Jul 6 2019, 10:13 AM)



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QUOTE(Fat & Fluffy @ Jul 6 2019, 12:12 PM)
Kremlin says details of submarine fire that killed 14 'cannot be made public'

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MOSCOW (AFP) - The Kremlin on Wednesday (July 3) said that details of a fire that killed 14 crew on a deep-water submersible will not be made public because they include classified information.

The seamen died on Monday in Russia's territorial waters in the country's far-north, but the disaster was only made public on Tuesday.

Officials have given little information about the vessel or the circumstances of the accident, with local media reporting that the ship was a secretive nuclear-powered mini-submarine.
"This information cannot be made public completely," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said of the disaster. "It belongs to the category of state secrets."

Mr Peskov said that President Vladimir Putin was informed immediately after the fire.

"It is completely normal when this kind of information is not made public," Mr Peskov said, adding that this was "within the law of the Russian Federation".

He said that "no decision has been made" about a period of mourning in the northern Russian region.



The Defence Ministry said the 14 crew were killed by inhaling poisonous fumes after a fire broke out on a "scientific research deep-sea submersible" studying the sea floor.

However, the Novaya Gazeta newspaper cited sources as saying that the accident took place on an AS-12 nuclear mini-submarine, which is capable of going to extreme depths.

The presence of many senior ranking officers on board could suggest that the submarine was not on an ordinary assignment.

President Putin has ordered a full investigation into what he called a tragedy.

He appointed Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu to travel to Severomorsk, the restricted-access military port in the Russian Arctic, and direct the probe.

The incident is the latest in a string of disasters and accidents to hit Russia's navy, with echoes of the sinking of the Kursk submarine in 2000 that claimed the lives of 118 personnel and shook the first years of Mr Putin's presidency.

During a meeting with Mr Shoigu on Tuesday, Mr Putin said the submarine in question was "not an ordinary vessel".

"As we know, it's a scientific-research vessel, its crew is highly professional," the Russian leader said.

He said the victims included seven Captain First Rank officers - the most senior staff officers in the Russian navy - and two have been awarded the Hero of Russia, a top title given out by the president.

A military expert who spoke to AFP on condition of anonymity rubbished claims that the fire happened during scientific research.

"Usually it's a cover for different type of work conducted on the seabed", such as laying cables, the expert said.

The fire was put out and the vessel returned to a military base in Severomorsk. It is not known how many were on board the sub.
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TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:37 AM

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QUOTE
KAI LAH conducts maiden flight

04 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Korea Aerospace Industries (KAI) has conducted the maiden flight of its developmental Light Attack Helicopter (LAH) prototype.

The test saw two pilots conduct a 20 minute sortie with the rotorcraft at the company’s Sacheon production facility, says KAI.

The flight test followed a readiness review in June, where the company received approval to get the LAH airborne for the first time.


Link to full news article: KAI LAH conducts maiden flight


QUOTE
India edges forward with rebooted plan to acquire 110 fighters

04 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

The Indian defence ministry’s response to a parliamentary question suggests that a plan to obtain 110 advanced fighters is inching through New Delhi’s bureaucracy.

The response followed a question posted by a parliamentarian regarding India’s ambitions for “public private partnerships” to develop indigenous manufacturing capabilities.

“The evaluation of responses to the request for information (RFI) and finalisation of SQR (Services Qualitative Requirements) have commenced,” said defence ministry official Mohan Naidu Kinjarapu in a written response.


Link to full news article: India edges forward with rebooted plan to acquire 110 fighters


QUOTE
Boeing to produce or remanufacture up to 600 AH-64E Apaches

03 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Garrett Reim Los Angeles

The US Army plans to grant Boeing a multiyear contract for the production or remanufacture of up to 600 AH-64E Apache attack helicopters.

The potential contract’s value was undisclosed, though it would consist of a five-year multiyear contract or one-year contract with options from FY2022 to FY2026, according to a US Army notice online. The army intends on sole sourcing the work to Boeing and posted its plan online so as to give other potentially interested parties a chance to bid.

The AH-64E is a modernised version of the AH-64D. The army is upgrading its attack helicopters to the “E” variant as part of its effort to sustain the Apache fleet through the year 2040.


