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> Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio)

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TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 02:32 AM, updated 5y ago

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Preface and symptoms
A client brought in a Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker system for repair. Main problem is the speaker system cannot be powered up at all. Usually many people would assume that it was due the fuse blown whenever their equipment lost all power, however very often that is not the case. The fuse on this speaker system is easily accessible from outside (right under the power socket) and the fuse was found to be OK. Thus the fault is definitely internal (possibly on the power supply board).

First look inside
The first thing to do is to look at the power supply board. This speaker system uses SMPS (switched-mode power supply) for all its power requirements. There are two SMPS sections on this board, one for standby power and the other for power amplifiers. As with other Creative GigaWorks series, a relay is used to switch on/off the power to the power amplifier section.
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The light blue thingy labeled "Goodsky" is the relay.


Visible signs of failed components
Right away can see those big CapXon HP series capacitors in various stages of bulging, a blown diode and lots of degraded glue (the brown stuff). The design of that heatsink towering over the capacitors would have easily caused to capacitors to bulge due to prolonged heat exposure from the toasty heatsink. Anyway CapXon is not a good capacitor brand at all and is very well known for bad capacitor problems. In fact, its very common to see failed CapXon capacitors in many electronic equipment such as computer PSUs, LCD monitors, AC-to-DC adapters, etc...
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Bulging capacitors, blown diode and degraded glue on the primary side.


Beware of degraded glue
Thus, why repeatedly the concern on degraded glue? Because degraded glue can become conductive and creates all sorts of weird problems (including short circuits)! You can read more about it here: Conductive Glue Carnage. Thus removal of degraded glue was essential.

One of the snubber network ceramic capacitors literally cracked and fell apart into pieces when removing more degraded glue...
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This is what was left after degraded glue was removed. One of the ceramic capacitor legs can still be seen there.


Degraded glue and standoffs plus GND connection equals trouble
These standoffs are connected to the aluminium heatsink and to GND rail! Thus the degraded glue around other standoffs had to be removed to prevent current and future problems.
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Metallic standoff with connection to heatsink and GND!

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The plastic standoff with degraded glue removed reveals a pad to GND connection also!

Its also possible that the diode blew due to degraded glue plus that metallic standoff (which is connected to GND!). This is the closeup of the blown diode and the blob of degraded glue that extends all the way to the metallic standoff. This diode is in the primary high voltage section! The diode is blown to beyond recognition (very little left of the markings). Later I did found out the actual part number for this diode from schematics...
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More signs of possible future problems
Simply said, more CapXon junk. These capacitors with blue sleeve are all CapXon GS series 85C general purpose type which are not really suited for SMPS (switched-mode power supply) usage. Usually for SMPS, they should be higher temperature 105C low ESR or low impedance type. How did Creative engineers get away with this? Notice those disc-shaped ceramic capacitors besides them? By using ceramic capacitors in parallel to serve/function as the low ESR side! Anyway its quite common to see this configuration in some power supplies (as a method of cost cutting).
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Capacitors for the power amplifier side right after the rectifiers...

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Capacitors for the standby power side right after the rectifiers. The cracked ceramic capacitor and degraded glue were cleaned up as well.

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Capacitors for the standby power output side right after the linear voltage regulators.

Besides those CapXon, there were also a Su'scon SL series 85C general purpose capacitor and a S.J.E RH series 105C general purpose capacitor. Thus my recommendation to the client was also to replace/upgrade all those el-cheapo crap capacitors with high quality low ESR and low impedance capacitors suitable for SMPS.

This post has been edited by lex: Aug 12 2013, 09:35 PM
TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 11:31 AM

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Removal of failed components and cleaning up degraded glue
All the failed components (those big CapXon HP series capacitors and blown diode) were removed and degraded glue cleaned up. Even another big CapXon capacitor (KM series) which did not show signs of bulging was removed as well for capacitor upgrade. Notice the area where the glue was removed had traces and exposed solder pads (add to that, this is the primary high voltage section)!
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Cleaned and ready for new components.

This is the blown diode area under the board. There were leftover solder paste on the PWM power I.C that indicates a previous repair. Also previously there was a blob of degraded glue at the standoff on the right, which I've cleaned up (ie. the previous repairer did not remove the degraded glue around that area). Notice its next to the high voltage traces and solder pads! Definite recipe for current and future disaster.
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Ready for new diode and capacitor upgrade.

These are components (mostly capacitors and a blown diode) that were pulled out. The blown diode (broken into two pieces) is in the bottom foreground. Most of the capacitors are CapXon brand, while one of them was Su'scon brand. There was the odd S.J.E brand capacitor (small one with black sleeve) which most probably was from a previous repair.
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Destined for the junk yard. Two of the big capacitors were bulged quite significantly that they could not stand up straight on their tops.


Replacements
The capacitor replacements were all high quality Japanese capacitors (which took some time to arrive after placing the order). Both the original (blown) diode and the new replacement diode have 1A current rating. However the original (blown) diode had 400V DC blocking voltage rating, while the new diode had much higher specifications with 1000V DC blocking voltage rating.
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Brand new Panasonic TS-ED series capacitors and new diode. Also a brand new Nichicon CS series capacitor on the far right

Bought a new PWM power I.C (its a TOP243YN) for standby, just in case it was that I.C that caused the diode to blow in the first place. Already checked most of the components after the (blown) diode and they seem fine. However the state of the PWM power I.C was unknown (very difficult to check I.Cs). Also had to be wary of ceramic capacitor C6, although measures fine (on the capacitance meter), could have possible breakdown/leakage at higher voltages and cause the diode to blow (again).

Capacitor upgrade
As per recommendation, all CapXon and other el-cheapo brand capacitors were removed and then replaced with high quality Japanese capacitors...
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Rubycon ZLJ series for the power amplifier side right after the rectifiers.

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Nichicon HE series for the standby power side right after the rectifiers. A new ceramic capacitor to replace the cracked one as well.

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Nichicon PS series and HE series for the standby power side right after the linear voltage regulators.

There was another CapXon GS series 85C general purpose capacitor right next (very close) to the toasty heatsink. Thus that was replaced with a very high temperature 150C ceramic capacitor. Notice the bits of residual degraded glue sticking to some of those components on the right. This area previously also had lots of degraded glue as well (already removed and cleaned).
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In the centre, the small yellow ceramic capacitor is an AVX AR series 150C high temperature capacitor.


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 28 2013, 11:31 PM
TSlex
post Jul 5 2013, 01:09 PM

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Putting it back together
The power supply board is placed back together with the power amplifiers and interface on the subwoofer unit, ready for testing...
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Back in place and connected.

Another look inside the Creative GigaWorks S750 subwoofer unit. This speaker system uses a triple voice coil woofer!
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There are three pairs of wires connecting the woofer!


Testing and its fixed!
The moment of truth! Connect the power and switch on the power switch at the back, then finally the standby LED light comes up. Pressing the POWER button and the unit is fully switched on (can also hear the relay clicked inside). Feed it with some music and ran it for hours (ie. burn-in test). This speaker system can get pretty toasty as I could feel the heat on the speaker enclosure wood surface. Eventually this speaker system has been returned to the client.

Miscellaneous
Noticed that the power amplifier boards has lots of el-cheapo crap capacitors as well. This time its Jun Fu brand. Just lots of them, big and small. More cost cutting by Creative IMHO. Replacing them would take even more time and increase the burden (due to more component upgrade cost) on the client. The glue remains white in color thus had not degraded yet (possibly a different glue than the one used on the power supply board). My conclusion at the moment is to leave it like that...
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Jun Fu everywhere on the power amplifier boards, even the small black ones!


Ending notes
Another repair done, though I would consider this a little easy (although the glue removal part was a tedious task). I hope that you'll find this article interesting and informative. icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jul 6 2013, 01:55 PM
Quazacolt
post Jul 5 2013, 07:27 PM

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awesome article/review, giving hopes to every creative gigaworks 5.1/7.1 series owners thumbup.gif thumbup.gif
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 08:03 PM

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Second Creative GigaWorks S750 speaker comes in for repair
Another client (a lowyat.net forummer) brought in another Creative GigaWorks S750 speaker. The main problem with his unit was "soft" and broken/distorted bass. He had tried repairing the speaker power supply himself using this guide since he found bulged capacitors also.

Incorrect components and bad repair
Unfortunately he did not follow everything in this guide, including the replacement components used/selected. First off, the four capacitors used for the amplifier power section were 85C rated (while the original capacitors were 105C rated) and was oversized (too tall). Also note there were still degraded glue remaining as well. See image below...

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Possibly fake Marcon capacitors. Can't find any information for "CEFTW-Q" series.

The top of the capacitors not only touched the heatsink, but was also pushing/bending the heatsink backwards and stressing the MOSFETs on the heatsinks. Also do beware that this type of condition must be avoided at all costs. Primarily the electrolyte inside the capacitors will start boiling due to direct heating from contact with the heatsink. This can cause electrolyte degradation and evaporation, as well as possibly capacitor explosion since the vents on the top of the capacitors were blocked by the heatsink.

This is the view from the side below. Note the heatsink is bending backwards due to the oversized capacitors. Can also see the small capacitor which I've mentioned earlier (the first unit repaired) that was very close to the heatsink, plus still lots of degraded glue in critical areas close to the transformer there.

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Not a pretty sight, especially the degraded glue areas.

Having 105C temperature rating on a capacitor does not always qualify as suitable for SMPS (switched mode power supply) capacitors. These MaxCap MKR series are actually 105C general purpose capacitors. Again, these capacitors were also oversized (too wide).

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These are actually general purpose capacitors, also note the glue underneath.

Degraded glue
There were still a lot of degraded glue in areas where there are exposed solder pads and traces, plus close to those standoffs which are connected to GND. The most critical ones are in the primary high voltage section. In short, he did not follow closely my guide on repairing.

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Degraded glue across the mains input terminals!

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This area contains the SMPS feedback actually.

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There were also degraded glue at the secondary low voltage side.


Remaining original capacitors
There were still those original CapXon GS capacitors that were 85C general purpose type. Besides CapXon there were three small Su'scon SL series capacitors (85C general purpose also). Usually I would recommend replacing them with low impedance/ESR capacitors as this speaker system uses SMPS (switched mode power supply).

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Note that "blob" of degraded glue on the left, actually contains a ceramic capacitor inside!

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More CapXon 85C general purpose capacitors. The small one is a Su'scon.


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 20 2013, 10:05 PM
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 09:40 PM

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Component removal and degraded glue cleanup
All images are self explanatory. When removing the capacitors, I've found the solder pads were damaged (peeled and came off very easily) due to the owner's self-repair, possibly placing the soldering iron on the pads too long and did not use any solder flux for faster de-soldering. When soldering and/or desoldering always try not to heat up the board too much as it can melt the glue that held the solder pads and traces. Any jaded and dirty solder joint can take time to melt, thus always use solder flux to allow the solder to melt easily and faster.

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The pads on the top row are goners. No connection at all.

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Incorrect capacitors removed. Note the damaged pads on the top layer as well.

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No more degraded glue. Critical areas cleaned.

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Mains input area cleaned as well.


Capacitor replacements
Just as before, all electrolytic capacitors were replaced with proper high quality ones.

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The same Panasonic TS-ED series as in the first repair.

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Instead of Nichicon CS series, this time I used Panasonic ED series for the standby power section. Other replacements remains the same. Degraded glue cleaned up here as well.

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Another change, this time using Panasonic FM series. Luckily that ceramic capacitor did not crack during glue removal (unlike the first one)...

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And this time Nichicon PW series here...

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And lastly, Rubycon ZLH series instead of Rubycon ZLJ series....


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 03:29 AM
TSlex
post Aug 20 2013, 11:07 PM

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Subwoofer problem
The main reason the subwoofer sounded broken and distorted was that all 3 voice coils inside the 8" woofer were damaged. At first diagnostics, 2 out of 3 voice coils were dead (no connection at all). During test of the sound channels, the 3rd voice coil finally gave up. Decided remove the woofer to check. When pressing down slightly on the woofer cone can hear scratchy and scraping sounds, indicating the voice coil wires have become loose and/or broken.

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The spoiled woofer...

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Triple terminals for triple voice coils...

Since this is a voice coil problem, and furthermore triple voice coil then its going to be very tedious and time consuming to repair (especially the coil rewinding part with multiple layers for each voice coil). I've decided to send this woofer to speaker repair specialist instead. Have other repairs to attend to also.

More problems - sound channel randomly goes off
Also noticed the sound in some of the channels randomly goes missing/gone. Looking around the audio processor board, I noticed there were signs of degraded glue on the connectors. See the images below. Even though the glue does not seem degraded, it can be very deceptive as I found out there were actually degraded glue underneath. Wiggling the cables around, I found the fault easily. Chemicals from that degraded glue vaporised by heat (generated by the power amplifiers and power supply section) during usage corroded the connectors. The pins all looks dark and not shiny at all. Its not easy to clean these oxidized connectors.

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Don't be fooled. Scrape it off to find brownish degraded glue underneath!

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The connectors are no longer shiny, can see multiple colors due to oxidation...

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More oxidized connectors, on the power amplifier board, revealed during degraded glue cleanup


Putting it back together
The woofer was finally repaired and brought back. Time to assemble everything together.

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Partially assembled. Those wires hanging are for the woofer,.

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The repaired woofer back in place. The dust cap doesn't look as pretty as before though due to repairs.


Testing and its done.
Switch the speaker on and run feed some test audio signals to it, and the bass comes rumbling shaking everything in the room. Finally, its done.

user posted image


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 12:35 AM
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 03:28 AM

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lex, have you asked if creative wanna hire you? you're definitely doing a way better job (and by that i mean they've done pretty much nothing at all lol) compared to the folks at creative
ADJ
post Aug 21 2013, 10:34 AM

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very interesting. My old Megaworks 550THX had a similar issue, apparently the blown cap spilled its guts all over the PCB...so now it's consigned to my storeroom, dunno what to do with it, with 5 excellent condition satellites, heh...
andrekua2
post Aug 21 2013, 12:35 PM

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Bro,

How do you remove those glue? I seen them spread on a large surface with many components and pcb traces. Scraping them or using chemical solution?

Thanks you.
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 12:51 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 03:28 AM)
lex, have you asked if creative wanna hire you? you're definitely doing a way better job (and by that i mean they've done pretty much nothing at all lol) compared to the folks at creative
*
I think they already expect these not to last long, as with other manufacturers. Probably they expect the user to buy new one after the speaker is spoiled. wink.gif

QUOTE(ADJ @ Aug 21 2013, 10:34 AM)
very interesting. My old Megaworks 550THX had a similar issue, apparently the blown cap spilled its guts all over the PCB...so now it's consigned to my storeroom, dunno what to do with it, with 5 excellent condition satellites, heh...
*
Which PCB? Is it the power section or the amplifier section? hmm.gif

QUOTE(andrekua2 @ Aug 21 2013, 12:35 PM)
How do you remove those glue? I seen them spread on a large surface with many components and pcb traces. Scraping them or using chemical solution?

Thanks you.
*
Just very slowly, carefully and meticulously scrape it off. Have to be aware of components under the glue. Sometimes have to temporarily desolder the components in order to clean. Quite often very time consuming. See example below... icon_rolleyes.gif

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Before. Note the brown spots on the on top of the glue, those are signs of degraded glue underneath...

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After...


This post has been edited by lex: Aug 21 2013, 01:14 PM
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 21 2013, 12:51 PM)
I think they already expect these not to last long, as with other manufacturers. Probably they expect the user to buy new one after the speaker is spoiled. wink.gif
*
and THATS where i don't get them, there's NO NEW ONE LOL.

the only new multi channeled 5.1/7.1 creative are releasing are their non gigaworks series which typically have shit SQ. sure, people don't generally expect SQ from multi channels/gaming speakers, and they are way cheaper than the gigaworks series, but some people (like me) who does, are just out of luck.

the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
power911
post Aug 21 2013, 04:11 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
*
this nod.gif nod.gif nod.gif

This post has been edited by power911: Aug 21 2013, 04:24 PM
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 04:43 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
and THATS where i don't get them, there's NO NEW ONE LOL.

the only new multi channeled 5.1/7.1 creative are releasing are their non gigaworks series which typically have shit SQ. sure, people don't generally expect SQ from multi channels/gaming speakers, and they are way cheaper than the gigaworks series, but some people (like me) who does, are just out of luck.
Nowadays manufacturers try to cut cost as much as possible (just compare Altec Lansing of yesteryears with Altec Lansing today for example). Also these GigaWork and MegaWork speaker systems use multi-voice coil woofers which are rare and expensive. wink.gif

QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 02:01 PM)
the only alternatives i can see are edifier (which i absolutely hate their mids, having a huge gap between highs/low freq and their sub response is quite poor although the SPL is pretty good, potentially better than creative's ) or logitech (overpriced, and the new z906 is having way too many negative feedback to my liking)
*
The midrange depends on the design of the ampliifer system (especially the high pass filter section) and primarily the drivers themselves. For good midrange, the drivers have to be of certain minimum size (diameter) and depth. Nowadays with most 2.1, 5.1 and 7.1 systems, the drivers in the satellite speakers are pretty small. Thus many would note the missing or hollow midrange. Replacing those tiny satellites speakers with a bigger one may give you back that midrange. As for modifications, besides the satellite speakers also very much depends on the amplifier system as well. If the preamp section for the satellites has a high pass filter then you try changing its cutoff frequency. Sometimes its the satellites that determine the sound. For example, on the Edifier M3300 there are lack of high pass filters for the satellites in the preamp section, thus its the satellites that determines the midrange and tweeter frequencies. icon_rolleyes.gif
Quazacolt
post Aug 21 2013, 05:20 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 21 2013, 04:43 PM)
Nowadays manufacturers try to cut cost as much as possible (just compare Altec Lansing of yesteryears with Altec Lansing today for example). Also these GigaWork and MegaWork speaker systems use multi-voice coil woofers which are rare and expensive. wink.gif

The midrange depends on the design of the ampliifer system (especially the high pass filter section) and primarily the drivers themselves. For good midrange, the drivers have to be of certain minimum size (diameter) and depth. Nowadays with most 2.1, 5.1 and 7.1 systems, the drivers in the satellite speakers are pretty small. Thus many would note the missing or hollow midrange. Replacing those tiny satellites speakers with a bigger one may give you back that midrange. As for modifications, besides the satellite speakers also very much depends on the amplifier system as well. If the preamp section for the satellites has a high pass filter then you try changing its cutoff frequency. Sometimes its the satellites that determine the sound. For example, on the Edifier M3300 there are lack of high pass filters for the satellites in the preamp section, thus its the satellites that determines the midrange and tweeter frequencies. icon_rolleyes.gif
*
hence you can see my reluctance in replacing my gigaworks LOL

as for the mods, sounds like a lot of work and the cost may even exceed the speakers set themselves :/
TSlex
post Aug 21 2013, 05:43 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Aug 21 2013, 05:20 PM)
as for the mods, sounds like a lot of work and the cost may even exceed the speakers set themselves :/
*
Replacing the satellite speakers are easy (a piece of cake, as one would say). But changing the cut-off frequency on the amplifier system very much depends on the design of the amplifier itself. If its a simple passive or active RC filter network then very easy (usually either resistor and/or capacitor change only). But if its controlled by a DSP in some digital systems, then its either very difficult, or just not applicable. hmm.gif

rlewin
post Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM

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Lex, I stumbled on your post while trying to find anything that can help me with my own sets of these. I have a few questions.
Are there any schematics for the Amp boards?
Do you have a comprehensive component list I can use to locate replacement Capacitors (I have no electronics training but I know what looks bad)
Apart from ordering capacitors with the same uf, voltage, heat rating and dimensions I have no idea what I need.
I have my original set and over the last year have purchased 3 other sets of these because they are great (when they work)
Any guidance you can give me will be most appreciated.
Cheers
Rod
TSlex
post Aug 27 2013, 06:32 PM

