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> Software testing roles, That don't require any experience

poooky
post Aug 8 2018, 10:53 AM, updated 2w ago

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Currently in a non related field and want to make the switch. End goal would be something in development, but that is pretty far off. Thus I'm leaning on getting my foot in the door through an entry level testing position as a way to supplement my self learning for the eventual jump.

All relevent jobstreet ads require at least a Cs degree and experience with loads of test software. Even manual tester roles. Nevertheless I still apply to them and as expected no replies.

Am I looking in the wrong place? Or maybe I'm reaching to the wrong people as most jobs are locked behind hr gatekeepers who blindly follow a prereq list of tech buzzwords. Or do I need to go for a cert first? But that wouldn't make sense as certs are designed for those already in the field.

Any guidance from those in the industry would be appreciated.
ragk
post Aug 8 2018, 11:10 AM

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"locked behind hr gatekeepers who blindly follow a prereq list of tech buzzwords"
I would say yes, 99% of the company behave so.

Instead of spamming random company u should research for tech company with open culture, where cert doesn't matter but passion and attitude do. I did, but only once, many years back saw a company recruiting programmer without demanding college education and giving high pay. Search for those company and get ur entrance ticket.
anti-informatic
post Aug 8 2018, 12:20 PM

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What's ur actual specialization in the IT field right now? This is important to know if u are really suitable to be a tester that company need.

I think u need to clearly define the two type of tester:

1. Front end/general testers - people usually don't look for them unless is huge companies looking for massive people to test and provide feedback on the User Experience (UX) of a product

2. System testers - perform specific system testing method such as performance/stress test, penetration test, etc on a system to further improve it

So which type of position u apply for, what type of tester work u expecting to do, and what's ur current skill?
poooky
post Aug 8 2018, 02:07 PM

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QUOTE(ragk @ Aug 8 2018, 11:10 AM)
"locked behind hr gatekeepers who blindly follow a prereq list of tech buzzwords"
I would say yes, 99% of the company behave so.

Instead of spamming random company u should research for tech company with open culture, where cert doesn't matter but passion and attitude do. I did, but only once, many years back saw a company recruiting programmer without demanding college education and giving high pay. Search for those company and get ur entrance ticket.
*
Thanks. Did you self learn programming before you got in? How long did you stay in that company? If you don't mind I'd like to know more of your story.


poooky
post Aug 8 2018, 02:22 PM

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QUOTE(anti-informatic @ Aug 8 2018, 12:20 PM)
What's ur actual specialization in the IT field right now? This is important to know if u are really suitable to be a tester that company need.

I think u need to clearly define the two type of tester:

1. Front end/general testers - people usually don't look for them unless is huge companies looking for massive people to test and provide feedback on the User Experience (UX) of a product

2. System testers - perform specific system testing method such as performance/stress test, penetration test, etc on a system to further improve it

So which type of position u apply for, what type of tester work u expecting to do, and what's ur current skill?
*
Thanks for the clarification. Most of the testing stuff I read on google probably pertains to general testing.

I'm in a non tech related field right now. No relevant skills. I applied to all testing positions I come across. Long term aiming to be a developer. Looking to get my foot in the tech industry through software testing for the hands on experience to speed up my learning.

I singled out software testing as most of the job scope seems like it can be learned on the job - stuff like using programs to run the actual tests.
ragk
post Aug 8 2018, 04:04 PM

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QUOTE(poooky @ Aug 8 2018, 02:07 PM)
Thanks. Did you self learn programming before you got in? How long did you stay in that company? If you don't mind I'd like to know more of your story.
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I mean i did saw this kind of recruiting, not my experience lol. Im IT degree graduated
anti-informatic
post Aug 8 2018, 05:55 PM

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QUOTE(poooky @ Aug 8 2018, 02:22 PM)
Thanks for the clarification. Most of the testing stuff I read on google probably pertains to general testing.

I'm in a non tech related field right now. No relevant skills. I applied to all testing positions I come across. Long term aiming to be a developer. Looking to get my foot in the tech industry through software testing for the hands on experience to speed up my learning. 

I singled out software testing as most of the job scope seems like it can be learned on the job - stuff like using programs to run the actual tests.
*
Sounds like u are taking software testing as a stepping stone to become a developer. If this is ur ideal path, guess the general UX tester not gonna help much for u to be a developer because UX is mainly focus on front end, while developer need to know a lot about the back-end.

Based on my limited experience, company would prefer to hire experienced developers to do system testing job because experience developers have good understanding on what to test and how system should work. While general UX tester provide feedback on how they feel from the way they use the system and how they expect the system to behave, experienced developer need to provide detail on how to improve the system from performance, security & other aspects. So they need to provide idea & suggestion where the IT team can improve the system in a practical manner.

That's all I know about the reason why companies would hire experienced developers to be tester.

If ur final aim is to be a developer, I think usually it's better if u focus on learning programming skill right away. Since tester & developer can be completely different path
pufferfish
post Aug 8 2018, 10:02 PM

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QUOTE(poooky @ Aug 8 2018, 02:22 PM)
Thanks for the clarification. Most of the testing stuff I read on google probably pertains to general testing.

I'm in a non tech related field right now. No relevant skills. I applied to all testing positions I come across. Long term aiming to be a developer. Looking to get my foot in the tech industry through software testing for the hands on experience to speed up my learning. 

I singled out software testing as most of the job scope seems like it can be learned on the job - stuff like using programs to run the actual tests.
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let me know if you still looking for a tester job
WongGei
post Aug 10 2018, 10:05 AM

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If you want to become a developer, what you need is just a computer, broadband and lots of sleepiness nights. Don't use tester as a stepping stone. Programmer and tester require different skillsets.
I suggest you go online and do some self learning, make 1 or 2 application to gain some experience. My company interviewed a lot of candidates. The most important thing I will test them for their programming skill and problem solving skill. We are small and look for people who can help and not come to learn.
kingkingyyk
post Aug 10 2018, 09:52 PM

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QUOTE(poooky @ Aug 8 2018, 02:22 PM)
Thanks for the clarification. Most of the testing stuff I read on google probably pertains to general testing.

I'm in a non tech related field right now. No relevant skills. I applied to all testing positions I come across. Long term aiming to be a developer. Looking to get my foot in the tech industry through software testing for the hands on experience to speed up my learning. 

I singled out software testing as most of the job scope seems like it can be learned on the job - stuff like using programs to run the actual tests.
*
Testing techniques require you to know some programming logic. If you do static analysis, you will need to understand what does the part of the code do, in order to point out possible conditions that might not be covered.
Now, we have devops that puts testing into part of development, and that requires tester to write automated tests to reflect the impact of the change to the developer. This also requires programming skill.

It turned out that opposite way is much better. With the experience of being programmer, you can easily create many corner & tricky test cases to drive the programmer mad.

This post has been edited by kingkingyyk: Aug 10 2018, 09:55 PM

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