Link to full news article: Boeing to produce or remanufacture up to 600 AH-64E Apaches
zacky chan
post Jul 7 2019, 11:37 AM

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TSMKLMS
post Jul 7 2019, 11:48 AM

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QUOTE
Serbia outlines Orao modernisation programme

03 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Igor Salinger Belgrade

Serbia's defence ministry has detailed a major upgrade programme being performed on its Soko J-22 Orao combat aircraft and NJ-22 trainers, which will significantly enhance the type's operational capabilities.

Speaking at the Partner 2019 exhibition in Belgrade in late June, Nenad Miloradovic, the defence ministry's assistant for defence technologies, confirmed that the modernisation activity – unofficially dubbed Orao 2.0 – will be conducted in two phases.

Serbia currently has about 10 J-22 and NJ-22 Oraos in an airworthy condition, plus a number of stored airframes, including in the IJ and INJ reconnaissance variants. The platform's expected service life was initially set at 24 years, but structural inspections have indicated that some examples could have this doubled or be approved for a further 1,000 flight hours following overhaul.


Link to full news article: Serbia outlines Orao modernisation programme


QUOTE
NATO AWACS base to trial digital tower technology

03 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Craig Hoyle London

NATO's main operating base for its Boeing E-3A airborne warning and control system (AWACS) fleet is to trial the use of digital tower air traffic control technology next year, with equipment supplied by Swedish venture Saab Digital Air Traffic Solutions.

Describing the contract as the first of its kind for employment at a military facility, the provider says: "NATO air base Geilenkirchen will use the digital tower for live operations during the refurbishment of the current control tower."


Link to full news article: NATO AWACS base to trial digital tower technology


QUOTE
Boeing, Airbus in MoU for future RAAF P-8A sustainment

03 July, 2019 SOURCE: FlightGlobal.com BY: Greg Waldron Singapore

Boeing Defence Australia and Airbus Australia Pacific have agreed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) related to future sustainment of the Royal Australian Air Force's (RAAF's) Boeing P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft fleet.

The pair already deliver an interim sustainment support contract (ISSC), covering the fleet's service entry. The new agreement is aimed at securing a through-life support contract for the type.

The current ISSC deal will expire in October 2020.


Link to full news article: Boeing, Airbus in MoU for future RAAF P-8A sustainment
lucifer_666
post Jul 7 2019, 02:05 PM

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QUOTE
What Can Malaysia Do With 2 Submarines?

Points to ponder for Malaysia’s first Defense White Paper.

By Adam Leong Kok Wey

July 06, 2019


Amid the ongoing public discourse related to the drafting of Malaysia’s first White Paper on Defense, there appears to be renewed interest today in the value of the two Scorpène-class submarines acquired for the Royal Malaysian Navy (RMN) in 2002. There are two views about the RMN’s submarines: one view considers that it is too costly to run a submarine fleet, and the second view questions the strategic value of just having a two-boat submarine fleet. Strategic history, however, will demonstrate that the value of submarines in peace and war lies in the capabilities of submarines to stealthily conduct a wide range of operations that can generate immense strategic effects far above the vessel’s tonnage.

Malaysia’s Scorpène submarines are hunter-killer types and diesel-electric powered. They can operate submerged for up to 21 days. The two Malaysian submarines were completed and delivered in 2009 and 2010, respectively.

Submarines have a multitude of functions such as gathering intelligence; carrying and launching nuclear ballistic missiles – providing a first and second strike capability – as a potent equation in nuclear deterrence strategy; launching land attack cruise missiles (such as the April 14, 2018 Tomahawk attacksagainst Syrian targets by U.S. and British military forces); stealthily infiltrating and exfiltrating special operations personnel; and traditional combat roles in time of war — hunting enemy submarines and sinking enemy surface ships (both naval and merchant), as well as laying mines. Most modern submarine operations focus on underwater intelligence gathering. Because of the covert nature of these operations, most people do not know that a large bulk of submarine operations are used for this role. Because of this secretive nature, the submarine force is commonly dubbed as the “silent service.”

Since the end of World War II, submarines have only twice engaged in sinking enemy ships. The strategic effects of these two sinkings, however, although not spectacular in terms of number or tonnage of ships sunk, had immense psychological impact and managed to garner consequences far above the weight of torpedoes launched.

The sinking of an Indian frigate, the INS Khukri by a Pakistani submarine, the PNS Hangor, in the 1971 India-Pakistan War had forced the Indian Navy to cancel a crucial attack on Karachi port as well as diverting and scattering valuable naval assets to search for and destroy the PNS Hangor. The fact that an enemy submarine, having just successfully sunk a frigate, was lurking in the Arabian Sea was more than enough to fuel the fear of further losses, which led to an intense anti-submarine operation to neutralize the threat.