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QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
Lex, I stumbled on your post while trying to find anything that can help me with my own sets of these.  I have a few questions.
Are there any schematics for the Amp boards?
Nopes, I don't have the schematics for the power amplifier boards. Since those are BASH amplifier I.Cs, the circuit layout and components used are very straight forward (follows closely the datasheet for the BASH amplifier I.C). wink.gif

QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
Do you have a comprehensive component list I can use to locate replacement Capacitors (I have no electronics training but I know what looks bad)
Apart from ordering capacitors with the same uf, voltage, heat rating and dimensions I have no idea what I need.
All the capacitors that needs to be replaced already mentioned here (with the exception of the big ceramic capacitors at the standby power section, and the film capacitors at the main power section). Make sure get correct/proper replacement capacitors. Just replace what is required, and highly recommend replacing all those CapXon and Su'scon brand capacitors even if they still look good. Roughly... icon_idea.gif

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink

Still, depending on the fault and symptoms then you have to check other parts/components as well (e.g. MOSFET failure which is not mentioned here). hmm.gif

QUOTE(rlewin @ Aug 27 2013, 07:57 AM)
I have my original set and over the last year have purchased 3 other sets of these because they are great (when they work)
Any guidance you can give me will be most appreciated.
Cheers
Rod
*
Seems to be common to see this model with lots of problems. Some even tried the hair dryer treatment which I do not recommend at all, as it may eventually kill/destroy the components inside. Since you have 3 other sets to tinker with, there's a lot of room to try out and learn... icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Aug 27 2013, 08:22 PM
rlewin
post Aug 28 2013, 05:30 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 27 2013, 08:32 PM)
Nopes, I don't have the schematics for the power amplifier boards. Since those are BASH amplifier I.Cs, the circuit layout and components used are very straight forward (follows closely the datasheet for the BASH amplifier I.C). wink.gif

All the capacitors that needs to be replaced already mentioned here (with the exception of the big ceramic capacitors at the standby power section, and the film capacitors at the main power section). Make sure get correct/proper replacement capacitors. Just replace what is required, and highly recommend replacing all those CapXon and Su'scon brand capacitors even if they still look good. Roughly...  icon_idea.gif

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink

Still, depending on the fault and symptoms then you have to check other parts/components as well (e.g. MOSFET failure which is not mentioned here).  hmm.gif

Seems to be common to see this model with lots of problems. Some even tried the hair dryer treatment which I do not recommend at all, as it may eventually kill/destroy the components inside. Since you have 3 other sets to tinker with, there's a lot of room to try out and learn...  icon_rolleyes.gif
*
Many thanks for the advice and tips, I hope I can resurrect these sets by following your guide. Wish there was a better way to remove that glue.
Cheers
Rod
rlewin
post Sep 3 2013, 05:54 AM

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Lex, in your second repair you noticed the pads were gone, how did you deal with that? I have a similar situation.
Cheers
Rod
TSlex
post Sep 3 2013, 02:08 PM

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QUOTE(rlewin @ Sep 3 2013, 05:54 AM)
Lex, in your second repair you noticed the pads were gone, how did you deal with that?  I have a similar situation.
Cheers
Rod
*
Did you use any solder flux and/or solder paste during desoldering? What was the desoldering tool used? For the top layer, scrape a bit of solder resist off to near the hole expose some fresh copper (has to be shiny). Clean with isopropyl alcohol. With help of solder flux, put some solder on the exposed copper. Make sure the solder sticks to the exposed copper (if not then clean and try again). Make an "L" shape wire from any scrap leads (must be of good thickness). Solder one side of the "L" wire on the fresh exposed copper already tinned with solder. The other end should be through the hole. Make sure the snap-in legs can fit thru the hole with that "L" wire together. May not look pretty but gets the job done. Check the image below... tongue.gif

user posted image
Seeing double? That's an extra wire in the through hole...


This post has been edited by lex: Sep 3 2013, 07:09 PM
rlewin
post Sep 3 2013, 07:03 PM

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I used my soldering iron and a solder sucker, but I think you're right and it got too hot. I'll follow your instructions to repad the hole.
Thanks Lex.
Oh, I just had another set of these speakers turn up. With the help of your post and a lot of luck I hope to have all four sets running again.
I'll let you know how I go.
Cheers
Rod
TSlex
post Sep 3 2013, 07:46 PM

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QUOTE(rlewin @ Sep 3 2013, 07:03 PM)
I used my soldering iron and a solder sucker, but I think you're right and it got too hot.  I'll follow your instructions to repad the hole. 
Thanks Lex.
Remember the solder flux... tongue.gif

QUOTE(rlewin @ Sep 3 2013, 07:03 PM)
Oh, I just had another set of these speakers turn up. With the help of your post and a lot of luck I hope to have all four sets running again.
I'll let you know how I go.
Cheers
Rod
*
If you are going to use ceramic type for that 0.1uF capacitor, then make sure the ceramic dielectric is either NP0/C0G (most prefered but quite costly for 0.1uF radial leaded part), X7R, X8R (high temperature type which was the one used here) or U2J (new kid on the block, almost as good as C0G/NP0). Avoid those with Y5V, Z5U and X5R dielectric as their capacitance can drift wildly (very large variations) with temperature. icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 3 2013, 08:03 PM
rlewin
post Sep 6 2013, 04:49 AM

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Thanks Lex, I'll make sure to check the specs:)
Galeak
post Sep 8 2013, 02:08 AM

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Hi !
I need help.
I have a problem with Creative Gigaworks S750.
I turn button on from 230V, led turns in green - ok. At power on from remote, sistem turns on then automatic turns off. If I turns once again from remote, sistem turns on and is works normally.At these resets, audio levels is setting to default.
All capacitors from power board was checked with a ESR Meter and is it ok. No blown(balloon) capacitors.
Change only (at ESR meter it was ok):
- 4x 470uF 200V 105C
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C
Same problem. What could be?
Thanks !
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post Sep 8 2013, 02:55 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 02:08 AM)
I have a problem with Creative Gigaworks S750.
I turn button on from 230V, led turns in green - ok. At power on from remote, sistem turns on then automatic turns off. If I turns once again from remote, sistem turns on and is works normally.At these resets, audio levels is setting to default.
First and foremost, did you remove the degraded glue from critical areas especially the feedback section? Also check for degraded glue on the audio processing board, in particular those that touch/adhere to the I.Cs on the PCB... wink.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 02:08 AM)
All capacitors from power board was checked with a ESR Meter and is it ok. No blown(balloon) capacitors.
Change only (at ESR meter it was ok):
- 4x 470uF 200V 105C
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C
Same problem. What could be?
*
Besides the ESR reading, check the capacitance of those capacitors below 100uF. Do check that 0.1uF capacitor that is very close to the heatsink (also part of the feedback section), and recommend replacing it as well (with a better capacitor). Also what was the replacement capacitor brand and series used? hmm.gif
Galeak
post Sep 8 2013, 05:57 PM

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Hi!
I don't think it is from glue, because impedance measurement in hi - Mohm show me no value.
The problem was from the beginning, 4 years ago, but not agresive like now.
At that time - 2009, sistem is reset perhaps once at two months.
Capacitor 0.1 uF show me an ESR 100nF - is ok.
Audio system is protected by an UPS -APC from 2009.
Uploaded the problem on the youtube. Look at the link
www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNjoj4JKqFY
TSlex
post Sep 8 2013, 07:04 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 05:57 PM)
I don't think it is from glue, because impedance measurement in hi - Mohm show me no value.
The problem was from the beginning, 4 years ago, but not agresive like now.
At that time  - 2009, sistem is reset perhaps once at two months.
Yes or no? Did you clear/clean the degraded glue first? Here's a re-quote from my first post... hmm.gif
QUOTE(lex @ Jul 5 2013, 02:32 AM)
Beware of degraded glue
Thus, why repeatedly the concern on degraded glue? Because degraded glue can become conductive and creates all sorts of weird problems (including short circuits)! You can read more about it here: Conductive Glue Carnage. Thus removal of degraded glue was essential.
*
And here's another user from long time ago, refer to his/her post here... wink.gif
QUOTE(bad2dbone @ Mar 24 2008, 08:59 PM)
Well guys the official news is out. My amp+sub is fixed. My brother in law btw is the electrician mention that the glue on the power source melted due to heat and shorted something inside. Cleared up the glue and it good as new.
*
Beacuse the degraded glue can create "phantom components" and/or "phantom circuits". Add to that, many test meters do not operate in the high voltage range and not at all/entire frequency ranges. tongue.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 05:57 PM)
Capacitor 0.1 uF show me an ESR 100nF - is ok.
Because that capacitor is an electrolytic type plus very close to the heatsink. Not the ESR reading but the capacitance reading because its rectifying/smoothing the feedback signals from the opto-isolator. All electrolytic capacitors can vary their capacitance and ESR greatly with temperature, And usually for electrolytics, its capacitance increases and ESR decreases with higher temperatures. That's why I've asked about the smaller capacitors there, especially that 0.1uF because its part of the SMPS feedback section. Also you have not told us the brand and series of the replacement capacitors. unsure.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 05:57 PM)
Audio system is protected by an UPS -APC from 2009.
Uploaded the problem on the youtube. Look at the link
www.youtube.com/watch?v=GNjoj4JKqFY
*
Doesn't matter whether there's an UPS, AVR (voltage regulator) and/or external power filter because the internal power supply already has power filter as well as inrush current protection. Looking at that video, are those volume level lights flickering? blink.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 9 2013, 02:22 AM
Galeak
post Sep 8 2013, 10:38 PM

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Hi !
This is the capacitor values:
4x470uF/200V 105 C, KSC
5x220uF/35V Low Esr 105C, SAMWHA
5x100uF/35V Low Esr 105C, SAMHWA
1x47uF/25V Low Esr 105C, SAMHWA

About video on youtube ... leds flickering from the frame rate processing. smile.gif
I will try to remove glue with hot air.
Next week I will change: 2x330uf/100V, 68uF/450V, 100nF/50V - X7R 10% -- instead of 0.1uF/50V.
I asked a question. Can I change 2x330v/200V SAMWHA instead of 2x330uF/100V ?
Thanks!
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post Sep 8 2013, 11:13 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 10:38 PM)
This is the capacitor values:
4x470uF/200V 105 C, KSC
5x220uF/35V  Low Esr 105C, SAMWHA
5x100uF/35V  Low Esr 105C, SAMHWA
1x47uF/25V  Low Esr 105C, SAMHWA
KSC (King-Sun) and Samwha? Those are not good capacitors. Not recommended at all.... shakehead.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 10:38 PM)
About video on youtube ... leds flickering from the frame rate processing. smile.gif
I will try to remove glue with hot air.
Those degraded glue are not hot glue. You have to slowly scrape them off actually. doh.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 8 2013, 10:38 PM)
Next week I will change: 2x330uf/100V, 68uF/450V, 100nF/50V - X7R 10% -- instead of 0.1uF/50V.
I asked a question. Can I change 2x330v/200V SAMWHA instead of 2x330uF/100V ?
*
You can use capacitors with higher voltage rating but do not use Samwha. doh.gif Use original capacitors from Nichicon, Panasonic, Nippon Chemicon and/or Rubycon. Also make sure they are of the correct series also (as shown in my guide here). wink.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 8 2013, 11:15 PM
Galeak
post Sep 9 2013, 03:38 AM

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Hi!
I forget to tell you.... 3 months ago I hear like an explode at power on 230V but dont find no one capacitor problem. Now after clean from glue, find a capacitor 471K( ESR say 476 pF)/250V/400V without a pin. In that space it is a problem, dont know where is the second link to the capacitor. See the images. Do you have any pictures ?
Thanks!

This varistor is compatible: JVR14N471K Varistor 300V AC; 385V DC instead of 471k/250V/400V ?
This is more better: VAR10-300 Varistor:metal-oxide; THT; 300V AC; 385V DC; 470V; ±10%; 2.5kA


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TSlex
post Sep 9 2013, 03:07 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 9 2013, 03:38 AM)
I forget to tell you.... 3 months ago I hear like an explode at power on 230V but dont find no one capacitor problem. Now after clean from glue, find a capacitor 471K( ESR say 476 pF)/250V/400V  without a pin. In that space it is a problem, dont know where is the second link to the capacitor. See the images. Do you have any pictures ?
*
Remember the blown diode in my post? I've already suspected that it was due to that degraded glue. That is a safety "Y capacitor". The markings "471" denotes 0.47nF or 470pF. The "second link" is connected to the primary GND (sometimes referred to as "hot" GND), which is that through hole you've pointed out in the attached picture. For replacement, use a certified safety Y capacitor of the same capacitance (0.47nF or 470pF), and not just any plain capacitor. wink.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 9 2013, 04:25 AM)
This varistor is compatible: JVR14N471K Varistor 300V AC; 385V DC instead of 471k/250V/400V ?
This is more better: VAR10-300 Varistor:metal-oxide; THT; 300V AC; 385V DC; 470V; ±10%; 2.5kA
*
Nopes! They are not the same! Inadvertantly may cause a disaster if you use it instead of a proper/correct replacement (possibly electrical shock and/or causing the mains circuit breaker to trip). doh.gif Varistors are for the mains input section and there's already an existing one on that power supply board. Anyway, what's your level of electrical/electronics knowledge? hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 9 2013, 03:09 PM
Galeak
post Sep 9 2013, 11:14 PM

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The "second link" connected to the primary GND is only from the right photo ? In the left photo no second link ?
This is ok 470pF/400V capacitor, Y1, CY1Y-470P 400V instead of 471K ?
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post Sep 10 2013, 01:27 AM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 9 2013, 11:14 PM)
The "second link" connected to the primary GND is only from the right photo ? In the left photo no second link ?
See the image below, this is from a 3rd unit that came in for repair... hmm.gif

user posted image
Should be easy to see where the leads are located for that Y capacitor.


QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 9 2013, 11:14 PM)
This is ok 470pF/400V capacitor, Y1, CY1Y-470P 400V instead of 471K ?
*
If its a certified Y capacitor then it should be fine. Example of a safety X/Y capacitor here: TDK CD series... icon_rolleyes.gif

rlewin
post Sep 13 2013, 04:54 AM

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I am learning so much here rclxms.gif

Galeak
post Sep 14 2013, 03:42 PM

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Hi Lex !
Changed all capacitors from the power board,removed the glue, same problem. At power on from remote, relay start then stops fast.
Do you have a schematic (circuit) diagram for power board ?
Thanks.
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post Sep 15 2013, 01:25 AM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 14 2013, 03:42 PM)
Changed all capacitors from the power board,removed the glue, same problem. At power on from remote, relay start then stops fast.
Still using those (crappy) Samwha capacitors? How many times did the relay clicked? After the initial power on from standby, there should only be one click (to indicate the relay switching on). This relay is gets its power from the secondary side of the standby section, thus all problems should point back to the standby section. Did you remove any degraded glue on the the other boards, besides the power supply board? hmm.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 14 2013, 03:42 PM)
Do you have a schematic (circuit) diagram for power board ?
Thanks.
*
Try this link here: Index of /S750 PSU/Power Supply Schematics... wink.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 15 2013, 01:34 AM
Galeak
post Sep 15 2013, 02:02 AM

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I remove glue from the board where there are many capacitors >30 pieces.At power 230V don't hear relay. only from power remote = 2 clicks (power on - power off , very fast). I think it is a circuit remote problem. At next power on from remote, audio sistem works normally.

This post has been edited by Galeak: Sep 15 2013, 02:04 AM
TSlex
post Sep 15 2013, 02:34 AM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 15 2013, 02:02 AM)
I remove glue from the board where there are many capacitors >30 pieces.At power 230V don't hear relay. only from power remote = 2 clicks (power on - power off , very fast). I think it is a circuit remote problem. At next power on from remote, audio sistem works normally.
*
There are also glue on the I/O board (where the audio input and output connectors as well as the external control pod interface connector is located). Have you checked that one? Should be only a single click when pressing the power on from the control pod. There could be some problems either with the remote control line, standby section and/or simply a weak relay. You will need to check/monitor the control signal to that transistor controlling the relay. hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 15 2013, 02:36 AM
Galeak
post Sep 17 2013, 12:25 AM

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Hi Lex!
Transistors near the relay is ok. check the D6,D7 - BR100 = bad diodes.

This post has been edited by Galeak: Sep 17 2013, 01:45 AM
rioven
post Sep 17 2013, 12:39 AM

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Hi lex..i do wonder where do u repair subs..dont have any idea where to repair
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post Sep 17 2013, 01:07 AM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 17 2013, 12:25 AM)
Hi Lex!
Transistors and components near the relay is ok.
I dont know what it is the problem.Could be a fault CI from the remote.
*
Just monitor the base of the transistor. If there is voltage at the base (at least 0.55V or higher) when the relay goes off (clicked for the second time), then could be the relay. Otherwise monitor the +9V rail which powers the relay (for any relatively large voltage dips when the relay is switched on) . If both turns out OK then the fault could be from the control section (mostly MCU controlled, which is much more difficult to diagnose). hmm.gif

QUOTE(rioven @ Sep 17 2013, 12:39 AM)
Hi lex..i do wonder where do u repair subs..dont have any idea where to repair
*
For your information, I do repair speakers and subwoofers. Just PM me for details if interested... wink.gif
Galeak
post Sep 20 2013, 01:11 AM

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Hi Lex !
I change the diodes D6,D7 now it is ok. Thank you very much !!!

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post Sep 20 2013, 12:50 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Sep 20 2013, 01:11 AM)
Hi Lex !
I change  the diodes D6,D7 now it is ok. Thank you very much !!!
*
Those are diacs actually. Never thought those on the main power section (for power amplifiers) could affect the standby functions. I guess the MCU also monitors the main power section as well. Will take note of that... wink.gif
Galeak
post Sep 21 2013, 04:11 PM

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Yes. I made a mistake it is diacs. Replace 2xBR100/03 with 2xDB3.

Hi Lex !
ASUS sound cards is more better like Creative ?
ASUS Xonar D2X, 7.1 - is a good sound card ?
It is safe to use hot silicon on the capacitors?
Thanks.


