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> changing gas stove to induction cooker, cabling advice needed

ozak
post Dec 29 2017, 01:24 PM

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QUOTE(halcyon27 @ Dec 29 2017, 11:07 AM)
Well put and said. That's why in dry, I like the idea of using induction esp for non Asian style cooking and esp what you have mentioned before cooking maggi.😄 It's cleaner for the kitchen and kinder to the utensils. We steam cook lots hence we a use separate 3 tier steam cooker. For the "wok breath" requirement, due to insistence of the chef, I had to bow to the demand of a powerful hob as we had been using a 5kW 3 ring tornado flame Rinnai before. To her, the frying on induction was meh so I bought a table top 7kW one for frying. No regrets there and like avocado says, out in the open so it's in the balcony.
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Been using induction for 10yrs. I still have the gas hob in the kitchen with the rusty gas tank. (For display only)

We seldom fried thing. So doesn't require high heat most of the time. The only high heat is boiling water.

Once go in to induction, will never go back to gas stove.

But since seldom cook, the bill is still pretty low.
watabakiu
post Jan 2 2018, 08:48 PM

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QUOTE(tuo850 @ Dec 27 2017, 10:08 PM)
how does the electric bill gonna cost?
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Have been using induction for the longest time. Electricity cost is cheaper than LPG, and less hassle.
CPN
post Jan 2 2018, 09:48 PM

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QUOTE(halcyon27 @ Dec 29 2017, 11:07 AM)
Well put and said. That's why in dry, I like the idea of using induction esp for non Asian style cooking and esp what you have mentioned before cooking maggi.😄 It's cleaner for the kitchen and kinder to the utensils. We steam cook lots hence we a use separate 3 tier steam cooker. For the "wok breath" requirement, due to insistence of the chef, I had to bow to the demand of a powerful hob as we had been using a 5kW 3 ring tornado flame Rinnai before. To her, the frying on induction was meh so I bought a table top 7kW one for frying. No regrets there and like avocado says, out in the open so it's in the balcony.
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I disagree that the taste from frying on induction hob is 'meh'. The cooking vessel matters too. A cast iron skillet on an induction hob is one of the best thing that I found for anything fried. The induction hob is always precise and the cleanup is just like wiping a table. The taste of food from cast iron skillet is the same regardless of the heat source.
ozak
post Jan 2 2018, 10:35 PM

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QUOTE(watabakiu @ Jan 2 2018, 08:48 PM)
Have been using induction for the longest time. Electricity cost is cheaper than LPG, and less hassle.
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Not really. Actual calculation is electrical cost higher than LPG.

Induction is just more efficiency than others electrical stove to compare.
ozak
post Jan 2 2018, 10:38 PM

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QUOTE(CPN @ Jan 2 2018, 09:48 PM)
I disagree that the taste from frying on induction hob is 'meh'. The cooking vessel matters too. A cast iron skillet on an induction hob is one of the best thing that I found for anything fried. The induction hob is always precise and the cleanup is just like wiping a table. The taste of food from cast iron skillet is the same regardless of the heat source.
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If you're a Chinese you can understand what is "wok hei" that kind of taste.

If you're not, than you won't be know it.

Induction can't create that kind of "wok hei" taste.
advocado
post Jan 2 2018, 10:41 PM

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QUOTE(CPN @ Jan 2 2018, 09:48 PM)
I disagree that the taste from frying on induction hob is 'meh'. The cooking vessel matters too. A cast iron skillet on an induction hob is one of the best thing that I found for anything fried. The induction hob is always precise and the cleanup is just like wiping a table. The taste of food from cast iron skillet is the same regardless of the heat source.
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what about Ceramic? is Ceramic less fiery than Induction and is electricity bill higher with Ceramic of equivalent rating?
halcyon27
post Jan 3 2018, 10:37 AM

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QUOTE(CPN @ Jan 2 2018, 09:48 PM)
I disagree that the taste from frying on induction hob is 'meh'. The cooking vessel matters too. A cast iron skillet on an induction hob is one of the best thing that I found for anything fried. The induction hob is always precise and the cleanup is just like wiping a table. The taste of food from cast iron skillet is the same regardless of the heat source.
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I agree with what you said but there's still a certain taste that still somehow eludes those who cooks using city gas and induction or any electrical hob. It needs a certain heat intensity which before this comes from a strong flame. Even a 5kW hob barely unlocks this.