HMS Conqueror’s sinking of ARA General Belgrano in the early stages of the Falklands War in 1982 likewise gained immense strategic effect for the British forces sailing to recapture the Falkland Islands. The entire Argentinian navy returned to port (including its sole aircraft carrier) and did not dare to venture out again during the Falklands War. Thus Argentina was not able to prevent British naval forces from launching a successful land operation that defeated the Argentinians in the Falklands. As British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher later remarked, “The sinking of the Belgrano turned out to be one of the most decisive military actions of the war.”

Submarines are also very useful in laying mines covertly at vulnerable but important maritime areas such as enemy ports (for blockades) and in narrow chokepoints. Mines have been a very useful naval weapon and were extensively used in some of the major wars and conflicts. A significant number of surface warships, submarines, and merchant ships have been sunk by mines. For example, in World War II, thousands of mines were laid in the Baltic Sea (which was instrumental in blockading Russia), in the Atlantic (to blockade Great Britain), and around Japan (successfully blockading the Japanese islands and cutting off vital war supplies to the Japanese). Mine clearance operations are costly, difficult, and time-consuming. A modern submarine such as the RMN’s Scorpènes can carry up to 30 mines, and in war is able to covertly maneuver into enemy harbors or vital maritime chokepoints to lay its mines at selected critical locations.

Malaysia’s regional neighbors such as Singapore and Indonesia have also procured submarines with respectable operating tempos. The Republic of Singapore Navy has two operational Challenger-class submarines (formerly the Swedish Sjöormenclass) and two Archer-class submarines (formerly the Swedish Västergötland class), and is acquiring four new Type 218SG subs from Germany. Indonesia operates five Type 209 submarines (of different variants) and has signed a contract for an additional three.  Meanwhile, Vietnam operates six Russian-made Kilo-class submarines and Thailand plans to procure up to three Type S26T submarines from China.

These developments in the region support the thesis that Malaysia’s decision to procure the two submarines in 2002 was correct. A long time is needed not just to build a submarine (averaging six years), but also to set up the infrastructure and logistics required to support the submarine fleet, and more importantly to train a capable and experienced submarine crew and maintenance personnel. The RMN pioneering submarine crew reportedly spent four years training in France learning how to operate a submarine. The attrition rate among submariners is also high – the long time spent underwater within confines the size of two train coaches, isolation from the outside world, and its related stress and deprivations are some of the reasons why it is hard to recruit, train, and retain submarine crews.

Since the size of the RMN is small, at around 15,000 sailors, the relative manpower base to source for its submarine personnel is limited. It requires substantial effort, cost, and time to train, maintain, and manage its submarine fleet’s crew.  Hence the current two-boat fleet needs to be viewed realistically not just from the angle of cost affordability and quantitative value but also the necessary manpower required to sustain its operational tempo.

Malaysia has extensive maritime interests and areas to manage, which include the Strait of Malacca and parts of the South China Sea, effectively making Malaysia responsible for some of the most important and busiest maritime sea lanes and critical choke points in the world. The two RMN submarines are essential for Malaysia’s defensive posture, which places importance on the practice of limited sea-control and anti-access naval strategies in selected maritime chokepoints and passageways.

According to the RMN’s “15-to-5 Transformation” plan, Malaysia’s navy will have a four boat submarine fleet by 2050. However, at the moment the RMN has to cope with just two submarines until budgetary funds are available to purchase more submarines and the silent service has enhanced its capacities and capabilities to man and operate a larger submarine fleet.

In view of the strategic utility and strategic history of submarines (that even a lone submarine can generate valuable strategic effects), the two Scorpène submarines, for now, are able to provide the RMN with the vital means to engage in the shadowy business of underwater warfare.