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post Oct 7 2013, 01:14 PM

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QUOTE(Galeak @ Oct 5 2013, 08:27 PM)
ASUS sound cards is more better like Creative ?
ASUS Xonar D2X, 7.1  - is a good sound card ?
Usually those ASUS cards are rated better than Creative ones. The only Creative soundcard that is considered fine (can be recommended) is the Titanium HD. Others like those from ESI Audio (which now owns AudioTrak) and Echo Audio are also recommended as they are considered HiFi and studio quality. You can also use an external DAC, either using SPDIF (optical, coaxial) or USB connection. You can try inquiring here as well: Special Interest -> Home Entertainment -> Audiophiles -> Headphone Amplifier and DAC Recommendation, portables, desktops, amps, dac, lai (Headphones)... wink.gif

QUOTE(Galeak @ Oct 5 2013, 08:27 PM)
It is safe to use hot silicon on the capacitors?
Thanks.
*
Can be used for ceramics, but not recommended for the "lytics" (short for electrolytic capacitors). You do not want to boil the electrolytes inside those capacitors. tongue.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Oct 7 2013, 03:34 PM
rlewin
post Oct 15 2013, 05:33 AM

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Lex,
Got one set of 750's going thanks to your very detailed walkthrough but have come up against a problem with another. No Power and no obvious problems on the board. When I turn it on, I get nothing, no light blink or anything that might suggest power to the box. I tried the lead, the fuse, and still nothing. I know next to nothing about what is what or how to test things, I only know if something doesn't look right replace it. Any clues what I should be doing here to diagnose it?
Cheers
Rod
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post Oct 17 2013, 02:38 PM

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QUOTE(rlewin @ Oct 15 2013, 05:33 AM)
Got one set of 750's going thanks to your very detailed walkthrough but have come up against a problem with another. No Power and no obvious problems on the board.  When I turn it on, I get nothing, no light blink or anything that might suggest power to the box.  I tried the lead, the fuse, and still nothing.  I know next to nothing about what is what or how to test things, I only know if something doesn't look right replace it.  Any clues what I should be doing here to diagnose it?
*
The usual troubleshooting procedures, for example check for failed components and check whether there is output voltage on the secondary standby side (if none then check voltage at transformer, then if none then check voltage at primary standby side, etc... etc...) hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Oct 17 2013, 02:38 PM
Kahlid74
post Dec 4 2013, 11:27 AM

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Very cool finding this thread.

Lex, you give a spec list of the capacitors to get however I didn't see a brand you recommend. Could you steer me in the direction of a brand that you think is a good quality?

Also, what type of Ceramic resistors should I get for the orange ones and the diode?

What about the Mosfets? They look kind of funky on the bottom, are they fine and just need a cleanup job or do I need to replace them as well?

Thanks for your time!

UPDATE: and I'm a dolt as I see you listed what type of capacitors you got. Where did you buy them from? I want to make sure if I buy them I get the right ones.

This post has been edited by Kahlid74: Dec 4 2013, 11:39 AM
TSlex
post Dec 4 2013, 01:38 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 4 2013, 11:27 AM)
Very cool finding this thread.

Lex, you give a spec list of the capacitors to get however I didn't see a brand you recommend.  Could you steer me in the direction of a brand that you think is a good quality?
For capacitors, look for brands like Nichicon, Panasonic (also known as Matsushita), Rubycon, Nippon Chemi-Con (also known as United Chemi-Con, formerly Marcon), and Sanyo (nowadays known as Suncon). icon_idea.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 4 2013, 11:27 AM)
Also, what type of Ceramic resistors should I get for the orange ones and the diode?
So far had not had to replace any resistors, except for that 0 Ohm link. As for resistors, depends on the original resistor being replaced and should follow the wattage of the original resistor (in other words, the size of the resistor determines the wattage). The diode is pretty much run-of-the-mill 1N4004, which is a very common diode. wink.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 4 2013, 11:27 AM)
What about the Mosfets?  They look kind of funky on the bottom, are they fine and just need a cleanup job or do I need to replace them as well?

Thanks for your time!
That one very much depends on whether you're going to replace them, and/or depends on the fault/problem itself. The "funky" look is mostly leftover excess flux and not degraded glue. If any of those MOSFETs had blown/failed then you will need to replace them. hmm.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 4 2013, 11:27 AM)
UPDATE: and I'm a dolt as I see you listed what type of capacitors you got.  Where did you buy them from?  I want to make sure if I buy them I get the right ones.
*
Try online stores such as RS Components, Farnell/Newark/element14, Mouser and Digikey. They are guranteed to sell original capacitors (and not those Pasar Road counterfeits). icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Dec 4 2013, 01:41 PM
Kahlid74
post Dec 4 2013, 07:43 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 4 2013, 12:38 AM)
For capacitors, look for brands like Nichicon, Panasonic (also known as Matsushita), Rubycon, Nippon Chemi-Con (also known as United Chemi-Con, formerly Marcon), and Sanyo (nowadays known as Suncon).  icon_idea.gif

So far had not had to replace any resistors, except for that 0 Ohm link. As for resistors, depends on the original resistor being replaced and should follow the wattage of the original resistor (in other words, the size of the resistor determines the wattage). The diode is pretty much run-of-the-mill 1N4004, which is a very common diode. wink.gif

That one very much depends on whether you're going to replace them, and/or depends on the fault/problem itself. The "funky" look is mostly leftover excess flux and not degraded glue. If any of those MOSFETs had blown/failed then you will need to replace them. hmm.gif

Try online stores such as RS Components, Farnell/Newark/element14, Mouser and Digikey. They are guranteed to sell original capacitors (and not those Pasar Road counterfeits). icon_rolleyes.gif
*
Awesome LEX, thanks so much!

What about this guy, would I need to replace it?
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post Dec 5 2013, 08:02 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 4 2013, 07:43 PM)
Awesome LEX, thanks so much!

What about this guy, would I need to replace it?
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
Just change all those 85C capacitors to ones rated for higher temperatures, such as 105C ones (as shown in my guide here). Preferable to use those with high ripple current handling and/or low ESR type, as this speaker uses switching mode power supply... icon_rolleyes.gif

Kahlid74
post Dec 5 2013, 08:33 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 5 2013, 07:02 AM)
Just change all those 85C capacitors to ones rated for higher temperatures, such as 105C ones (as shown in my guide here). Preferable to use those with high ripple current handling and/or low ESR type, as this speaker uses switching mode power supply... icon_rolleyes.gif
*
What about the guy at C52, the ceramic resistor that is chipped away on top?
k3lvinNdad
post Dec 5 2013, 09:47 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 08:33 PM)
What about the guy at C52, the ceramic resistor that is chipped away on top?
*
That is Ceramic capacitor=) btw how can it become like that??lol
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post Dec 5 2013, 10:56 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 08:33 PM)
What about the guy at C52, the ceramic resistor that is chipped away on top?
*
That's not a "ceramic resistor", but a ceramic disc capacitor. Just replace with another one, of the same capacitance. Usually should be 100nF or 0.1uF, 50V or higher. wink.gif

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post Dec 5 2013, 11:14 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 5 2013, 09:56 AM)
That's not a "ceramic resistor", but a ceramic disc capacitor. Just replace with another one, of the same capacitance. Usually should be 100nF or 0.1uF, 50V or higher. wink.gif
*
Per your first post I have tracked down all of the capacitors except 2x 47uF 25V, what brand did you use for this? Here is my shopping list: Does it look right?

• - 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
○ This one had two sizes. I chose the fatter/shorter ones. Correct choice?
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Panaso...%2fxKQ%252bI%3d
• - 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=100ZLJ330M12.5X35&vendor=1189
• - 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
○ I choose cut tape for these, is that right?
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=UHE1V221MPD&vendor=493
• - 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
○ I choose cut tape for these, is that right?
http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/UPS1V101MPD1TD/493-11570-1-ND/4319749
• - 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=UCS2W680MHD&vendor=493
• - 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
○ ??
• - 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink
http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=AR205F104K4R&vendor=478


k3lvinNdad
post Dec 5 2013, 11:22 PM

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digikey shipping exp if i am not mistaken
Kahlid74
post Dec 5 2013, 11:35 PM

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QUOTE(k3lvinNdad @ Dec 5 2013, 10:22 AM)
digikey shipping exp if i am not mistaken
*
exp?
TSlex
post Dec 5 2013, 11:39 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 11:14 PM)
Per your first post I have tracked down all of the capacitors except 2x 47uF 25V, what brand did you use for this?  Here is my shopping list:  Does it look right?

• - 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
  ○ This one had two sizes.  I chose the fatter/shorter ones.  Correct choice?
  ○ http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Panaso...%2fxKQ%252bI%3d
This one is incorrect as its rather wider than the original. The diameter should be 22mm otherwise the capacitors will not fit together. Should be this 22mm diameter version (if using Mouser): Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Snap In > Panasonic EET-ED2D471BA... wink.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 11:14 PM)
• - 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
  ○ I choose cut tape for these, is that right?
  ○ http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=UHE1V221MPD&vendor=493
Incorrect one again, as the lead pitch is 3.5mm. Should get the version with 5mm lead pitch. Digikey > Capacitors > Aluminum Capacitors > UHE1V221MPD6... icon_idea.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 11:14 PM)
• - 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
  ○ ??
*
Look for Nichicon HE series, like this one: Digikey > Capacitors > Aluminum Capacitors > UHE1E470MDD. icon_rolleyes.gif

k3lvinNdad
post Dec 5 2013, 11:39 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 11:35 PM)
exp?
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expensive...but i am not sure... hmm.gif
Kahlid74
post Dec 5 2013, 11:59 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 5 2013, 10:39 AM)
This one is incorrect as its rather wider than the original. The diameter should be 22mm otherwise the capacitors will not fit together. Should be this 22mm diameter version (if using Mouser): Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Snap In > Panasonic EET-ED2D471BA... wink.gif

Incorrect one again, as the lead pitch is 3.5mm. Should get the version with 5mm lead pitch. Digikey > Capacitors > Aluminum Capacitors > UHE1V221MPD6... icon_idea.gif

Look for Nichicon HE series, like this one: Digikey > Capacitors > Aluminum Capacitors > UHE1E470MDD. icon_rolleyes.gif
*
Awesome, thanks man! I'll look to place orders today. For the ceramic disc capacitor would this guy work? - http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/6...EDSA-ND/1545918

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post Dec 6 2013, 03:28 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 5 2013, 11:59 PM)
Awesome, thanks man!  I'll look to place orders today.  For the ceramic disc capacitor would this guy work? - http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/6...EDSA-ND/1545918
*
If you are talking about the cracked ceramic disc capcitor replacement then it would work. Like I've mentioned earlier just any 100nF or 0.1uF ceramic capacitor of 50V or higher rating can be used (even those cheaper but awful Y5V ceramics), since this capacitor is non-critical (functions as low impedance side for those original general purpose 85C capacitors). However, for the capacitor that is very close to the heatsink (which is actually part of the switched mode power supply feedback section) then stick to the capacitor I've specified (for stability reasons use either X8R, X7R or NP0/C0G ceramics). icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Dec 6 2013, 03:45 PM
BuFung
post Dec 6 2013, 05:40 PM

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Lex, u accept repair faulty speaker? Power Studio monitor speaker.
let me know detail.. thanks.
TSlex
post Dec 6 2013, 06:51 PM

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QUOTE(BuFung @ Dec 6 2013, 05:40 PM)
Lex,  u accept repair faulty speaker? Power Studio monitor speaker.
let me know detail.. thanks.
*
Yups, I do repair many types of speaker systems. What was the actual brand and model (as can't find any references to the brand "Power Studio")? Also what was the problem with them? Anyway, just PM me for more details... hmm.gif

BuFung
post Dec 6 2013, 09:21 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 6 2013, 06:51 PM)
Yups, I do repair many types of speaker systems. What was the actual brand and model (as can't find any references to the brand "Power Studio")? Also what was the problem with them? Anyway, just PM me for more details...  hmm.gif
*
Sorry .. I mean is a powered studio monitor.. brand is Tannoy ... model is eclipse 8..
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post Dec 6 2013, 10:24 PM

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QUOTE(BuFung @ Dec 6 2013, 09:21 PM)
Sorry .. I mean is a powered studio monitor..  brand is Tannoy ... model is eclipse 8..
*
After looking up this model, looks to be quite a complex speaker system (even has custom software to remote control it). Possibly has integrated MCU and DSP for its crossover and external output connections. By the way, what was wrong with it? Can describe the symptoms? hmm.gif

BuFung
post Dec 6 2013, 10:59 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 6 2013, 10:24 PM)
After looking up this model, looks to be quite a complex speaker system (even has custom software to remote control it). Possibly has integrated MCU and DSP for its crossover and external output connections. By the way, what was wrong with it? Can describe the symptoms? hmm.gif
*
Dont worry. My is older gen without Dsp. 1 time plug in power .. On.. white smoke come out... then cannot ON no more..
Kahlid74
post Dec 6 2013, 11:02 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 6 2013, 02:28 AM)
If you are talking about the cracked ceramic disc capcitor replacement then it would work. Like I've mentioned earlier just any 100nF or 0.1uF ceramic capacitor of 50V or higher rating can be used (even those cheaper but awful Y5V ceramics), since this capacitor is non-critical (functions as low impedance side for those original general purpose 85C capacitors). However, for the capacitor that is very close to the heatsink (which is actually part of the switched mode power supply feedback section) then stick to the capacitor I've specified (for stability reasons use either X8R, X7R or NP0/C0G ceramics). icon_rolleyes.gif
*
So I could just buy a couple of the ceramic capacitor your specified and use that for both right?

Also, Digikey is out of two of the capacitors:

So for the 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedence and/or low ESR type (for SMPS)
This:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...K4y6Z7OvlMKU%3d
or this:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...BwN1o%2f8xKs%3d

For the 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (inverter/balast)
Would these work?
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...ko7RlAfp%2fg%3d
or
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...CPZDTM13hVQI%3d


This post has been edited by Kahlid74: Dec 6 2013, 11:11 PM
TSlex
post Dec 7 2013, 12:50 AM

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QUOTE(BuFung @ Dec 6 2013, 10:59 PM)
Dont worry. My is older gen without Dsp. 1 time plug in power .. On.. white smoke come out...  then cannot ON no more..
*
Sounds much like the power supply section blew, possibly some weak, failed and/or faulty components. Usually should be fixable/repairable... hmm.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 6 2013, 11:02 PM)
So I could just buy a couple of the ceramic capacitor your specified and use that for both right?
Yups, can use the same capacitor (that more expensive X8R high temperature ceramic) for both. nod.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 6 2013, 11:02 PM)
Also, Digikey is out of two of the capacitors:

So for the 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedence and/or low ESR type (for SMPS)
This:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...K4y6Z7OvlMKU%3d
or this:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...BwN1o%2f8xKs%3d
Either ones should be fine, just different packaging from the details on the website. Another option would be Nichicon PW series (slightly higher specifications than Nichicon PS series). wink.gif

QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 6 2013, 11:02 PM)
For the 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (inverter/balast)
Would these work?
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...ko7RlAfp%2fg%3d
or
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Nichic...CPZDTM13hVQI%3d
*

Their specifications are much lower than the Nichicon CS series. Here are some similar capacitors (with way better specifications than the ones you've chosen): Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Leaded > Panasonic EEU-ED2W680 (used in the 2nd repair) and Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Leaded > Panasonic EEU-EE2W680 (used in the 3rd repair which was not shown here). Both of them are also high ripple current handling plus long life... icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Dec 7 2013, 12:54 AM
Kahlid74
post Dec 7 2013, 03:58 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 6 2013, 11:50 AM)
Sounds much like the power supply section blew, possibly some weak, failed and/or faulty components. Usually should be fixable/repairable... hmm.gif

Yups, can use the same capacitor (that more expensive X8R high temperature ceramic) for both. nod.gif

Either ones should be fine, just different packaging from the details on the website. Another option would be Nichicon PW series (slightly higher specifications than Nichicon PS series). wink.gif

Their specifications are much lower than the Nichicon CS series. Here are some similar capacitors (with way better specifications than the ones you've chosen): Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Leaded > Panasonic EEU-ED2W680 (used in the 2nd repair) and Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Leaded > Panasonic EEU-EE2W680 (used in the 3rd repair which was not shown here). Both of them are also high ripple current handling plus long life... icon_rolleyes.gif
*
All capacitors purchased, UPS ground, should get them middle of next week. Kind of excited to replace them and see where it then lies. Thank you so much for all your help on this.

So all the parts have now come in and I've begun cleaning glue areas. Two specific areas proved very difficult and unfortunately, the green came up with them. The glue was so hard/crusted that it took the green with it when it came off. Is the board still workable?

user posted image
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stargamer
post Dec 13 2013, 04:56 AM

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can u repair razer mako 2.1 speaker? its having clicking sound

http://www.fixya.com/support/t8840595-raze...ko_2_0_speakers

This post has been edited by stargamer: Dec 13 2013, 04:58 AM
TSlex
post Dec 13 2013, 05:02 AM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 13 2013, 03:11 AM)
So all the parts have now come in and I've begun cleaning glue areas.  Two specific areas proved very difficult and unfortunately, the green came up with them.  The glue was so hard/crusted that it took the green with it when it came off.  Is the board still workable?
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
That's typical as the chemical from the degraded glue has "eaten" into the solder resist layer (that green thingy). Usually its still workable, as long as you did not break any fine traces. Make sure those traces are still connected to each other, and check for possible shorts with surrounding copper areas (e.g. bits of copper layers pulled up and mangled). There are large areas of copper that is mostly either (hot) GND or +350VDC (or +154VDC for U.S version). Removing degraded glue from that resistor (encased in heat shrink tubing) should have been a piece of cake (and I did not have to remove that resistor) but not sure how you've gotten that "ugly" (lots of scrape marks can be seen). What tool did you use? hmm.gif

QUOTE(stargamer @ Dec 13 2013, 04:56 AM)
can u repair razer mako 2.1 speaker? its having clicking sound

http://www.fixya.com/support/t8840595-raze...ko_2_0_speakers
*
Yups, I can repair that Razer Mako speaker system. Have already fixed/repaired 3 units so far, and all have the same ticking sound syndrome (plus other problems). icon_rolleyes.gif
Kahlid74
post Dec 13 2013, 06:48 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 12 2013, 03:47 PM)
That's typical as the chemical from the degraded glue has "eaten" into the solder resist layer (that green thingy). Usually its still workable, as long as you did not break any fine traces. Make sure those traces are still connected to each other, and check for possible shorts with surrounding copper areas (e.g. bits of copper layers pulled up and mangled). There are large areas of copper that is mostly either (hot) GND or +350VDC (or +154VDC for U.S version). Removing degraded glue from that resistor (encased in heat shrink tubing) should have been a piece of cake (and I did not have to remove that resistor) but not sure how you've gotten that "ugly" (lots of scrape marks can be seen). What tool did you use? hmm.gif
*
I just used a small flat head screw driver and an Exacto knife. The exacto knife is probably what did it. I tried to be super careful but that glue, when it gets super hard like that, it won't budge.
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post Dec 13 2013, 04:27 PM

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QUOTE(Kahlid74 @ Dec 13 2013, 06:48 AM)
I just used a small flat head screw driver and an Exacto knife.  The exacto knife is probably what did it.  I tried to be super careful but that glue, when it gets super hard like that, it won't budge.
*
Must have patience, padawan. As mentioned some time ago (here: Post #11), degraded glue removal can be very tedious and have to proceed slowly (and carefully/meticulously) to avoid damaging/breaking PCB traces. When using a sharp knife, try avoid directly touching the PCB (otherwise there will be deep scrape and scratch marks, and possibly damaging/breaking fine PCB traces)... hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Dec 13 2013, 04:31 PM
Kahlid74
post Dec 13 2013, 09:55 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Dec 13 2013, 03:27 AM)
Must have patience, padawan. As mentioned some time ago (here: Post #11), degraded glue removal can be very tedious and have to proceed slowly (and carefully/meticulously) to avoid damaging/breaking PCB traces. When using a sharp knife, try avoid directly touching the PCB (otherwise there will be deep scrape and scratch marks, and possibly damaging/breaking fine PCB traces)... hmm.gif
*
Indeed. I thought I was being gently but perhaps not gentle enough.