The type of material used in the utensils you highlighted matters but for the wok kitchen cook perspective, it works in combination with the heat intensity delivered.

I first became aware of this after hearing the anecdotes of friends and ex-colleagues who came back from overseas and almost always they hit the kopitiam immediately for a plate of fried kuey teow. In finding out why, the answer is always the same. The CKT cooked on their own don't taste as good as back here in the kopitiams. Most use city gas and some induction where they are from. Then, this term always pops up: wok hei.

I was actually intrigued at first but then I slowly came to roughly understand that perhaps it is a phenomenon where somehow the intensity of the heat delivered through the hob where they live could not unlock that certain aroma esp from the siham (cockle or kerang) like those from the wok burners the hawkers use. There are at least two types of wok burners commonly used which is seen: multi ringed and multi port burners.

This post has been edited by halcyon27: Jan 3 2018, 12:02 PM
ozak
post Jan 3 2018, 11:07 AM

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QUOTE(halcyon27 @ Jan 3 2018, 10:37 AM)
I agree with what you said but there's still a certain taste that still somehow eludes those who cooks using city gas and induction or any electrical hob. It needs a certain heat intensity which before this comes from a strong flame. Even a 5kW hob barely unlocks this.

The type of material used in the utensils you highlighted matters but for the wok kitchen cook perspective, it works in combination with the heat intensity delivered.

I first became aware of this but after hearing the anecdotes of friends and ex-colleagues who came back from overseas and almost always they hit the kopitiam immediately for a plate of fried kuey teow. In finding finding out why, the answer is always the same. The CKT cooked on their own don't taste as good as back here in the kopitiams. Most use city gas and some induction where they are from. Then, this term always pops up: wok hei.

I was actually intrigued at first but then I slowly came to roughly understand that perhaps it is a phenomenon where somehow the intensity of the heat delivered through the hob where they live could not unlock that certain aroma esp from the siham (cockle or kerang) like those from the wok burners the hawkers use. There are at least two types of wok burners commonly used which is seen: multi ringed and multi port burners.
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It is the behaviour of the fire that heat up the cookware.

A gas fire heat the way on the wok is very much different from the flat induction cooker. Which is just 1 flat surface.

Another very good example is the charcoal fried hokkien mee vs gas fried hokkien mee. A very obvious different taste.
halcyon27
post Jan 3 2018, 11:38 AM

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QUOTE(ozak @ Jan 3 2018, 11:07 AM)
It is the behaviour of the fire that heat up the cookware.

A gas fire heat the way on the wok is very much different from the flat induction cooker. Which is just 1 flat surface.

Another very good example is the charcoal fried hokkien mee vs gas fried hokkien mee. A very obvious different taste.
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Agree and perhaps because the charcoal in itself already pack a whopping amount of embedded energy released when properly stoked and fanned.
1tanmee
post Jan 12 2018, 07:46 PM

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QUOTE(ozak @ Jan 2 2018, 10:35 PM)
Not really. Actual calculation is electrical cost higher than LPG.

Induction is just more efficiency than others electrical stove to compare.
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But taken other things into consideration, and not electricity cost alone, I find induction to be easier. I seldom cook, and finds it a hassle to send empty tong gas and carry full tong back. But yes, on cost alone, LPG is cheaper

ozak
post Jan 12 2018, 08:52 PM

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QUOTE(1tanmee @ Jan 12 2018, 07:46 PM)
But taken other things into consideration, and not electricity cost alone, I find induction to be easier. I seldom cook, and finds it a hassle to send empty tong gas and carry full tong back. But yes, on cost alone, LPG is cheaper
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I know,.

I change to induction since 10yrs ago.

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