Dr. Adam Leong Kok Wey is an Associate Professor in strategic studies and the Deputy Director of Research in the Centre for Defence and International Security Studies (CDiSS) at the National Defence University of Malaysia.
Source: The Diplomat
Frozen_Sun
post Jul 7 2019, 03:26 PM

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Good animated map on East Front...there are already newer videos until 1944/1945


atreyuangel
post Jul 7 2019, 03:46 PM

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QUOTE(lucifer_666 @ Jul 7 2019, 02:05 PM)
very good piece

oh btw

Reporting in!
azriel
post Jul 7 2019, 05:51 PM

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QUOTE
Indonesian National Police deploys largest-ever vessel for South China Sea patrols

Ridzwan Rahmat, Singapore - Jane's Navy International
04 July 2019

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Yudistira, seen here during its sea trials in early-2019. Source: PT Daya Radar Utama

Key Points

• Indonesia has deployed its largest-ever police patrol vessel to the South China Sea
• The vessel will primarily conduct fishery resources protection duties in the Riau archipelago

The Indonesian National Police's water directorate has deployed its largest-ever patrol vessel, KP Yudistira (8003), to the service's Riau archipelago district command.

The vessel has been operating out of Batam island since mid-June 2019 where it conducts operations in and around the Riau archipelago in the South China Sea including the Natuna Islands cluster, reads a statement issued by the Indonesian National Police's public affairs office.

According to information from its shipbuilder, PT Daya Radar Utama (PT DRU), Yudistira has an overall length of 73 m, an overall beam of 11 m, a draft of 3 m, and a standard displacement of 1,100 tonnes. It was launched by PT DRU at its Tanjung Priok, North Jakarta shipyard on 4 May 2018.


Read more: https://www.janes.com/article/89697/indones...ina-sea-patrols

This post has been edited by azriel: Jul 7 2019, 05:56 PM
kerolzarmyfanboy
post Jul 8 2019, 01:41 AM

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QUOTE
Armed forces the last resort

By Liew Chin Tong
July 7, 2019 @ 11:32pm


I WAS sworn in as deputy defence minister on July 17 last year. Friends and colleagues often ask me: “What do you actually do at Mindef? Nothing much, right? You must be quite free, right?”

I also often joke with members of the armed forces I meet: “Your mother-in-law probably doesn’t know what you do, right?”, to which most of them laugh and agree. Recently, an ex-politician called for demilitarisation and for members of the armed forces to perform labouring tasks that others won’t do.

“Since Malaysia is not going to war under whatever circumstances, the armed forces might as well make themselves useful to society by contributing such services”, or “Women armed forces personnel can help clean up houses and conduct courses for housewives to improve standards of hygiene and enhance their living comfort”.

This, to me, epitomises the lack of understanding of the role of the armed forces by the public, even political leaders. Strangely enough, while many think that the military has nothing much to do, they recognise the effectiveness and efficiency of the armed forces in carrying out assigned duties. The military is expected to be the first responders in handling domestic issues, from tiger poaching to halting irregular migrants and patrolling airports. In other Southeast Asian states, the military has played a major role in running the country, though often not producing the best outcomes for the people.

In the Philippines and Indonesia, the political importance of the military became less apparent only in recent decades, since democratisation in 1986 and 1998 respectively. In Thailand, Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, the government consists of strong military elements, while in Vietnam, the Communist state and the military are intertwined. Singapore has, since its independence, invested heavily in its national service. Hence all male adults, who would have served via mandatory conscription, have some understanding of the armed forces through first-hand experience. In Malaysia, civilian rule of the armed forces is established, and proven in the peaceful transition of government on May 9 last year.

The country is a unique case in Southeast Asia and its position is closer to the role played by the armed forces in mature democracies, such as the United Kingdom and Australia. It is thus, important for us to define the role of the armed forces vis-a-vis other civilian security forces and to ensure that all agencies work hand in hand to complement each other’s functions. In the Malaysian security structure, the police are a singularly centrally commanded force, unlike in many other countries. In Australia, for instance, community policing and crime prevention are a state function. The Malaysian police are effectively a paramilitary force. In Thailand and Indonesia, the police became independent of the armed forces only in the past two decades.

Structurally, our institutional arrangements serve Malaysia well. The downside to this is that Malaysians lack a common understanding of the role of the armed forces. This can be attributed to the long peace Malaysia has had since the Hatyai Accord signed in 1989, which ended the insurgency carried out by the Malayan Communist Party. Paradoxically, the long peace Malaysians enjoyed over the past three decades, with just several small but notable incidents, means that many of us don’t give much thought to the armed forces’ place in society. We, however, have taken peace for granted, not realising that it is actively maintained. Even in peacetime, the armed forces are assisting other agencies and performing tasks such as border duties, and contributing to global stability via the United Nations peacekeeping operations. They are often the unsung heroes that provide insurance coverage to the nation.