So check this out. In the mean time, with these being kind of rare now, I purchased a "Working" Gigaworks sound system off Ebay. Upon arrival it has the exact same issue as my system which is crazy! The seller is insistent it was working when he sent it, which even if it wasn't he can throw UPS under the bus as he wants me to file a claim with them, which I did. The problem is I will not give up the boards to UPS to investigate. So we'll see where this goes.

Sooo crazy. Same exact issue, no power, no red light period. How bizarre.
chrislue
post Jan 13 2014, 05:15 PM

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hi, lex, what do you use to remove those degraded glue, they are very hard, thanks!
k3lvinNdad
post Jan 13 2014, 05:18 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Jan 13 2014, 05:15 PM)
hi, lex, what do you use to remove those degraded glue, they are very hard, thanks!
*
i think with small screw drive or penknife will do...but careful
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post Jan 13 2014, 10:14 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Jan 13 2014, 05:15 PM)
hi, lex, what do you use to remove those degraded glue, they are very hard, thanks!
*
Usually I would use a flat head screwdriver, and very rarely I would use anything sharp like a knife and/or blade. Often have to proceed slowly and carefully (bit by bit on difficult patches) thus must have patience also as you do not want to damage any fine PCB traces. icon_rolleyes.gif

chrislue
post Jan 17 2014, 02:40 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Jan 13 2014, 10:14 PM)
Usually I would use a flat head screwdriver, and very rarely I would use anything sharp like a knife and/or blade. Often have to proceed slowly and carefully (bit by bit on difficult patches) thus must have patience also as you do not want to damage any fine PCB traces. icon_rolleyes.gif
*
Thanks, that's what I think, really time consuming and need patience.

I have another question, are general purpose capacitors OK for the 2 capacitors of 100v 330uf? Since I can't find neither Rubycon ZLJ nor ZLH here. I have Rubycon YXA and NIPPON KMF series.
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post Jan 17 2014, 03:31 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Jan 17 2014, 02:40 PM)
Thanks, that's what I think, really time consuming and need patience.

I have another question, are general purpose capacitors OK for the 2 capacitors of 100v 330uf? Since I can't find neither Rubycon ZLJ nor ZLH here. I have Rubycon YXA and NIPPON KMF series.
*
This subwoofer power supply is switched mode type, thus the filter capacitors (at the secondary output section) should have been those low ESR or low impedance type, such as those I've chosen like Rubycon ZLJ and Rubycon ZLH series. That Rubycon YXA series is a standard (general purpose) capacitors with low ripple current handling. However Nippon Chemicon KMF series would be much better as its targeted as low impedance product, and had better/higher ripple current handling than Rubycon YXA series. Anyway, Rubycon YXA should have been already EOL'ed. Are those counterfeit capacitors? Diameter and lead pitch/spacing also goes into the capacitor selection. Does those capacitors have the correct diameter (12.5mm or less) and lead pitch/spacing (5mm)? hmm.gif

chrislue
post Jan 17 2014, 07:34 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Jan 17 2014, 03:31 PM)
This subwoofer power supply is switched mode type, thus the filter capacitors (at the secondary output section) should have been those low ESR or low impedance type, such as those I've chosen like Rubycon ZLJ and Rubycon ZLH series. That Rubycon YXA series is a standard (general purpose) capacitors with low ripple current handling. However Nippon Chemicon KMF series would be much better as its targeted as low impedance product, and had better/higher ripple current handling than Rubycon YXA series. Anyway, Rubycon YXA should have been already EOL'ed. Are those counterfeit capacitors? Diameter and lead pitch/spacing also goes into the capacitor selection. Does those capacitors have the correct diameter (12.5mm or less) and lead pitch/spacing (5mm)? hmm.gif
*
Nippon KMF are actually 16mm, guess would not fit perfectly. They should be authentic, but I'm not 100% sure. hmm.gif

Looks like I will buy from Digikey anyway.

Thanks for the info!
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post Jan 19 2014, 03:16 AM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Jan 17 2014, 07:34 PM)
Nippon KMF are actually 16mm, guess would not fit perfectly. They should be authentic, but I'm not 100% sure. hmm.gif

Looks like I will buy from Digikey anyway.

Thanks for the info!
*
With Digikey, besides Rubycon ZLH and Rubycon ZLJ, there are choices there (with 12.5mm diameter and 5mm lead pitch/spacing) such as Nichicon HE, Nippon Chemi-con KZE, Rubycon ZL and Rubycon YXG. icon_rolleyes.gif
kukruse
post Jan 23 2014, 04:09 PM

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Hi, lex.
First af all, I am very thankful to you for this thread.
I have also a problem with my S750 set.
One day my S750 did not give the power at all. The main fuse was blown out. But I found also that on both amp.boards C40 were burned out totally - see picture.
Other components seems OK.
Attached Image
So because it was not clear why it happened, I decided to replace all components what were available at the Digi-Key.
Thus most of passive components were replaced - my BOM file is uploaded too. I did not test transistors/power ICs, but visually they were good.
At the final phase when I must to test my S750 I found that I lost my marks about how to connect amp. boards to the IO-board (the board with inputs/outputs) and to the power board.
Attached Image
Maybe somebody here can give me information about that.
Attached File  partlist.doc ( 79.5k ) Number of downloads: 537


This post has been edited by kukruse: Jan 23 2014, 04:14 PM
TSlex
post Jan 23 2014, 09:46 PM

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QUOTE(kukruse @ Jan 23 2014, 04:09 PM)
First af all, I am very thankful to you for this thread.
I have also a problem with my S750 set.
One day my S750 did not give the power at all. The main fuse was blown out. But I found also that on both amp.boards C40 were burned out totally - see picture.
Other components seems OK.
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Have to check the 4th unit first (was sent all the way from another country) for that C40 capacitor value. If that fuse blew then there must have been quite a short somewhere. Also those burned capacitors may indicate excessive ripples and voltage surges on the power rails... hmm.gif

QUOTE(kukruse @ Jan 23 2014, 04:09 PM)
So because it was not clear why it happened, I decided to replace all components what were available at the Digi-Key.
Thus most of passive components were replaced - my BOM file is uploaded too. I did not test transistors/power ICs, but visually they were good.
At the final phase when I must to test my S750 I found that I lost my marks about how to connect amp. boards to the IO-board (the board with inputs/outputs) and to the power board.
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Maybe somebody here can give me information about that.
Attached File  partlist.doc ( 79.5k ) Number of downloads: 537
*
Better check the MOSFETs, due to that blown fuse. Sometimes failed MOSFETs show no signs but can be shorted internally (usually between the gate and the source, and/or between drain and source). Also check all fusible links (those zero Ohm thingies). As for that list, all looks good though that Nichicon CY is a little skinnier/smaller than the Nichicon CS I've chosen. Just make sure all have correct diameter, lead spacing and proper height (not too tall until touching the toasty heatsink, which will shorten the lifespan of the capacitors). icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jan 23 2014, 09:48 PM
chrislue
post Feb 2 2014, 09:48 PM

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Hi, lex,

I had someone tried to repair s750 which has small distorted sound for me but not succeed,, I can see one resis blown (R30, R39? can't remember). The guy said once he replaced the blown one, it's good, but after he turned volume up it blown again. What could be the problem? And when I got the power board back, it's missing some components, I guess the guy didn't put them back. Could you tell me the info about R30, R39, R31, D24, R23, R42? Digikey links would be perfect, appreciated.

Chris
kukruse
post Feb 3 2014, 09:26 PM

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lex, thanks for your reply.
I have checked 4x big MOSFET on power board and it seems that they are OK - at least there is resistance between all the pins.
All components what are in the list are already placed on the boards.
Right now I don't know how to connect boards to each other.
Could you give me some advice about that?

This post has been edited by kukruse: Feb 3 2014, 09:27 PM
TSlex
post Feb 5 2014, 04:12 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 2 2014, 09:48 PM)
I had someone tried to repair s750 which has small distorted sound  for me but not succeed,, I can see one resis blown (R30, R39? can't remember). The guy said once he replaced the blown one, it's good, but after he turned volume up it blown again. What could be the problem? And when I got the power board back, it's missing some components, I guess the guy didn't put them back. Could you tell me the info about R30, R39, R31, D24, R23, R42? Digikey links would be perfect, appreciated.
*
For those components on the power board, then check Post #37...
QUOTE(lex @ Sep 15 2013, 01:25 AM)


QUOTE(kukruse @ Feb 3 2014, 09:26 PM)
lex, thanks for your reply.
I have checked 4x big MOSFET on power board and it seems that they are OK - at least there is resistance between all the pins.
All components what are in the list are already placed on the boards.
Right now I don't know how to connect boards to each other.
Could you give me some advice about that?
*
There could be components with voltage break down (which usually would require an insulation/breakdown tester), especially those non-electrolytic capacitors and MOSFETs (leaky transistor). Can use the series light bulb method to check for shorts and/or breakdown (if insulation tester not available at the moment). As for the amplifier boards, there should be another regulator there (usually a Buck switching type) for the BASH power amplifier I.Cs thus do check them (for shorts and other failed components)... hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Feb 5 2014, 04:13 PM
chrislue
post Feb 14 2014, 07:16 PM

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Hi lex,

I see in your second repair, the solder pads were damaged, how did you solve this? I got this problem too, they came off very easily. I am trying to repair my another s750 which has a problem have to switch on twice with controller. BTW, do you have any idea what cause this problem?

I just changed 4 big 470uf cap, one of the solder pad is damaged. Now when I switch on the speaker with controller, there is a "don" sound, it's not very lound but not small either, didn't have that before, so I turned it off right way in case cost more damage.

Edited,

I just found information from previous posts, so basically these components like caps are connected on top layer, not the back layer where leads are, right? So I need to connect the leads to the top layer to fix the damaged solder pads problem.

And can I just mount them on the back, so the leads are soldered on the top layer, maybe not the big caps but other small components?

This post has been edited by chrislue: Feb 14 2014, 08:41 PM
watermineral
post Feb 14 2014, 08:44 PM

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i am envy you guys know how to fix this electronic stuff, my speaker broken i don know what to do with it, constant noise aww
TSlex
post Feb 15 2014, 02:30 AM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 14 2014, 07:16 PM)
I see in your second repair, the solder pads were damaged, how did you solve this? I got this problem too, they came off very easily. I am trying to repair my another s750 which has a problem have to switch on twice with controller. BTW, do you have any idea what cause this problem?
Try replacing the DIACs near the main power section (where the bigger SMPS transformer is located)... hmm.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 14 2014, 07:16 PM)
I just changed 4 big 470uf cap, one of the solder pad is damaged. Now when I switch on the speaker with controller, there is a "don" sound, it's not very lound but not small either, didn't have that before, so I turned it off right way in case cost more damage.

Edited,

I just found information from previous posts, so basically these components like caps are connected on top layer, not the back layer where leads are, right? So I need to connect the leads to the top layer to fix the damaged solder pads problem.

And can I just mount them on the back, so the leads are soldered on the top layer, maybe not the big caps but other small components?
*
As for fixing that solder pad through hole problem, check my previous/earlier reply here: Special Interest -> Home Entertainment -> Audiophiles ->Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio) -> Post #21. Looking at the comments, you also need to learn some basic of electronic repairs particularly understanding the circuitary (in other words able to read where and how the components are connected, as well as tracing out the paths). One side/lead/leg of the capacitor is connected to the top side layer via that through hole. For double sided boards, usually each through hole has a connection to both top and bottom sides of the circuit board (there's a tinned copper tube inside the hole). wink.gif

QUOTE(watermineral @ Feb 14 2014, 08:44 PM)
i am envy you guys know how to fix this electronic stuff, my speaker broken i don know what to do with it, constant noise aww
*
What is the speaker brand and model? unsure.gif

chrislue
post Feb 15 2014, 03:09 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 15 2014, 02:30 AM)
One side/lead/leg of the capacitor is connected to the top side layer via that through hole. For double sided boards, usually each through hole has a connection to both top and bottom sides of the circuit board (there's a tinned copper tube inside the hole).  wink.gif
Each lead of component like a capacitor is actually connected into circuitry on only one side of the board, am I understanding correct?


Anyway, every time when I switch on the speakers with controller, there is a pop sound, didn't have that before, is this due to capacitors failure to connect? I only changed the 4 big 470uf capacitors.

Thank you.
TSlex
post Feb 15 2014, 03:12 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 15 2014, 03:09 AM)
Each lead of component like a capacitor is actually connected into circuitry on only one side of the board, am I understanding correct?
*
Not every capacitor lead/leg is connected like that. Cannot simply assume, always check the connections of component first (as you do not want create unwanted shorts and wrong connections). Again, re-quote from my earlier post here: Special Interest -> Home Entertainment -> Audiophiles ->Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio) -> Post #90... doh.gif
QUOTE(lex @ Feb 15 2014, 02:30 AM)
Looking at the comments, you also need to learn some basic of electronic repairs particularly understanding the circuitary (in other words able to read where and how the components are connected, as well as tracing out the paths).
*
That's right, read, trace and understand the connections.... wink.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 15 2014, 03:09 AM)
Anyway, every time when I switch on the speakers with controller, there is a pop sound, didn't have that before, is this due to capacitors failure to connect? I only changed the 4 big 470uf capacitors.
*
Have you removed all the degraded glue in the first place? Did you properly check the connections properly repaired on those damages through holes (requires a multimeter)? Also try replacing all the capacitors, not just those 4 big ones only.... hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Feb 15 2014, 03:12 PM
watermineral
post Feb 16 2014, 06:08 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 15 2014, 02:30 AM)
Try replacing the DIACs near the main power section (where the bigger SMPS transformer is located)... hmm.gif

As for fixing that solder pad through hole problem, check my previous/earlier reply here: Special Interest -> Home Entertainment -> Audiophiles ->Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio) -> Post #21. Looking at the comments, you also need to learn some basic of electronic repairs particularly understanding the circuitary (in other words able to read where and how the components are connected, as well as tracing out the paths). One side/lead/leg of the capacitor is connected to the top side layer via that through hole. For double sided boards, usually each through hole has a connection to both top and bottom sides of the circuit board (there's a tinned copper tube inside the hole).  wink.gif

What is the speaker brand and model? unsure.gif
*
edifier s330, same problem also, constant noise, but the sound more like duuuuuuu.... rclxub.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2yBSXv0gc0...player_embedded

This post has been edited by watermineral: Feb 16 2014, 06:10 AM
chrislue
post Feb 16 2014, 11:14 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 15 2014, 03:12 PM)
Not every capacitor lead/leg is connected like that. Cannot simply assume, always check the connections of component first (as you do not want create unwanted shorts and wrong connections). Again, re-quote from my earlier post here: Special Interest -> Home Entertainment -> Audiophiles ->Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker repair, A short guide and info with pictures... (PC Audio) -> Post #90... doh.gif That's right, read, trace and understand the connections.... wink.gif

Have you removed all the degraded glue in the first place? Did you properly check the connections properly repaired on  those damages through holes (requires a multimeter)? Also try replacing all the capacitors, not just those 4 big ones only....  hmm.gif
*
I just checked the stock caps I pulled out, found out that almost every copper tubes inside through holes have also been pulled out with caps leads. blink.gif

Looks like I have to use the "L" way to fix them all.

Is there any good way to avoid this? I tried use solder sucker, didn't work very well, so basically I just melt the solder and then pull out caps by force. icon_question.gif
TSlex
post Feb 16 2014, 01:43 PM

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QUOTE(watermineral @ Feb 16 2014, 06:08 AM)
edifier s330, same problem also, constant noise, but the sound more like duuuuuuu....  rclxub.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2yBSXv0gc0...player_embedded
*
Could be either the power supply section and/or audio power amplifier section. Hard to say until examined closely the internals... hmm.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 16 2014, 11:14 AM)
I just checked the stock caps I pulled out, found out that almost every copper tubes inside through holes have also been pulled out with caps leads. blink.gif

Looks like I have to use the "L" way to fix them all.
Can ignore the leads that are connected to the bottom side, just repair the leads that are connected to the top side. Check carefully the location to place the "L" wire on the top as to prevent unwanted connections. wink.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 16 2014, 11:14 AM)
Is there any good way to avoid this? I tried use solder sucker, didn't work very well, so basically I just melt the solder and then pull out caps by force.  icon_question.gif
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If use that method, then pull them by tilting the capacitor side to side with one lead/leg at a time. The problem is that there is solder between the leads/legs of the capacitor and the tube surface inside that still remained. Usually can be pulled out easily but if the leads/legs are tight inside the hole then the soldering iron had to stay a little longer (to completely melt the solder inside the hole), and that usually can result in the tubes and solder pads coming off due to prolonged heating (as the soldering iron melts the glue than holds them in place). And yeah, desoldering double sided board can sometimes be very difficult as well, especially when there is solder still inside the through hole. The most recommended tool for this type of job is: HAKKO | Desoldering / Rework | HAKKO 808 which is rather pricey but gets the job done. Example of real word usage... icon_rolleyes.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


This post has been edited by lex: Feb 16 2014, 01:44 PM
chrislue
post Feb 16 2014, 06:24 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 16 2014, 01:43 PM)
Could be either the power supply section and/or audio power amplifier section. Hard to say until examined closely the internals... hmm.gif

Can ignore the leads that are connected to the bottom side, just repair the leads that are connected to the top side. Check carefully the location to place the "L" wire on the top as to prevent unwanted connections. wink.gif

If use that method, then pull them by tilting the capacitor side to side with one lead/leg at a time. The problem is that there is solder between the leads/legs of the capacitor and the tube surface inside that still remained. Usually can be pulled out easily but if the leads/legs are tight inside the hole then the soldering iron had to stay a little longer (to completely melt the solder inside the hole), and that usually can result in the tubes and solder pads coming off due to prolonged heating (as the soldering iron melts the glue than holds them in place). And yeah, desoldering double sided board can sometimes be very difficult as well, especially when there is solder still inside the through hole. The most recommended tool for this type of job is: HAKKO | Desoldering / Rework | HAKKO 808 which is rather pricey but gets the job done. Example of real word usage... icon_rolleyes.gif 
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «

*
Thank you for the info, and good news, I have successfully repaired one of my s750 sets! biggrin.gif And I know how to read the connections on PCB now! It had distorted sounds before, I carefully replaced some parts, including blown diodes, one zener, some capsm and one IRF740 connected to blown diodes. Soldering on such PCB especially dealing with damaged pads is a frustrating thing, using L connections through holes, scratching solder mask then create connections, have to be very careful. Anyway, without your help, it couldn't be done, cheers! thumbup.gif

I'm going to fix my another set with double switch on problem!
edit:
Got my meter today, looks like D9 is a bad one, no visual damage, gonna replace it. BTW, I also checked the topic on creative forum, they are pretty accurate about damaged parts.
edit2:
Replaced D9 and re-soldered those 470uf caps, everything is OK now. Once I thought I need find new replacement for my speakers, but now I have 2 sets of working S750!