Malaysia has held a non-aligned foreign policy posture since the 1970s, even at the height of the Cold War, and has put much more emphasis on diplomacy than on any need to showcase military might in dealing with other countries. But this should not discount the importance of the armed forces training to be ready for any scenario of war or conflict, and to conduct what is called defence diplomacy activities with other countries. Indeed, the primary role of the armed forces is to prepare and to train for war.

Contrary to the perception that members of the armed forces “sit in their barracks and have nothing to do”, they train daily, involving themselves in exercises, patrolling borders, going on operations assigned to them and carrying out secondary duties to provide military assistance to civil authorities. I spent a night on board KD Jebat and KD Mahawangsa in October last year, and that experience has reinforced my belief in providing better family housing for military personnel (Rumah Keluarga Angkatan Tentera, or RKAT). I came to know that these ships had been sailing for more than a month when they picked me up. In fact, some ships sail more than 200 days a year.

During the sailing period, the sailors had no phone, Internet or any contact with their families. Imagine that they had to worry about their wives and children back home, who have to struggle with leaky roofs and faulty locks and worry about petty crime in the neighbourhood. The same goes for army personnel guarding the outposts at the Sarawak-Kalimantan border and the Malaysian-Thai border. I visited these outposts, and saw that many of the soldiers are on operations and are away from their families for six months in a year (often on two-month rotation, if not more), and even
when they are back at their camps, they work from Monday to Friday.

The armed forces, being the most organised force in the country, should provide assistance to civilian authorities and conduct operations other than war, such as during a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief. But we need to clarify the primary and secondary roles of the military and at what stage they need to be involved. We need to realise that the military is the last resort, not the first responders. A military man in uniform is of course a very impressive persona and this certainly has a deterrence effect on all sorts of criminals or in any disaster relief effort. What is needed, really, is for us to ensure that our civilian security organisations are so well prepared and so able that we need to deploy the military only last, not first.

Deploying the military has a cost usually unseen by the public or even government leaders. When on operations, military personnel do not really have time to dedicate to training. Being constantly in ops and not having time to train means that they won’t have the readiness needed in the event a military operation is called for. The nation as well as the government need to have clear strategic priorities and objectives for guiding the armed forces in their actions. As a society, we will also have to shed the idea that soldiers are an advanced version of cheap labour. The truth is, it is costly to train a soldier, and rightly so as wars are increasingly sophisticated and requires highly skilled and smart soldiers. Each time we deploy them, we need to think of them as a special and highly skilled group and not as labourers at our free disposal.

During former prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s craze over Professor W. Chan Khim’s “Blue Ocean Strategy”, there were two glaring examples of clear ignorance about the role of the armed forces that we should avoid, going forward. Chan Khim wrote at length in his book “Blue Ocean Shift” about how great it was getting the Malaysian army to set up six prisons in six different camps and using the armed forces to discipline prisoners, purportedly to ease overcrowding in our prisons, without taking into consideration that military personnel are not trained as professional prison managers like the prison officers. The other “Blue Ocean” folly was to get the paratroopers — one of the most extensively trained elite groups — to guard airports as a “show of presence” effort. I am very glad that the current government ended this foolish approach this year.

Unfortunately, the Defence Ministry in the past had been a quiet market place for past ministers to broker multibillion ringgit arms deals, buying big toys that the soldiers themselves did not actually want. The more secretive this was, the better it was for past governments. Hence, defence news only surfaced when it involves some corruption scandals, which is another reason that contributed to the public’s lack of understanding of the Armed Forces. The Defence Ministry and the Armed Forces need to do more to explain to the public, to civil servants and political leaders, of their roles and responsibilities. One of Defence Minister Mat Sabu’s major efforts since taking office is to draft a Defence White Paper which will be presented to parliament later this year. It will help to clarify to the nation what we actually want the armed forces to do. This is a very positive move. However, a lot more engagement is needed if we are to lessen the public’s ignorance and to guard the integrity of the armed forces.

The writer is deputy defence minister.


SOS: NST
azriel
post Jul 8 2019, 01:13 PM

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QUOTE
Sunday, July 7, 2019

Philippines to purchase 6 new NC-212i light lift aircraft from PTDI

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The PAF plans to order another 6 units of NC-212i from Indonesia's PTDI. Photo c/o PTV News.

The Philippine Air Force (PAF) announced its plans to acquire six (6) new NC-212i light lift aircraft from Indonesian aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PTDI).