I still have another question, since I haven't replaced other small caps yet. For those you mentioned choosing low impedance and/or low ESR types, how much difference is between a high one and a low one? Like for 100uf 35v, between an United Chemi-Con GXE series 340mA 320mOhm and a Nichicon PW series 555mA 117 mOhm? Do they make a big difference? What's the max acceptable impedance or min ripple current?

Thank you.

This post has been edited by chrislue: Feb 17 2014, 10:54 AM
chrislue
post Feb 21 2014, 11:48 AM

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Bad news, one of my S750 blew again, first time after I repaired it it's OK, played some music for several minutes, second time blew when doing some volume adjustments in windows . I checked it, same parts blew, a R30 resistor blew, turn to black, along with a diode d24 (a 15v zener replaced last repair), no visual damage, other parts seem ok.

What could caused this?
TSlex
post Feb 22 2014, 07:02 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 16 2014, 06:24 PM)
I still have another question, since I haven't replaced other small caps yet. For those you mentioned choosing low impedance and/or low ESR types, how much difference is between a high one and a low one? Like for 100uf 35v, between an United Chemi-Con GXE series  340mA 320mOhm and a Nichicon PW series 555mA 117 mOhm? Do they make a big difference? What's the max acceptable impedance or min ripple current?
*
For those capacitors after the voltage regulators, any low impedance capacitors will do. The main purpose is to filter out remaining ripples from the voltage regulator and rectifier stage (which could have slipped the first hurdle). Those Nippon Chemi-con GXE series have higher operating temperatures (up to 125C) targeted for harsh and very hot environments such as inside car engines (and should be also suitable for this speaker system). Generally prefer capacitors that can handle high ripple currents and also low impedance as well. wink.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 21 2014, 11:48 AM)
Bad news, one of my S750 blew again, first time after I repaired it it's OK, played some music for several minutes, second time blew when doing some volume adjustments in windows . I checked it, same parts blew, a R30 resistor blew, turn to black, along with a diode d24 (a 15v zener replaced last repair), no visual damage, other parts seem ok.

What could caused this?
*
Is that R30 resistor have a value of 100 Ohms? What was the wattage of the resistor and zener diodes? Do note that both resistors and zener diodes have wattage ratings. If too small wattage then it may blow (due to overheating and conducting electrical current past specifications). Check the pins at the transformer for cold solder joints. There may be a weak MOSFET in the other side/half of the circuit (which could be damaged in the first failure). Thus replace those with new ones as well. Also check that fusible link (0 Ohm resistor). Anyway, did you remove all the degraded glue and replace all the capacitors as mentioned here? hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Feb 22 2014, 07:03 PM
chrislue
post Feb 23 2014, 02:02 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 22 2014, 07:02 PM)
Is that R30 resistor have a value of 100 Ohms? What was the wattage of the resistor and zener diodes? Do note that both resistors and zener diodes have wattage ratings. If too small wattage then it may blow (due to overheating and conducting electrical current past specifications). Check the pins at the transformer for cold solder joints. There may be a weak MOSFET in the other side/half of the circuit (which could be damaged in the first failure). Thus replace those with new ones as well. Also check that fusible link (0 Ohm resistor). Anyway, did you remove all the degraded glue and replace all the capacitors as mentioned here? hmm.gif
*
Yes, R30 is a 100Ohms 1/4 W resistor, and the zener is 15v 500mW (1/2 W), should I replace R30 with a 1/2 W? I forgot to mention I also changed a mosfet IRF740 Q4 which is connected with R30 in first repair, I don't know if it is failed this time since I don't know how to check a mosfet. R3 and R32 (0 Ohm resistors) are OK.
I have removed all the glue and replaced all the capacitors, same ones you used in your repair.

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post Feb 24 2014, 01:16 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 23 2014, 02:02 AM)
Yes, R30 is a 100Ohms 1/4 W resistor, and the zener is 15v 500mW (1/2 W), should I replace R30 with a 1/2 W? I forgot to mention I also changed a mosfet IRF740 Q4 which is connected with R30 in first repair, I don't know if it is failed this time since I don't know how to check a mosfet. R3 and R32 (0 Ohm resistors) are OK.
Try using higher wattage parts, plus check D16, R39, C30 and C58 (replace all of them if necessary). Also on the other half, replace Q1. As for the R31 (fusible link or zero Ohm resistor), make sure it has no resistance at all (virtually zero Ohms). Do inspect carefully for possible cold/cracked solder joints on the transformer pins. Re-check the L links on the through hole repairs (make sure the top side has sufficient solder and contact with it)... hmm.gif

QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 23 2014, 02:02 AM)
I have removed all the glue and replaced all the capacitors, same ones you used in your repair.
*
Make sure all degraded glue has been cleanly removed especially the feedback areas, and places there there are exposed traces and solder pads. Clean with isopropyl alcohol also, as sometimes the chemicals from the degraded glue breaking down may remain on the surface (will look like stains, and is usually conductive and/or corrosive!). icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Feb 24 2014, 01:20 PM
chrislue
post Feb 25 2014, 05:32 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Feb 24 2014, 01:16 PM)
Try using higher wattage parts, plus check D16, R39, C30 and C58 (replace all of them if necessary). Also on the other half, replace Q1. As for the R31 (fusible link or zero Ohm resistor), make sure it has no resistance at all (virtually zero Ohms). Do inspect carefully for possible cold/cracked solder joints on the transformer pins. Re-check the L links on the through hole repairs (make sure the top side has sufficient solder and contact with it)... hmm.gif

Make sure all degraded glue has been cleanly removed especially the feedback areas, and places there there are exposed traces and solder pads. Clean with isopropyl alcohol also, as sometimes the chemicals from the degraded glue breaking down may remain on the surface (will look like stains, and is usually conductive and/or corrosive!). icon_rolleyes.gif
*
From the schematic, I can tell C30 is 220pf 1kv, D16 is 1n4148, but what about C58? 3300pf? what is the voltage?

andrew9292
post Feb 25 2014, 01:03 PM

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I noticed that some film caps have a VDC or VAC or just V rating for voltage.
Do this ratings play a role for coupling capacitors? (2.2 uf 50V caps on Edifier M3300 changing to film caps)
jviojtaba
post Feb 26 2014, 05:30 AM

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hi , at first my s750 just wont turn on and i fix them after that i got 2 cap exploded !
i change them and right now its working as power supply !
but all of my speakers have a low sound and distorted sound i don't know where is the problem exactly,
so i just ask for it if anyone have this problem and know which part of amp make this problem
just tell me and i will find a way to fix it tnx , i keep looking forward to found a way to fix the problem .
if any photo needed i can bring the photos just ask me . sad.gif
TSlex
post Mar 3 2014, 09:41 PM

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QUOTE(chrislue @ Feb 25 2014, 05:32 AM)
From the schematic, I can tell C30 is 220pf 1kv, D16 is 1n4148, but what about C58? 3300pf? what is the voltage?
*
For most of these switching type power supply circuits, especially close to any choke or transformer (such as those used as part of snubber network), the voltage rating of the capacitor should be around at least 1kV (usually to account for any forward and/or back EMF which has usually higher voltage than the supply rail). For that C58, just try using one 3.3nF capacitor with 1kVDC rating (although it looks to be main part of an oscillator startup/feedback loop)... hmm.gif

QUOTE(andrew9292 @ Feb 25 2014, 01:03 PM)
I noticed that some film caps have a VDC or VAC or just V rating for voltage.
Do this ratings play a role for coupling capacitors? (2.2 uf 50V caps on Edifier M3300 changing to film caps)
*
Hardly matters here anyway as even the audio signal is very low (typically under 2VRMS) and well below 50V peak level (of course not surpassing the voltage of the power supply). The bias voltage held at these capacitors is about half the voltage of the supply rails which is pretty low (again, much lower than 50V)... wink.gif

QUOTE(jviojtaba @ Feb 26 2014, 05:30 AM)
hi , at first my s750 just wont turn on and i fix them after that i got 2 cap exploded !
i change them and right now its working as power supply !
but all of my speakers have a low sound and distorted sound i don't know where is the problem exactly,
so i just ask for it if anyone have this problem and know which part of amp make this problem
just tell me and i will find a way to fix it tnx , i keep looking forward to found a way to fix the problem .
if any photo needed i can bring the photos just ask me .  sad.gif
*
First, check what was the voltage output at the main power section (for the power amplifier section). Did you change all the capacitors as shown here? Also check for faulty components, especially that fusible link (zero Ohm resistor) at the main power section... icon_rolleyes.gif

andrew9292
post Mar 7 2014, 09:53 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Mar 3 2014, 09:41 PM)
Hardly matters here anyway as even the audio signal is very low (typically under 2VRMS) and well below 50V peak level (of course not surpassing the voltage of the power supply). The bias voltage held at these capacitors is about half the voltage of the supply rails which is pretty low (again, much lower than 50V)... wink.gif
*
Got it! icon_rolleyes.gif
Audison
post Mar 19 2014, 02:58 AM

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Hi Lex and others posting in this thread! I just wanted to say Thank you! to all of you for making information about this sound system available as it helped tremendously when fixing my set of S750. I would probably never dared to open it, if it was not for this thread that give me all information i needed about the components and other stuff. I am not an expert in this field so apologies if i am going to be asking very basic stuff that anyone should know. I already replaced all the capacitors that was recommended in this thread but i need to replace one resistor that has died but i can't really read the colors down and all the measuring does give me not really clear idea of what resistance he is. i am going to attach an image or the picture that was posted above with my resistor marked. Thanks again for all your help. notworthy.gif

Attached Image
chiewming
post Apr 13 2014, 04:40 PM

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Impressive informative guide and log!!!

Mikoman
post May 8 2014, 09:00 PM

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Hi Lex, all,

Thanks for amazing tutorial. I fixed my s750. This is awesome.

I have replaced all capacitors with panasonic ones. I wonder if there is something wrong or it's normal behavior but the "L" type cooler on the power board (the one near big capacitors) is extremely hot even when i listen the music on low volume. So i added another massive cooler (marked with red arrow) to it and seems a lot better now but still hot. I quess that's why they used 105 degrees capacitors smile.gif

user posted image

I had the same issue like Galeak with immediate power of after a power on so i ordered those DB3 for replacement. So hopefully it will help.


Anyways after the replacement of all capacitors the green light was ok but the red light on the remote was death. I searched a little bit and found this


THE PROBLEM WITH THE ?CONTROL POD IF NO WORK, ONLY OPEN USING SCREWDRIVERS
LOOK ONE MICROCHIP ?M34502E4FP?, MAIBE CPU IT IS IN RESET STATE. THE ONLY THING YOU HAVE TO DO IS GET A SOURCE WITH 5 VOLTS DC AND PUT THE NEGATIVE LINE IN THE PIN 2 COUNTING SINCE MARK AS NUMBER AND THE POSITIVE LINE (+) ?IN THE PIN 6 IT IS THE RESET, IF NO ON RED LIGHTS IN THE CONTROL POD PUT THE POSITIVE LINE IN THE 7 PIN THIS PIN IS P2Ain THATS SUPPLY 5V DC TO DE STAND BY BUTTON MANUALLY AND RESET DE POD.
NOW RETIRE THE SOURCE OF 5V OF THE PINS AND THE POD IS WORKING NORMALLY. BE CAREFULL PUTING LINES (+) AND (-) ON THE PINS OF THE MICRO THAT NO JUMP WITH ANOTHER PINS.
HOPE THAT SOLVE THE PROBLEMS.

And this solved my problem (i did both steps with pin 6 and 7). Hope it will help to someone as well.

Cheers
Mikoman
post May 8 2014, 09:21 PM

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QUOTE(Audison @ Mar 18 2014, 08:58 PM)
Hi Lex and others posting in this thread! I just wanted to say Thank you! to all of you for making information about this sound system available as it helped tremendously when fixing my set of S750. I would probably never dared to open it, if it was not for this thread that give me all information i needed about the components and other stuff. I am not an expert in this field so apologies if i am going to be asking very basic stuff that anyone should know. I already replaced all the capacitors that was recommended in this thread but i need to replace one resistor that has died but i can't really read the colors down and all the measuring does give me not really clear idea of what resistance he is. i am going to attach an image or the picture that was posted above with my resistor marked. Thanks again for all your help. notworthy.gif

Attached Image
*
Hi,

its a 22 Ohms 1% for sure and 2W if i am right.

TSlex
post Jun 15 2014, 02:38 PM

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QUOTE(Audison @ Mar 19 2014, 02:58 AM)
Hi Lex and others posting in this thread! I just wanted to say Thank you! to all of you for making information about this sound system available as it helped tremendously when fixing my set of S750. I would probably never dared to open it, if it was not for this thread that give me all information i needed about the components and other stuff. I am not an expert in this field so apologies if i am going to be asking very basic stuff that anyone should know. I already replaced all the capacitors that was recommended in this thread but i need to replace one resistor that has died but i can't really read the colors down and all the measuring does give me not really clear idea of what resistance he is. i am going to attach an image or the picture that was posted above with my resistor marked. Thanks again for all your help. notworthy.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
Its 22 Ohms. That resistor is part of a RC snubber network around the recitfiers. I would recommend Google "resistor color code" to find references to resistor values, as well as online resistor color code calculators. nod.gif

QUOTE(Mikoman @ May 8 2014, 09:00 PM)
Hi Lex, all,

Thanks for amazing tutorial. I fixed my s750. This is awesome.

I have replaced all capacitors with panasonic ones. I wonder if there is something wrong or it's normal behavior but the "L" type cooler on the power board (the one near big capacitors) is extremely hot even when i listen the music on low volume. So i added another massive cooler (marked with red arrow) to it and seems a lot better now but still hot. I quess that's why they used 105 degrees capacitors smile.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Well, a fan mod would do better to cool down the components though would be more work than just attaching an extra heatsink. I've had another one repaired not long ago. Not as pretty as the first few shown here (due to very stubborn degraded glue).. cool2.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «

QUOTE(Mikoman @ May 8 2014, 09:00 PM)
I had the same issue like Galeak with immediate power of after a power on so i ordered those DB3 for replacement. So hopefully it will help.
Anyways after the replacement of all capacitors the green light was ok but the red light on the remote was death. I searched a little bit and found this
THE PROBLEM WITH THE ?CONTROL POD IF NO WORK, ONLY OPEN USING SCREWDRIVERS
LOOK ONE MICROCHIP ?M34502E4FP?, MAIBE CPU IT IS IN RESET STATE. THE ONLY THING YOU HAVE TO DO IS GET A SOURCE WITH 5 VOLTS DC AND PUT THE NEGATIVE LINE IN THE PIN 2 COUNTING SINCE MARK AS NUMBER AND THE POSITIVE LINE (+) ?IN THE PIN 6 IT IS THE RESET, IF NO ON RED LIGHTS IN THE CONTROL POD PUT THE POSITIVE LINE IN THE 7 PIN THIS PIN IS P2Ain THATS SUPPLY 5V DC TO DE STAND BY BUTTON MANUALLY AND RESET DE POD.
NOW RETIRE THE SOURCE OF 5V OF THE PINS AND THE POD IS WORKING NORMALLY. BE CAREFULL PUTING LINES (+) AND (-) ON THE PINS OF THE MICRO THAT NO JUMP WITH ANOTHER PINS.
HOPE THAT SOLVE THE PROBLEMS.

And this solved my problem (i did both steps with pin 6 and 7). Hope it will help to someone as well.

Cheers
*
Have not yet encountered such problematic control pods, though the usual problems I've encountered is the glitchy standby button (which causes quick on-then-off sometimes) due to worn microswitch inside. The other one, was the stuck volume button caused by misaligned plastic contact internally (can be fixed easily). As for the problem described above, thanks, will look into it when/if I've encountered one of these... hmm.gif
spenceg
post Jun 20 2014, 03:08 AM

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You are clearly a legend and have a lot of knowledge. I also have issues, but would like to hear you live in the UK, so I can pay you to fix my unit!

Here is hoping?!
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post Jun 20 2014, 08:11 PM

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QUOTE(spenceg @ Jun 20 2014, 03:08 AM)
You are clearly a legend and have a lot of knowledge.  I also have issues, but would like to hear you live in the UK, so I can pay you to fix my unit!

Here is hoping?!
*
Unfortunately I'm not living in the U.K. You may try finding someone with electronics repair experience (ie. good with soldering jobs) to help you from your own country at Badcaps... hmm.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jun 20 2014, 08:12 PM
spenceg
post Jun 22 2014, 11:13 PM

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shame shame!

It can handle the soldering, but I feel out of my depth working out what is wrong i.e. on a visual inspection all looks good (although maybe one questionable diode).

So what happened? Firstly I had that blinking green light issue, where there are enough internet posts saying use a hairdryer to heat it up (which is what I did). Afterwards when turned on the small box power (after a steady green light of 24 hrs or so), there was a pop and now the sound is all distorted/crackly. I am not sure how to diagnose or on what board the problem would be.

If you have ideas, I can test and also post photos, but where to start.

thanks in advance.


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post Jun 23 2014, 02:01 AM

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QUOTE(spenceg @ Jun 22 2014, 11:13 PM)
It can handle the soldering, but I feel out of my depth working out what is wrong i.e. on a visual inspection all looks good (although maybe one questionable diode).
As mentioned in this thread, first steps would be to replace those capacitors and clean up all the degraded glue (including those on the other boards besides the power supply one). Sometimes bad capacitors do not necessarily bulge/bloat. They can be also be leaking from the bottom, and/or simply became "dried" without any apparent signs. As for other failed and/or faulty components, then you have to look/observe carefully and may require some tools (such as a multimeter, plus some knowledge on diagnosing/checking for failed/faulty components). For some components, you may need to pull it out to check (ie. cannot be checked in circuit itself).. hmm.gif

QUOTE(spenceg @ Jun 22 2014, 11:13 PM)
So what happened?  Firstly I had that blinking green light issue, where there are enough internet posts saying use a hairdryer to heat it up (which is what I did).  Afterwards when turned on the small box power (after a steady green light of 24 hrs or so), there was a pop and now the sound is all distorted/crackly.  I am not sure how to diagnose or on what board the problem would be.
That hot air treatment is not recommended at all, and will eventually kill the subwoofer (which is what happened to the original person who posted that "quick fix", his subwoofer finally went kaput). That only works if there are dying/failing capacitors on the power supply. For your information, when capacitors start failing their capacitance is becoming reduced. Heating up electrolytic capacitors will increase its capacitance, thus "restores" some capacitance to allow the power circuits to continue to function. However in the long run, heating up those capacitors will cause the electrolytes inside to boil and degrade, thus finally goes bad and the subwoofer stops working altogether. Also heating up the boards inside the subwoofer dries up and evaporates the conductive chemicals from the degraded glue. This restores normal circuit functions. However as the degraded glue continue to decay and breakdown, more conductive chemicals are produced and causes circuit confusion (due to creation of "phantom circuits"). Using that hot air heating it up only temporarily restores some circuit functions (until the next round). Please note that direct heating can also damage (and degrade) other components as well... wink.gif

QUOTE(spenceg @ Jun 22 2014, 11:13 PM)
If you have ideas, I can test and also post photos, but where to start.

thanks in advance.
*
Some photos may help. What is your level of electronics knowledge? In particular, checking for failed/faulty components? unsure.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jun 23 2014, 02:10 AM
hiwnik
post Jun 24 2014, 07:40 PM

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Hello! I from Ukraine, sorry for my English. I have broken Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker system. I need your help. I followed for your advise and ordered complete set of capacitors but I found some diodes broken. Can You prompt me technical descriptions and analogues to these diodes: D6, D7, D8, D22, D23, D24 и D25. In the schematic (circuit) diagram for power board I found only D8 - 1n4148, and on other the detailed information is not present. Similarly discovered that at a few resistors resistance below set approximately on 40%: R19, R21, R22, R10, R33, R31. I found out the set resistance, but I would like to know, on what yet to pay attention at their replacement (firm-producer, tension).
Thank you for your useful advices. I wait an answer. smile.gif
Quazacolt
post Jun 25 2014, 01:21 AM

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QUOTE(hiwnik @ Jun 24 2014, 07:40 PM)
Hello! I from Ukraine, sorry for my English. I have broken Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker system. I need your help. I followed for your advise and ordered complete set of capacitors but I found some diodes broken. Can You prompt me technical descriptions and analogues to these diodes: D6, D7, D8, D22, D23, D24 и D25. In the schematic (circuit) diagram for power board I found only D8 - 1n4148, and on other the detailed information is not present. Similarly discovered that at a few resistors resistance below set approximately on 40%: R19, R21, R22, R10, R33, R31. I found out the set resistance, but I would like to know, on what yet to pay attention at their replacement (firm-producer, tension).
Thank you for your useful advices. I wait an answer. smile.gif
*
woah didn't expect someone from Ukraine to register just for this speaker. sifu lex need to entertain already laugh.gif
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post Jun 25 2014, 02:37 PM

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QUOTE(hiwnik @ Jun 24 2014, 07:40 PM)
Hello! I from Ukraine, sorry for my English. I have broken Creative GigaWorks S750 7.1 speaker system. I need your help. I followed for your advise and ordered complete set of capacitors but I found some diodes broken. Can You prompt me technical descriptions and analogues to these diodes: D6, D7, D8, D22, D23, D24 и D25. In the schematic (circuit) diagram for power board I found only D8 - 1n4148, and on other the detailed information is not present.
Both D6 and D7 are DIACS. The part number is "BR100/03" and you should be able to find it on most online stores. D22, D23, D24 and D25 are actually a 15V zener diode. Can just choose any available 15V zener diode (and preferably with higher wattage), for example "1N4744A"... icon_idea.gif

QUOTE(hiwnik @ Jun 24 2014, 07:40 PM)
Similarly discovered that at a few resistors resistance below set approximately on 40%: R19, R21, R22, R10, R33, R31. I found out the set resistance, but I would like to know, on what yet to pay attention at their replacement (firm-producer, tension).
Thank you for your useful advices. I wait an answer. smile.gif
*
Resistors should not be 40% off (that's too much). The most I would tolerate would be 10% off, and the most recommended tolerance is 5% or lower. Thus do check those resistors again. Anyway some of those resistors mentioned are simply 0R (zero Ohm) links such as R31 and R10 thus your measurement could be off due to the error offset on your meter. Thus do check the error offset of your meter, as it could have caused incorrect readings. As for properly measuring the resistors, you have to remove them off the board first otherwise surrounding connected components (including other resistors) could affect the measurement... hmm.gif

QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Jun 25 2014, 01:21 AM)
woah didn't expect someone from Ukraine to register just for this speaker. sifu lex need to entertain already laugh.gif
*
They (Creative Labs) no longer make beasts like these anymore. This GigaWorks S750 subwoofer is capable of reproducing frequencies below 35Hz or below 40Hz (the lowest frequency which most run-of-the-mill subwoofers are capable of), as mentioned in its specifications a very low 25Hz... cool.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jun 25 2014, 02:50 PM
Quazacolt
post Jun 25 2014, 02:49 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Jun 25 2014, 02:37 PM)
They (Creative Labs) no longer make beasts like these anymore. This GigaWorks S750 subwoofer is capable of reproducing frequencies below 35Hz or below 40Hz (the lowest frequency which most run-of-the-mill subwoofers are capable of), as mentioned in its specifications a very low 25Hz... cool.gif
*
see why i wanted to restore it so badly thumbup.gif
hiwnik
post Jun 27 2014, 01:24 AM

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Thanks for your detailed answer. Resistors really showed other indicators after their removal. But I will buy a new one resistor, as when trying to solder it into, he slipped out of the tweezers and lost smile.gif . I would also like to clarify: a diode D12 – is same 1N4004?
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post Jun 27 2014, 08:42 PM

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QUOTE(hiwnik @ Jun 27 2014, 01:24 AM)
Thanks for your detailed answer. Resistors really showed other indicators after their removal. But I will buy a new one resistor, as when trying to solder it into, he slipped out of the tweezers and lost  smile.gif . I would also like to clarify: a diode D12 – is same 1N4004?
*
The run-of-the-mill 1N4004 is just a normal/standard diode thus not suitable. That D12 is right after the transformer and this is a switching type power supply, thus you have to use either a schottky diode or a fast recovery diode. In other words, not the same... wink.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jun 27 2014, 08:44 PM
Cookie000
post Jul 22 2014, 12:33 PM

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Great guide Lex! thumbup.gif


Here's my board after 10 years of owning the s750. 4 bulged 470uF caps(yes all 4) still power up as normal with very looooow volume. Like not enough juice to power the amps.

user posted image

user posted image

user posted image

user posted image

user posted image

Stupid glue did a lot of damage except in the second pic. cry.gif

user posted image


This post has been edited by Cookie000: Jul 22 2014, 12:35 PM
TSlex
post Jul 22 2014, 07:26 PM

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QUOTE(Cookie000 @ Jul 22 2014, 12:33 PM)
Great guide Lex! thumbup.gif
Here's my board after 10 years of owning the s750. 4 bulged 470uF caps(yes all 4) still power up as normal with very looooow volume. Like not enough juice to power the amps.
Did you managed to fully revive the unit? Does it still suffer from very low volume after repairs? Check those 0R resistors situated right behind those big four 470uF 200VDC capacitors, in case the low volume problem still remains... hmm.gif

QUOTE(Cookie000 @ Jul 22 2014, 12:33 PM)
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Stupid glue did a lot of damage except in the second pic. cry.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
Looks like quite an amount of oxidation there (by the chemicals from degraded glue) as the copper layer looks dark and/or dull, instead of being shiny. After removing all those chunks degraded glue, try cleaning those exposed spots with IPA (isopropyl alcohol) to remove any remnants of chemicals from the decaying glue... wink.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Jul 22 2014, 07:28 PM
Cookie000
post Jul 22 2014, 11:26 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Jul 22 2014, 06:26 AM)
Did you managed to fully revive the unit? Does it still suffer from very low volume after repairs? Check those 0R resistors situated right behind those big four 470uF 200VDC capacitors, in case the low volume problem still remains... hmm.gif


Thanks for the reply Lex! Parts have been ordered from Digikey. Still waiting for the Fedex truck to arrive later today... mad.gif
QUOTE(lex @ Jul 22 2014, 06:26 AM)
Looks like quite an amount of oxidation there (by the chemicals from degraded glue) as the copper layer looks dark and/or dull, instead of being shiny. After removing all those chunks degraded glue, try cleaning those exposed spots with IPA (isopropyl alcohol) to remove any remnants of chemicals from the decaying glue... wink.gif
*
Cleaning the crusted goop is no fun grumble.gif

Here's my parts list:
QUOTE
- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/EE...11613-ND/483211

- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/10...1042-ND/3133969

- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/UH...-1579-ND/589320
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/UP...70-1-ND/4319749

- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/UC...3090-ND/4332721

- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/UH...-1547-ND/589288

- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heatsink
http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/AR...5096-ND/1913165

Shadowdace
post Aug 26 2014, 10:40 PM

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Hi ppl, Hi Lex
First of all, ty for this epic topic, i'm learning alot and mb will have a chance to save my s750 too.
Now here is my trouble:
I've the same typical meltdown aka flashing green light and brown glue of death. I tried to remove it painfully and regulary test it. Obviously I made a short circuit and both of my c40 blown out shocking.gif
Now I'm on my way to change all part Lex recommended but I've a doubt about this c40: Kukruse said It's a 100v cap but his reference links to a 50v cap (in parlist.doc)
I'm already extremely lost in the number of parts and nomenclature, I hope you can help me with this c40 (or an exhaustive list for the whole pack sweat.gif but I can deal with research)
Ty in avance

QUOTE(kukruse @ Jan 23 2014, 04:09 PM)
Hi, lex.
First af all, I am very thankful to you for this thread.
I have also a problem with my S750 set.
One day my S750 did not give the power at all. The main fuse was blown out. But I found also that on both amp.boards C40 were burned out totally - see picture.
Other components seems OK.
Attached Image
So because it was not clear why it happened, I decided to replace all components what were available at the Digi-Key.
Thus most of passive components were replaced - my BOM file is uploaded too. I did not test transistors/power ICs, but visually they were good.
At the final phase when I must to test my S750 I found that I lost my marks about how to connect amp. boards to the IO-board (the board with inputs/outputs) and to the power board.
Attached Image
Maybe somebody here can give me information about that.
Attached File  partlist.doc ( 79.5k ) Number of downloads: 537

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TSlex
post Aug 26 2014, 11:05 PM

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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Aug 26 2014, 10:40 PM)
Hi ppl, Hi Lex
First of all, ty for this epic topic, i'm learning alot and mb will have a chance to save my s750 too.
Now here is my trouble:
I've the same typical meltdown aka flashing green light and brown glue of death. I tried to remove it painfully and regulary test it. Obviously I made a short circuit and both of my c40 blown out  shocking.gif
Now I'm on my way to change all part Lex recommended but I've a doubt about this c40: Kukruse said It's a 100v cap but his reference links to a 50v cap (in parlist.doc)
I'm already extremely lost in the number of parts and nomenclature, I hope you can help me with this c40 (or an exhaustive list for the whole pack sweat.gif but I can deal with research)
Ty in avance
*
C40? Is that a ceramic disc capacitor? If it is then usually that is 10nF (or 10,000pF) and the recommended voltage rating is usually 1kV since its part of the snubber network around the rectifiers... hmm.gif

Shadowdace
post Aug 26 2014, 11:41 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 26 2014, 11:05 PM)

C40? Is that a ceramic disc capacitor? If it is then usually that is 10nF (or 10,000pF) and the recommended voltage rating is usually 1kV since its part of the snubber network around the rectifiers... hmm.gif
*



It's the orange one burned here:
user posted image

in the post of Kukruse https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/2873671/+80#
Is his partlist.doc looks good to you?

My studies in science and technical engineering are soooo gone cry.gif
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post Aug 27 2014, 02:02 AM

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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Aug 26 2014, 11:41 PM)
It's the orange one burned here:
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
in the post of Kukruse https://forum.lowyat.net/topic/2873671/+80#Is his partlist.doc looks good to you?
My studies in science and technical engineering are soooo gone  cry.gif
*
This is one of the power amplifier boards, and there are two of them. In fact both of them are identical. You can check the value of the capacitor on the other power amplifier board, in the same location. If that capacitor is in parallel with that big (1000uF 100VDC) electrolytic capacitor next to it, then very likely its a 100nF capacitor with voltage rating of at least 100V (following the big capacitor, can use capacitors with higher voltage rating also). Anyway, that capacitor may not be the only failed component on that board. Possibly that big (1000uF 100VDC) electrolytic capacitor next to it has some problems as well... hmm.gif

Shadowdace
post Aug 27 2014, 09:12 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Aug 27 2014, 02:02 AM)
This is one of the power amplifier boards, and there are two of them. In fact both of them are identical. You can check the value of the capacitor on the other power amplifier board, in the same location. If that capacitor is in parallel with that big (1000uF 100VDC) electrolytic capacitor next to it, then very likely its a 100nF capacitor with voltage rating of at least 100V (following the big capacitor, can use capacitors with higher voltage rating also). Anyway, that capacitor may not be the only failed component on that board. Possibly that big (1000uF 100VDC) electrolytic capacitor next to it has some problems as well... hmm.gif
*
Ok thanks a lot! It should be the FK20X7S2A475K whitch is described as a 100v than the FK20X7S1H475K (50v) witch is on partlist.doc

Btw I'll change every old/bad lytics and glue before re trying. This glue is awfully stuck on board, I'm scared of scratching something...
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post Aug 27 2014, 09:35 PM

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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Aug 27 2014, 09:12 PM)
Ok thanks a lot! It should be the FK20X7S2A475K whitch is described as a 100v than the  FK20X7S1H475K (50v) witch is on partlist.doc
This one is a 4.7uF 100V ceramic capacitor. It should follow the same voltage as that big capacitor next to it... hmm.gif

QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Aug 27 2014, 09:12 PM)
Btw I'll change every old/bad lytics and glue before re trying. This glue is awfully stuck on board, I'm scared of scratching something...
*
The one to get rid off are those that have turned yellowish to brownish color. The white colored glue is still fine, as its a different type of glue than the ones used on the rest of the boards... wink.gif

Shadowdace
post Aug 29 2014, 12:14 AM

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I don't understand very well the condensator's role. The FK20X7S2A475K seems good but it's very difficult to buy. What did I have to check for a new one? Same size and voltage obviously (100V like the big one on the pic) and 4.7 µF like the parlist of Kukruse. Is that all? I don't know the difference betwin ceramic and lytics..
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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Aug 29 2014, 12:14 AM)
I don't understand very well the condensator's role. The FK20X7S2A475K seems good but it's very difficult to buy. What did I have to check for a new one? Same size and voltage obviously (100V like the big one on the pic) and 4.7 µF like the parlist of Kukruse. Is that all? I don't know the difference betwin ceramic and lytics..
*
Actually you can use just any ceramic capacitor of the same capacitance (4.7uF) and voltage rating (100VDC). Typically I would choose NP0/C0G, U2J, X7R and X8R type ceramic capacitors (more stable across entire range of temperatures) rather than the cheaper Z5U and Y5V ceramic type capacitors (capacitance and impedance varies a lot with temperature). That big capacitor beside it is a general purpose capacitor. Usually if you find a ceramic capacitor in parallel with it then its one way which some manufacturers cut cost. Instead of using more expensive specialised low ESR/impedance capacitors, they would use cheaper general purpose capacitor with a cheap ceramic capacitor. The strength of ceramic capacitor is that it has very low ESR/impedance at high frequencies (typically in the switching power supply range). Thus that capacitor serves as a low ESR/impedance side to the bigger electrolytic capacitor (functions to bypass/filter and sink high frequency ripples off the rails that the bigger general purpose electrolytic capacitor unable to handle). And if the power rails are too noisy (often due to power supply failing) then that ceramic capacitor will be taking all the "heavy load" (trying to remove the ripples)... icon_rolleyes.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Aug 29 2014, 01:06 AM
Shadowdace
post Sep 5 2014, 12:31 AM

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Hi Lex
I would be eternally grateful for your help, everything works! thumbup.gif
I actually changed the big cap 450V on C61 and the cap 0.1µF 50V on C63 who are both dead (nothing on multimeter), C62 and C68 (they suffer too much from the proximity of the sink) and obviously I got rid off this glue (one off the most painfull work i've done vmad.gif ). On the amp board I've changed C40 (totally burned out), C39 (sligtly burned by C40), C81 and 91 glued to death...
Still have to replace the five 220µF and the five 100µF but It works!

Btw, I found the same problem I've before: The rear left output is down and I've some kind of cut in sound at higher level (above mid power depend of source) like a saturation. I can live without taking down the neighborhood's trinket but one way down is problematic...

Oh and thanks again for your advice that helped me so much ^^

This post has been edited by Shadowdace: Sep 5 2014, 05:28 AM
TSlex
post Sep 6 2014, 01:49 AM

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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Sep 5 2014, 12:31 AM)
Hi Lex
I would be eternally grateful for your help, everything works!  thumbup.gif
I actually changed the big cap 450V on C61 and the cap 0.1µF 50V on C63 who are both dead (nothing on multimeter), C62 and C68 (they suffer too much from the proximity of the sink) and obviously I got rid off this glue (one off the most painfull work i've done  vmad.gif ). On the amp board I've changed C40 (totally burned out), C39 (sligtly burned by C40), C81 and 91 glued to death...
Still have to replace the five 220µF and the five 100µF but It works!
Glad it worked. Should give those speakers a new lease of life... wink.gif

QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Sep 5 2014, 12:31 AM)
Btw, I found the same problem I've before: The rear left output is down and I've some kind of cut in sound at higher level (above mid power depend of source) like a saturation. I can live without taking down the neighborhood's trinket but one way down is problematic...

Oh and thanks again for your advice that helped me so much ^^
*
Have you cleaned the connectors on the power amplifier boards? Also you may have to clean the audio controller board and the I/O board (where the audio, control pod/dock and speaker connectors are located). Especially the I/O board, which is right under the audio controller board, has lots of degraded glue especially at the connector solder pins. That one is kinda hard to clean and require some proper tools... hmm.gif
Shadowdace
post Sep 6 2014, 04:39 AM

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QUOTE(lex @ Sep 6 2014, 01:49 AM)
Glad it worked. Should give those speakers a new lease of life... wink.gif

Have you cleaned the connectors on the power amplifier boards? Also you may have to clean the audio controller board and the I/O board (where the audio, control pod/dock and speaker connectors are located). Especially the I/O board, which is right under the audio controller board, has lots of degraded glue especially at the connector solder pins. That one is kinda hard to clean and require some proper tools... hmm.gif
*
I cleaned everything I could reach: Powerboard of course, degraded glue on both aux board (part brown, part white) and I cut the glue connexion between lytics on audio controller board (which is indeed the one on top with forty capacitor?). Some of the lytics still glued but no short circuit anymore.
Below audio controller, the I/O board contains two massives plates of glue: One top of the jack's enter, the other links the seven dual cable (red&black). This part requires desoldering the CN2 and CN4 line that I'm a bit afraid to do...
user posted image

user posted image

Do you think the soud's cut/saturation could come from C59/60/69/70 (or the 10 caps 220µF and 100µF on amp board) I have not change?