PAF chief Lt. Gen. Rozano Briguez confirmed that deliveries of 6 new NC-212i aircraft will be arriving starting 2020. This was during the 72nd Founding Anniversary ceremonies on 02 July 2019 in Manila.

The PAF already operates 2 NC-212i aircraft it ordered in 2014. Back then, deliveries were delayed due to changes in the autopilot system and requires re-certification using a new autopilot system.


Read more: https://www.asiapacificdefensejournal.com/2...c-212i.html?m=1

zacky chan
post Jul 8 2019, 01:54 PM

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QUOTE(kerolzarmyfanboy @ Jul 8 2019, 01:41 AM)
SOS: NST
*
at least he got good point there.

hm....agree to much of the points he stated but saying and doing is different things...its easy to say but hard to do...even before i have heard some aide or assistant(someone involve with politician) of some politician involve with mindef acknowledge the problem with our procurement especially the things we choose instead what armed force need and want, but the deal go through. some do try and bring toward meeting but at the end of the day, its up to 'you know who'.

also...good luck trying to get the citizen to know much about defense. now its up to politician to get things done...armed force have BTDM,airtimes,FB page and other media which good job so far. hope the politician will get their act together and quote/share/support everything these media done to show support and make people aware what we have here...

the defense white paper(KPP) and the deal for LCA,MPA and MALE UAV will be the benchmark of how far can the new govt able to walk the talk. it will be interesting if the MPA and UAV will get decent enough money to get what the service want laugh.gif


atreyuangel
post Jul 8 2019, 02:44 PM

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QUOTE(kerolzarmyfanboy @ Jul 8 2019, 01:41 AM)
SOS: NST
*
Sorry lah, article panjang2 tapi isi takda pastu selit masuk politik
in the end tulis salah previous governmnet

dengan white paper ni pun banyak highlight apa yang orang nak dengan ATM bukan apa yang ATM mahu jugak chin tong weh. White paper ni pada aku buang masa je dah ada doktrin Hanruh tu

NBOS bukan a total lost pun, it is actually promoted better relation between government agencies

cuba tengok banjir 2012 and 2013, even before MKN orders are up the NBOS formula is working

ohh I forget, you have to actually be there to see this and not sitting somewhere just make noise

KLIA Para formula was inducted in NBOS not as just show off force but as a consideration after a high profile heist in KLIA not too long before it was introduce. Plus this show off force is actually done by many country after 11 september.

Hais ingatkan ok dia sbg DMOD, rupanya kulit aja isi tarak, kosong, yilek
but still better then the MOD.. haha
zacky chan
post Jul 8 2019, 03:58 PM

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QUOTE(atreyuangel @ Jul 8 2019, 02:44 PM)
Sorry lah, article panjang2 tapi isi takda pastu selit masuk politik
in the end tulis salah previous governmnet

dengan white paper ni pun banyak highlight apa yang orang nak dengan ATM bukan apa yang ATM mahu jugak chin tong weh. White paper ni pada aku buang masa je dah ada doktrin Hanruh tu

NBOS bukan a total lost pun, it is actually promoted better relation between government agencies

cuba tengok banjir 2012 and 2013, even before MKN orders are up the NBOS formula is working

ohh I forget, you have to actually be there to see this and not sitting somewhere just make noise

KLIA Para formula was inducted in NBOS not as just show off force but as a consideration after a high profile heist in KLIA not too long before it was introduce. Plus this show off force is actually done by many country after 11 september.

Hais ingatkan ok dia sbg DMOD, rupanya kulit aja isi tarak, kosong, yilek
but still better then the MOD.. haha
*
coming from the political party he is, its good enough what he write..also when compare to mat sabu,at least LCT is good laugh.gif

any good news you heard about our KPP???its silent....and i dont like when the h000haaa govt that we have silent on it...no teaser or anything even from malaysiandefence blog
atreyuangel
post Jul 8 2019, 04:04 PM

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QUOTE(zacky chan @ Jul 8 2019, 03:58 PM)
coming from the political party he is, its good enough what he write..also when compare to mat sabu,at least LCT is good  laugh.gif

any good news you heard about our KPP???its silent....and i dont like when the h000haaa govt that we have silent on it...no teaser or anything even from malaysiandefence blog
*
no not yet, hopefully soon
pening skerang nih

macam headless chicken pun ada
aiyaiyai...

bukechi
post Jul 8 2019, 04:07 PM

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is it really got beautiful private ?

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