This post has been edited by Shadowdace: Sep 6 2014, 04:46 AM
TSlex
post Sep 6 2014, 11:00 PM

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QUOTE(Shadowdace @ Sep 6 2014, 04:39 AM)
I cleaned everything I could reach: Powerboard of course, degraded glue on both aux board (part brown, part white) and I cut the glue connexion between lytics on audio controller board (which is indeed the one on top with forty capacitor?). Some of the lytics still glued but no short circuit anymore.
Below audio controller, the I/O board contains two massives plates of glue: One top of the jack's enter, the other links the seven dual cable (red&black). This part requires desoldering the CN2 and CN4 line that I'm a bit afraid to do...
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Do you think the soud's cut/saturation could come from C59/60/69/70 (or the 10 caps 220µF and 100µF on amp board) I have not change?
*
Yups, those are the boards I've mentioned. Particularly that I/O board is just full of glue. I would recommend that you scrape it off, as there could be degraded glue hidden under it (and causing problems with some of the audio inputs there). If you do not want to desolder the board off (which is a lot of hard and difficult work, particularly since this is double sided PCB) then try usuing a thin long flat head screwdriver plus very fine but strong tweezers to remove those glue. Also remove any glue on the audio controller board especially those that cover the I.C pins. Have to be delicate as these are (delicate) SMD type components thus proceed with care and caution... sweat.gif

thebundok
post Sep 15 2014, 04:14 AM

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Hey Lex,

Really glad I found this thread as I'm really reluctant to give up on my S750's. Quite impressed that you've kept it going for over a year! Recently had a power outage at the house and the power kept trying to come back on. After the power finally returned for good, I had the dreaded pulsing green power light which then became no light. No power to the control box and no sound at all. cry.gif

I should preface that I'm a complete newb at this electrical engineering stuff. Aside from a little experience soldering an "Ultimate Useless Machine" I haven't really done much and I've never had experience with finding faults on a PCB. I can't find any capacitors that have bulged but since you mentioned they're low quality I figured I'd replace them anyway and hope it fixes the problem. Would you mind taking a look at this project order on Mouser just to ensure that I followed your recommended replacements well?

One piece I noticed that seems a little off, which maybe you can comment on, are the resistors(?) at D8 & D13 (circled in the first photo). If they're supposed to look like D7 and D6 then they look like they're possibly burned out. If you agree, can you enlighten me as to what type of resistors those are? They don't follow the normal convention I'm used to seeing of colored bands on beige. blush.gif

You mention a lot about removing the old glue, and I'm all but finished cleaning all the old bits of glue off (still a work in progress), but you don't mention anything about re-gluing. Is this something we should do after replacing capacitors? If so, how is that done? Honestly the board looks better without the glue so I'd be just fine leaving it off of there.

I've included some photos for your viewing pleasure. Thanks again for this post! I've found it incredibly helpful and enlightening. biggrin.gif

user posted image
user posted image
user posted image
user posted image
user posted image
TSlex
post Sep 16 2014, 12:57 AM

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QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 15 2014, 04:14 AM)
Hey Lex,
Really glad I found this thread as I'm really reluctant to give up on my S750's. Quite impressed that you've kept it going for over a year! Recently had a power outage at the house and the power kept trying to come back on. After the power finally returned for good, I had the dreaded pulsing green power light which then became no light. No power to the control box and no sound at all. cry.gif

I should preface that I'm a complete newb at this electrical engineering stuff. Aside from a little experience soldering an "Ultimate Useless Machine" I haven't really done much and I've never had experience with finding faults on a PCB. I can't find any capacitors that have bulged but since you mentioned they're low quality I figured I'd replace them anyway and hope it fixes the problem. Would you mind taking a look at this project order on Mouser just to ensure that I followed your recommended replacements well?
First off, that 470uF 200VDC capacitor is of wrong dimensions. Its too tall at 50mm. Plus the originals are "snap-in" types. Thus please follow of the capacitors I've selected, which should be this one: Mouser > Passive Components > Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors > Aluminum Electrolytic Capacitors - Snap In > Panasonic EET-ED2D471BA. And looks like that one is going to be EOL'ed (thus grab it while still available, because that one has one of the best specifications compared to the rest of the field)... nod.gif

QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 15 2014, 04:14 AM)
One piece I noticed that seems a little off, which maybe you can comment on, are the resistors(?) at D8 & D13 (circled in the first photo). If they're supposed to look like D7 and D6 then they look like they're possibly burned out. If you agree, can you enlighten me as to what type of resistors those are? They don't follow the normal convention I'm used to seeing of colored bands on beige.  blush.gif
Those are not really resistors. Sometimes they are called 0 Ohm resistors (single black band means "0"), but they are actually fusible links (that looks like resistors)... tongue.gif

QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 15 2014, 04:14 AM)
You mention a lot about removing the old glue, and I'm all but finished cleaning all the old bits of glue off (still a work in progress), but you don't mention anything about re-gluing. Is this something we should do after replacing capacitors? If so, how is that done? Honestly the board looks better without the glue so I'd be just fine leaving it off of there.
I've included some photos for your viewing pleasure. Thanks again for this post! I've found it incredibly helpful and enlightening. biggrin.gif
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
That glue to help hold the components (especially big ones) in place for easier soldering (in the factory). Other than that it has no use at all. Thus just remove those glue. And do not use anymore glue. The prolonged heat inside the subwoofer can degrade (cause chemical breakdown) those glue. Do clean with IPA (isopropyl alcohol) the areas where the glue was removed... icon_rolleyes.gif
thebundok
post Sep 16 2014, 05:50 AM

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Thanks for such a quick reply! notworthy.gif

QUOTE
First off, that 470uF 200VDC capacitor is of wrong dimensions. Its too tall at 50mm.

Wow, thanks for catching that. I thought I was being so careful, there were a few different links around this thread and I wasn't sure about the End of Life thing. doh.gif

QUOTE
Those are not really resistors.

Thanks for clarifying. In your opinion do they also need replacing? If so, is this what I'm looking for? unsure.gif

And one last curiosity question. When I bought the speakers, nearly 10 years ago, I was living in the US. Now I'm living in Europe. Is it possible to convert the sub to 220V and if so is it fairly easy to do? Is it possible to make it dual-voltage? 110-220V? hmm.gif (according to the input it's already 110-120V 50/60Hz)
TSlex
post Sep 16 2014, 11:34 PM

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QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 16 2014, 05:50 AM)
Thanks for such a quick reply!  notworthy.gif
Wow, thanks for catching that. I thought I was being so careful, there were a few different links around this thread and I wasn't sure about the End of Life thing.  doh.gif
Seems Panasonic decided to quit producing snap-ins. That Panasonic TS-ED series (actual datasheet here) has the best specifications among all, with ripple current handling of 1850mA@120Hz while the rest of the field have around 1400mA to 1600mA ripple current handling only (at 120Hz). Alternatives would be Nichicon GU series (which has lower ripple current handling)... nod.gif

QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 16 2014, 05:50 AM)
Thanks for clarifying. In your opinion do they also need replacing? If so, is this what I'm looking for?  unsure.gif
If they are not broken (should read as shorted on the multimeter) then no point replacing them. Yes, those are the "0 Ohm" resistors (actually fusible links)... wink.gif

QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 16 2014, 05:50 AM)
And one last curiosity question. When I bought the speakers, nearly 10 years ago, I was living in the US. Now I'm living in Europe. Is it possible to convert the sub to 220V and if so is it fairly easy to do? Is it possible to make it dual-voltage? 110-220V?  hmm.gif  (according to the input it's already 110-120V 50/60Hz)
*
That standby power section may be able to automatically adjust to new higher voltage (since its a standard flyback design), but the main power section may not be able to use a higher voltage (does not seem to have any feedback section). hmm.gif
thebundok
post Sep 25 2014, 09:40 PM

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QUOTE(lex @ Sep 16 2014, 04:34 PM)
Seems Panasonic decided to quit producing snap-ins. That Panasonic TS-ED series (actual datasheet here) has the best specifications among all, with ripple current handling of 1850mA@120Hz while the rest of the field have around 1400mA to 1600mA ripple current handling only (at 120Hz). Alternatives would be Nichicon GU series (which has lower ripple current handling)... nod.gif

If they are not broken (should read as shorted on the multimeter) then no point replacing them. Yes, those are the "0 Ohm" resistors (actually fusible links)... wink.gif

That standby power section may be able to automatically adjust to new higher voltage (since its a standard flyback design), but the main power section may not be able to use a higher voltage (does not seem to have any feedback section). hmm.gif
*
I just wanted to report that I followed your instructions to the letter and the speakers work again! rclxm9.gif

Mostly... now I don't get sound from the Center/Subwoofer or Side Channels. doh.gif The speakers are fine, if I change around the speaker connections in back I can test them individually and all speakers produce sound. Likewise, if I swap the center/subwoofer (orange) computer connection into the front connection (green) I get center from Left Front and Sub from Right Front. It's the same with the side channels. So there is a signal coming from the computer into the connection, but it gets lost between there and the speakers.

Any thoughts? unsure.gif

Regarding my previous question about switching from 110v to 230v, I noticed in the Schematics for PSU2 a paragraph on Voltage Selection.
user posted image

Based on this, is it possible I could pull the two Zero ohm links out and replace one at R31 only and get 230v or is it more complicated than that?

Thanks again for posting this tutorial. Really, very happy to have my speakers more or less working again. smile.gif
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post Sep 26 2014, 12:03 AM

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QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 25 2014, 09:40 PM)
I just wanted to report that I followed your instructions to the letter and the speakers work again!  rclxm9.gif

Mostly...  now I don't get sound from the Center/Subwoofer or Side Channels.  doh.gif  The speakers are fine, if I change around the speaker connections in back I can test them individually and all speakers produce sound. Likewise, if I swap the center/subwoofer (orange) computer connection into the front connection (green) I get center from Left Front and Sub from Right Front. It's the same with the side channels. So there is a signal coming from the computer into the connection, but it gets lost between there and the speakers.

Any thoughts?  unsure.gif
Have you tried removing the degraded glue from the audio controller and I/O boards, as well as the connectors on the cable that links the audio controller board to the power amplifier boards (as shown in earlier posts)? hmm.gif

QUOTE(thebundok @ Sep 25 2014, 09:40 PM)
Regarding my previous question about switching from 110v to 230v, I noticed in the Schematics for PSU2 a paragraph on Voltage Selection.
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
Based on this, is it possible I could pull the two Zero ohm links out and replace one at R31 only and get 230v or is it more complicated than that?

Thanks again for posting this tutorial. Really, very happy to have my speakers more or less working again. smile.gif
*
Not sure what's the actual difference between both 110V and 230V versions (since I have not worked on a 110V version), but you can try out and see if swapping/changing those connections will work... sweat.gif

This post has been edited by lex: Sep 26 2014, 12:20 AM
tezro
post Oct 24 2014, 11:04 AM

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Hi Mr Lex,

I would like to know what kind of equipment you use to desoldering all the faulty components?

Are you using a vacuum desoldering station or just a desoldering braid?

Thank you.
thebundok
post Oct 24 2014, 02:36 PM

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QUOTE(tezro @ Oct 24 2014, 04:04 AM)
Hi Mr Lex,

I would like to know what kind of equipment you use to desoldering all the faulty components?

Are you using a vacuum desoldering station or just a desoldering braid?

Thank you.
*
I'm not Lex, but I just recently did this repair and I was just fine with a non-fancy soldering iron and solder wick (braid). Some of the pieces I did have to use a solder sucker to get the remaining solder out of the hole once the piece was out, but I don't think you need a sophisticated vacuum soldering station.

Hope this helps. smile.gif
TSlex
post Oct 24 2014, 03:05 PM

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QUOTE(tezro @ Oct 24 2014, 11:04 AM)
Hi Mr Lex,

I would like to know what kind of equipment you use to desoldering all the faulty components?

Are you using a vacuum desoldering station or just a desoldering braid?

Thank you.
*
Just a 60W soldering iron, ordinary de-soldering pump (solder sucker) and solder flux. Make sure you have a soldering iron of sufficient wattage (minimum of 40W, recommended at least 60W or higher) because this is a double sided PCB. Just becareful of those smaller solder through holes with thin surrounding pads. Make sure you do not damage them with a much hotter soldering iron (avoid heating it up too long). icon_rolleyes.gif

kentu
post Nov 2 2014, 08:33 PM

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Hi lex.

I bought this creative s750 yesterday and when i was testing it, I used wrong power cable, it had 3 pins when the original has 2. So the fuse blew. Well I changed the fuse and tried to power it up with original power cable and nothing happens. I opened the amp and saw this. Is there anything what could be wrong now?


Attached Image
Attached Image



TSlex
post Nov 4 2014, 03:01 AM

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QUOTE(kentu @ Nov 2 2014, 08:33 PM)
Hi lex.

I bought this creative s750 yesterday and when i was testing it, I used wrong power cable, it had 3 pins when the original has 2. So the fuse blew. Well I changed the fuse and tried to power it up with original power cable and nothing happens. I opened the amp and saw this. Is there anything what could be wrong now?
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «
*
Nothing to do with the cable at all. Can actually use 3-pin plug, just that the Earth pin is ignored. From those pictures, highly likely the source of that brown out explosion is that (conductive) degraded glue. And the area affected is the feedback section of the standby power area. If you had read thru the guide (concerning the degraded glue issue) then you will know what I'm talking about... icon_rolleyes.gif

chiewming
post Dec 2 2014, 09:23 AM

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Lex, any chance to repair my G500 .....?
It has been almost a year de.

cry.gif cry.gif cry.gif cry.gif cry.gif

Thanks,
chiewming
Quazacolt
post Dec 2 2014, 02:40 PM

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QUOTE(chiewming @ Dec 2 2014, 09:23 AM)
Lex, any chance to repair my G500 .....?
It has been almost a year de.

cry.gif  cry.gif  cry.gif  cry.gif  cry.gif

Thanks,
chiewming
*
get in line first, mine more than a year laugh.gif
chiewming
post Dec 2 2014, 10:41 PM

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QUOTE(Quazacolt @ Dec 2 2014, 02:40 PM)
get in line first, mine more than a year laugh.gif
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Opss... Wasted letting my speaker to eat dust for such a long time...
Pity my speaker leh.. smile.gif
dlduscg
post Dec 4 2014, 05:47 AM

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Hi, I wud like to join this discussion about the s750 and try and get sum insight into my particular problem. Started with no power (no green light). Cleaned all degraded glue and replaced all recommended caps altho only found one 470 cap leaking, checked all suspect components, cleaned boards and reinstalled without input and without external spkrs. Applied power and green light came on and everything appeared normal. When I powered on the audio control unit I got a high pitch (varying intensity) sound coming from the sub. Changing the volume level on the control unit has no effect on the sound. Checked for ground loop without results. Suspect the filter cap on the audio board which I did not replace (1000 mfd 100v), but have not replaced it yet. Is there something I missed?
LordNubus2
post Dec 15 2014, 01:08 AM

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Hi,

My Creative Gigaworks stopped working. The light does not turn on, on the hub. I have started to clean the brown glue off the pcb. Please see below some images:

Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image

Will this capacitor be fine?
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/7153158P/

This post has been edited by LordNubus2: Dec 16 2014, 03:07 PM
electrified
post Jan 28 2015, 01:40 AM

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Hi @Lex and everybody!

My cousin's Gigaworks S750 stopped working ( he had them repaired once already ) yesterday and he brought them to me to see if I can get it fixed.

I checked the capacitors on the input filtering side of the SMPS ( PSU ), they're Rubycon and they seem to be in perfect condition.

I started troubleshooting it and found out a "blown" capacitor, at position C62, the electrolytic capacitor that was covered inside a black insulation.

After I replaced it with a new Rubycon with similar specs ( same voltage, just a little bit higher capacitance ) the green power light started to light up, but not steadily.
It is blinking.
Whenever I hook up any of the two "amplification boards" to any of the two "outputs to amplifier boards" from the PSU PCB, the light starts to blink and I hear a clicking sound repeating endlessly.

If I disconnect the amplifier boards from the PSU and only connect the PSU with the main circuit board the green power light stays on and doesn't blink.

Any ideas what could be causing this ?

I'm uploading a video on youtube so you can hear the repeating clicking noise that I get once I connect the amplifier board/s to the PSU PCB's connectors.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_BAwNEEhOE



This post has been edited by electrified: Jan 28 2015, 02:40 AM
dlduscg
post Jan 28 2015, 05:01 AM

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QUOTE(electrified @ Jan 28 2015, 01:40 AM)
Hi @Lex and everybody!

My cousin's Gigaworks S750 stopped working ( he had them repaired once already ) yesterday and he brought them to me to see if I can get it fixed.

I checked the capacitors on the input filtering side of the SMPS ( PSU ), they're Rubycon and they seem to be in perfect condition.

I started troubleshooting it and found out a "blown" capacitor, at position C62, the electrolytic capacitor that was covered inside a black insulation.

After I replaced it with a new Rubycon with similar specs ( same voltage, just a little bit higher capacitance ) the green power light started to light up, but not steadily.
It is blinking.
Whenever I hook up any of the two "amplification boards" to any of the two "outputs to amplifier boards" from the PSU PCB, the light starts to blink and I hear a clicking sound repeating endlessly.

If I disconnect the amplifier boards from the PSU and only connect the PSU with the main circuit board the green power light stays on and doesn't blink.

Any ideas what could be causing this ?

I'm uploading a video on youtube so you can hear the repeating clicking noise that I get once I connect the amplifier board/s to the PSU PCB's connectors.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_BAwNEEhOE


*
Hi, glad someone else is here, its been lonely since Lex disappeared a couple months ago. I replaced that cap also when I replaced all of them on that board, and when I started up the green light was lit and no blinking. However, as my post sez I still have a problem with noise coming from the sub. Since I have been unable to get a schematic of the amp boards I haven't made any progress. I did find a bad cap c40 on the amp board across the 1000 uf 100v electrolytic and sent for caps to replace the two c40 ceramics and the both of the electrolytics. I hope I don't have to replace all the caps on those boards. Anyway Its good to have you with us and maybe one of us can get this thing fixed.

The clicking noise you are getting, is it from the sub, and if so can you control the volume? I believe these caps I am replacing may be part of your problem as well. The noise I am getting disappears when I disconnect the ribbon connector from the amp that outputs the sides/center/sub only. All of the other outputs which come from the other amp board work fine.

This post has been edited by dlduscg: Jan 28 2015, 05:45 AM
dlduscg
post Jan 28 2015, 06:03 AM

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QUOTE(LordNubus2 @ Dec 15 2014, 01:08 AM)
Hi,

My Creative Gigaworks stopped working.  The light does not turn on, on the hub. I have started to clean the brown glue off the pcb.  Please see below some images:

Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image
Attached Image

Will this capacitor be fine?
http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/products/7153158P/
*
Too high. Try Rubycon MXP 470 uf 200 V 105 Radial Snapin Dia 22mm Ht 37mm lead space 10mm
Ricter
post Jan 29 2015, 06:33 AM

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Hi lex thx for the post.

I followed all the steps to fix the power supply .The speakers in but never heard , not where the problem for please need your help.
electrified
post Jan 29 2015, 08:20 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Jan 27 2015, 11:01 PM)
Hi, glad someone else is here, its been lonely since Lex disappeared a couple months ago. I replaced that cap also when I replaced all of them on that board, and when I started up the green light was lit and no blinking. However, as my post sez I still have a problem with noise coming from the sub. Since I have been unable to get a schematic of the amp boards I haven't made any progress. I did find a bad cap c40 on the amp board across the 1000 uf 100v electrolytic and sent for caps to replace the two c40 ceramics and the both of the electrolytics. I hope I don't have to replace all the caps on those boards. Anyway Its good to have you with us and maybe one of us can get this thing fixed.

The clicking noise you are getting, is it from the sub, and if so can you control the volume? I believe these caps I am replacing may be part of your problem as well. The noise I am getting disappears when I disconnect the ribbon connector from the amp that outputs the sides/center/sub only. All of the other outputs which come from the other amp board work fine.
*
The clicking noise seems to be originating ( used a digital decibel-o-meter to pinpoint the source ) was coming from the transformer ( T3 ).
After some modifications things went south due to my lazy and totally confined and out of order workspace, and I happened to turn on the unit with a screw somewhere between the transformer's input and the surrounding mosfets and... kaboom!
Sparks and fire!

I'm giving up on repairing the POS design PSU.
I'll make a custom PSU to drive the amps myself as I have most of the stuff I need here, so long Creative's cheap-ass SMPS.
Quazacolt
post Jan 29 2015, 12:41 PM

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QUOTE(electrified @ Jan 29 2015, 08:20 AM)
After some modifications things went south due to my lazy and totally confined and out of order workspace, and I happened to turn on the unit with a screw somewhere between the transformer's input and the surrounding mosfets and... kaboom!
Sparks and fire!


I'm giving up on repairing the POS design PSU.
I'll make a custom PSU to drive the amps myself as I have most of the stuff I need here, so long Creative's cheap-ass SMPS.
*
that sounds pretty damn exciting shocking.gif
do let us know your outcome of the custom PSU

This post has been edited by Quazacolt: Jan 29 2015, 12:41 PM
LordNubus2
post Jan 30 2015, 07:58 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Jan 27 2015, 10:03 PM)
Too high. Try Rubycon MXP 470 uf 200 V 105 Radial Snapin Dia 22mm Ht 37mm lead space 10mm
*
Hey. Thanks for the reply. I have removed all capacitors from the board, some of the green stuff has pealed away revealing the copper?, hope this will work still :-(. When i have time i will try to replace the caps. This is my first soldiering project. I get confused about things like snap capacitors or ones without snap as i am not sure they will go into the holes etc. I will read more and post some photos , if someone could help me after that especially which capacitor and if i need to replace or test other components, i would be very greatful.

This post has been edited by LordNubus2: Jan 30 2015, 07:59 AM
thebundok
post Jan 31 2015, 01:43 AM

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Hey Lex (or anyone that's reading),

If you've seen my previous posts you know I was successful in resurrecting my S750 by replacing all the capacitors Lex suggested. Just a couple weeks ago wife and I were sitting on the couch and heard a loud pop. Pulled open the sub and found this:

Before cleaning:
user posted image

After cleaning:
user posted image

The capacitor with the missing lead (it exploded clean off) is one of the new ones I had replaced in the first round.

My question is, can I just replace the busted capacitor or do I need to replace that blue thing as well (and if so, what is it)?
Is there enough green landscape to make the repair worth it or will it blow up again?
Is there anything else I should do?

Cheers mates.
dlduscg
post Jan 31 2015, 10:08 PM

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QUOTE(electrified @ Jan 29 2015, 08:20 AM)
The clicking noise seems to be originating ( used a digital decibel-o-meter to pinpoint the source ) was coming from the transformer ( T3 ).
After some modifications things went south due to my lazy and totally confined and out of order workspace, and I happened to turn on the unit with a screw somewhere between the transformer's input and the surrounding mosfets and... kaboom!
Sparks and fire!

I'm giving up on repairing the POS design PSU.
I'll make a custom PSU to drive the amps myself as I have most of the stuff I need here, so long Creative's cheap-ass SMPS.
*
Sorry to hear that electrified, the hope for my repair depends also on every one else successes. I believe the clicking sound you had was not audio but mechanical possibly coming from the start relay. Now it appears you have complicated things with the blow up you have described. Hope you are still in the game, but if not, good luck and sorry I could not help.
dlduscg
post Jan 31 2015, 10:43 PM

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QUOTE(LordNubus2 @ Jan 30 2015, 07:58 AM)
Hey. Thanks for the reply. I have removed all capacitors from the board, some of the green stuff has pealed away revealing the copper?, hope this will work still :-(. When i have time i will try to replace the caps. This is my first soldiering project. I get confused about things like snap capacitors or ones without snap as i am not sure they will go into the holes etc. I will read more and post some photos , if someone could help me after that especially which capacitor and if i need to replace or test other components, i would be very greatful.
*
It sounds like you are off to a good start. However, as stated in previous posts, all electrolytic caps on the main power board should be removed. Caps are rather inexpensive and can be obtained from Digi-Key.com. For the ones you were looking for 470 uf 200v, they will likely be Snap-In type and will set into the holes, lock in and solder easily into the space provided as long as the dimensions of the cap are correct. Digi-key part number P11613 mfgr part EETED2D471BA fits perfectly, or the Rubycon I suggested will work as well.

Caps are relatively inexpensive and replacing them will eliminate present and future problems.

Extreme care should be observed when removing and installing components, especially the caps with the feed through connections. I have found that a 30 watt solder iron with a pencil tip works best. Also to ensure the components are removed quickly and cleanly, I got a can of "duster" which is essentially bottled air under pressure, from Radio Shack or Walmart. Using the plastic tip provided with the can or a longer one of your own be used to concentrate the air pressure to the solder tip area to blow out the solder at the same time as the component is removed to ensure a clean removal without damage to the pads or holes. You will have to be careful that the solder does not spray all over the boards by placing a cloth beneath the board you are working on. Of course copper braid works fine if you are careful to not drag the pad off the board.

Bare copper can be covered by using a non conductive acrylic to prevent corrosion. I can help with getting those caps you need if you want.

Removing the glue should be done by carefully scraping/pushing off the glue without scratching the board and green coating. It takes patience and time, but may be the difference in saving the unit. I have found some dental tools helpful and they also have rounded edges which do not damage the board.

Good luck and hope I can help.
dlduscg
post Jan 31 2015, 11:02 PM

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QUOTE(thebundok @ Jan 31 2015, 01:43 AM)
Hey Lex (or anyone that's reading),

If you've seen my previous posts you know I was successful in resurrecting my S750 by replacing all the capacitors Lex suggested. Just a couple weeks ago wife and I were sitting on the couch and heard a loud pop. Pulled open the sub and found this:

Before cleaning:
user posted image

After cleaning:
user posted image

The capacitor with the missing lead (it exploded clean off) is one of the new ones I had replaced in the first round.

My question is, can I just replace the busted capacitor or do I need to replace that blue thing as well (and if so, what is it)?
Is there enough green landscape to make the repair worth it or will it blow up again?
Is there anything else I should do?

Cheers mates.
*
The short might have occurred because of some glue left on the board or a defective connection after replacing the cap. That is only a possibility and could have been something else, however you will have to clean up the area with special care, removing all trace of glue and other deposits while keeping the solder hole intact. Make sure the heat sink is not shorting to the caps. Then you will have to replace the electrolytic cap as well as the one next to it. I believe they are C62 and C7. U2 next to the C7 and D26 zener diode should be checked as well. You may want to replace the electrolytic that got zapped with a high temp ceramic as I believe Lex suggested, and may have been the cause of the problem because it is so clse to the heat sink.

MG Chemicals acrylic conformal coating for pcb catalog 419c 55ml clear is suitable to protect bare copper on pcb.

This post has been edited by dlduscg: Feb 1 2015, 10:03 PM
chiewming
post Feb 1 2015, 06:16 PM

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Lex seem MIA for sometimes...

bobbyh222
post Feb 1 2015, 10:06 PM

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i just would like some part info like what is the t2 replacement and what are the Q1 Q2Q3Q$ HELP PLEASE
dlduscg
post Feb 1 2015, 10:35 PM

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QUOTE(bobbyh222 @ Feb 1 2015, 10:06 PM)
i just would like some part info  like what is the t2 replacement and what are the Q1 Q2Q3Q$  HELP  PLEASE
*
The T2 info should be on the transformer itself. The Q1,Q2,Q3s are IRF740 MOSFET transistors, 10A 400V TO-220 type case, and generally cost as low as 5.00 dols depending where you buy them.
thebundok
post Feb 2 2015, 01:57 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Jan 31 2015, 04:02 PM)
I believe they are C62 and C7. U2 next to the C7 and D26 zener diode should be checked as well. You may want to replace the electrolytic that got zapped with a high temp ceramic as I believe Lex suggested, and may have been the cause of the problem because it is so clse to the heat sink.
*
So, I know what C62 is as that's one of the capacitors I had to replace before, but I have no clue what to look for with C7, U2 or D26. Can you help me out there?

If I recall correctly, the capacitor he suggested replacing with a high temp ceramic was actually C63 (and I did replace that one with a ceramic) but could do the same with this one if that's likely to be the issue.
Ricter
post Feb 3 2015, 04:18 AM

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QUOTE(Ricter @ Jan 29 2015, 06:33 AM)
Hi lex thx for the post.

I followed all the steps to fix the power supply .The speakers in but never heard , not where the problem for please need your help.
*
help me pls
dlduscg
post Feb 4 2015, 11:42 AM

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QUOTE(thebundok @ Feb 2 2015, 01:57 AM)
So, I know what C62 is as that's one of the capacitors I had to replace before, but I have no clue what to look for with C7, U2 or D26. Can you help me out there?

If I recall correctly, the capacitor he suggested replacing with a high temp ceramic was actually C63 (and I did replace that one with a ceramic) but could do the same with this one if that's likely to be the issue.
*
Unless there is obvious evidence that other components nearby may be the cause, I would assume a faulty connection when C62 replacement or glue remnants caused the short, and clean up the area very carefully while checking for a possible defect on the board. If there is evidence of being burnt or damage to other components, then I would consider replacing them as well. D26 is a 24V Zener diode but if a simple front to back resistance check looks good I would not replace it. Likewise if the C7 blue capacitor is intact and does not show a short I would also leave it alone for now. C7 is 470p 250V ac safety cap. It is not possible to know whether or not heat was a factor, I rather doubt it.

This post has been edited by dlduscg: Feb 4 2015, 11:55 AM
dlduscg
post Feb 4 2015, 11:47 AM

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QUOTE(Ricter @ Feb 3 2015, 04:18 AM)
help me pls
*
Sorry, I do not know of your problem and Lex has not been on for quite a while. If you want to give me some info, I can see if I can be of help.

This post has been edited by dlduscg: Feb 4 2015, 11:48 AM
LordNubus2
post Feb 5 2015, 06:10 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Jan 31 2015, 02:43 PM)
It sounds like you are off to a good start. However, as stated in previous posts, all electrolytic caps on the main power board should be removed. Caps are rather inexpensive and can be obtained from Digi-Key.com. For the ones you were looking for 470 uf 200v, they will likely be Snap-In type and will set into the holes, lock in and solder easily into the space provided as long as the dimensions of the cap are correct. Digi-key part number P11613 mfgr part EETED2D471BA fits perfectly, or the Rubycon I suggested will work as well.

Caps are relatively inexpensive and replacing them will eliminate present and future problems.

Extreme care should be observed when removing and installing components, especially the caps with the feed through connections. I have found that a 30 watt solder iron with a pencil tip works best. Also to ensure the components are removed quickly and cleanly, I got a can of "duster" which is essentially bottled air under pressure, from Radio Shack or Walmart. Using the plastic tip provided with the can or a longer one of your own be used to concentrate the air pressure to the solder tip area to blow out the solder at the same time as the component is removed to ensure a clean removal without damage to the pads or holes. You will have to be careful that the solder does not spray all over the boards by placing a cloth beneath the board you are working on. Of course copper braid works fine if you are careful to not drag the pad off the board.

Bare copper can be covered by using a non conductive acrylic to prevent corrosion. I can help with getting those caps you need if you want.

Removing the glue should be done by carefully scraping/pushing off the glue without scratching the board and green coating. It takes patience and time, but may be the difference in saving the unit. I have found some dental tools helpful and they also have rounded edges which do not damage the board.

Good luck and hope I can help.
*
Hi, thank you for this information. I am using a pencil tip soldering iron. I dont have bottled air but i have a sucker which pulls the soldier up, away from the board when heating the area. It seems to work alright that way. Is the non conductive arylic some sort of spray paint? i have not got around to taking any photos yet , sorry for this and i need to carefully read what all the electrolytic caps means. such as if it includes the blue, black and brownish smaller components or not. at the moment i have just removed all the cylindrical components, small and big which i thought were capacitors. i am worrying that my board will go rusty now as it has exposed areas. i feel all of this work is very difficult, even though the price of caps are cheap, the time and effort seems high. i also have a multimeter if this helps but i am scared to test stuff with it. So when i have some more time i will show you what i have and also look at the caps you sugguest. i would appreciate the help in selecting the caps. i live in the UK, if you could just list website links , then i can just make an order quick.
dlduscg
post Feb 5 2015, 11:16 AM

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QUOTE(LordNubus2 @ Feb 5 2015, 06:10 AM)
Hi, thank you for this information. I am using a pencil tip soldering iron.  I dont have bottled air but i have a sucker which pulls the soldier up, away from the board when heating the area. It seems to work alright that way. Is the non conductive arylic some sort of spray paint? i have not got around to taking any photos yet , sorry for this and i need to carefully read what all the electrolytic caps means. such as if it includes the blue, black and brownish smaller components or not. at the moment i have just removed all the cylindrical components, small and big which i thought were capacitors. i am worrying that my board will go rusty now as it has exposed areas. i feel all of this work is very difficult, even though the price of caps are cheap, the time and effort seems high. i also have a multimeter if this helps but i am scared to test stuff with it. So when i have some more time i will show you what i have and also look at the caps you sugguest. i would appreciate the help in selecting the caps. i live in the UK, if you could just list website links , then i can just make an order quick.
*
You seem to be doing fine with the solder which is also a good way to remove solder safely. I think you need to go back to the beginning of this topic, all the way back to page 1 and read through it to understand and gain a thorough knowledge of this project. The bare copper areas you mention, and I hope there are few, can be coated after you have completed work in those areas. I found MG Chemicals Acrylic Conformal Coating item 419C-55ml available on Amazon to be a good product to seal those areas and prevent corrosion and future problems. It is a clear liquid in a small 55ml size bottle with a small brush applicator.

You should also obtain the schematics for the power supply, you can find them at the following link: http://www.tgahinfo.homecall.co.uk/S750%20...y%20Schematics/

Then read all the comments concerning removing the degraded glue.

In addition, you will find other types of capacitors on this board as well as many other components which are not caps. You will find out more information when you get the schematics and understand how to locate the various devices on the board. The small brown discs and the blue ones are ceramic type capacitors. There are also resistors, diode rectifiers, transformers, coils, inductors, etc., which you will be able to identify later when you get the schematic. The only ones of these you need to replace are the ones which you see damaged or have been suspected of being faulty.

The following is a list of all the electrolytic capacitors on the PSU board that should be replaced because they are of inferior quality and may be the cause of your present problem or future problems:

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heat sink.

You should have not removed any other caps or components at this time.


You can probably get all of these at www.digi-key.com. I will give you the exact digi-key order number if you want.

In addition, I hope you will learn how to use your multi meter correctly and safely before attempting to use it. Your meter can be seriously damaged if you attempt to measure voltage with the selector in the range for resistance, and if the range is too low for the current or voltage you are measuring. Please be careful.

I will check back from time to time to see how you are doing, and if you need help. Good luck.

dlduscg
post Feb 5 2015, 11:33 AM

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QUOTE(LordNubus2 @ Feb 5 2015, 06:10 AM)
Hi, thank you for this information. I am using a pencil tip soldering iron.  I dont have bottled air but i have a sucker which pulls the soldier up, away from the board when heating the area. It seems to work alright that way. Is the non conductive arylic some sort of spray paint? i have not got around to taking any photos yet , sorry for this and i need to carefully read what all the electrolytic caps means. such as if it includes the blue, black and brownish smaller components or not. at the moment i have just removed all the cylindrical components, small and big which i thought were capacitors. i am worrying that my board will go rusty now as it has exposed areas. i feel all of this work is very difficult, even though the price of caps are cheap, the time and effort seems high. i also have a multimeter if this helps but i am scared to test stuff with it. So when i have some more time i will show you what i have and also look at the caps you sugguest. i would appreciate the help in selecting the caps. i live in the UK, if you could just list website links , then i can just make an order quick.
*
Before we go any further, you should not attempt to work on this project without having a thorough understanding of electricity and the extremely dangerous hazard to your life if you do not observe the proper safety precautions to protect yourself at all times. I know this should have been established a the very beginning of our discussion, and therefore I will need your assurance; that you are capable of handling this complex technical project, and will seek help locally if you venture into uncharted waters. Take care.
Ricter
post Feb 5 2015, 09:24 PM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Feb 4 2015, 11:47 AM)
Sorry, I do not know of your problem and Lex has not been on for quite a while. If you want to give me some info, I can see if I can be of help.
*
I've fixed the power supplier part but when I connect all of it, the speakers don't work, the most curious thing is that if I connect the headphones to the speakers volume control it work. The speakers turn on but they dont make a noise. hmm.gif icon_question.gif
LordNubus2
post Feb 6 2015, 06:19 AM

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Joined: Dec 2014
From: London


QUOTE(dlduscg @ Feb 5 2015, 03:16 AM)
You seem to be doing fine with the solder which is also a good way to remove solder safely. I think you need to go back to the beginning of this topic, all the way back to page 1 and read through it to understand and gain a thorough knowledge of this project. The bare copper areas you mention, and I hope there are few, can be coated after you have completed work in those areas. I found MG Chemicals Acrylic Conformal Coating item 419C-55ml available on Amazon to be a good product to seal those areas and prevent corrosion and future problems. It is a clear liquid in a small 55ml size bottle with a small brush applicator.

You should also obtain the schematics for the power supply, you can find them at the following link: http://www.tgahinfo.homecall.co.uk/S750%20...y%20Schematics/ 

Then read all the comments concerning removing the degraded glue.

In addition, you will find other types of capacitors on this board as well as many other components which are not caps.  You will find out more information when you get the schematics and understand how to locate the various devices on the board. The small brown discs and the blue ones are ceramic type capacitors. There are also resistors, diode rectifiers, transformers, coils, inductors, etc., which you will be able to identify later when you get the schematic. The only ones of these you need to replace are the ones which you see damaged or have been suspected of being faulty.

The following is a list of all the electrolytic capacitors on the PSU board that should be replaced because they are of inferior quality and may be the cause of your present problem or future problems:

- 4x 470uF 200V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 330uF 100V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 220uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 5x 100uF 35V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 68uF 450V 105C, high ripple handling type (for inverter and/or ballast operation)
- 2x 47uF 25V 105C, low impedance and/or low ESR type (for SMPS operation)
- 1x 0.1uF 50V 105C, high temperature type prefered (such as ceramic) as its very close to the heat sink.

You should have not removed any other caps or components at this time.
You can probably get all of these at www.digi-key.com. I will give you the exact digi-key order number if you want.

In addition, I hope you will learn how to use your multi meter correctly and safely before attempting to use it. Your meter can be seriously damaged if you attempt to measure voltage with the selector in the range for resistance, and if the range is too low for the current or voltage you are measuring. Please be careful.

I will check back from time to time to see how you are doing, and if you need help. Good luck.
*
Hi,

Thank you for the reply. Could you list the exact digi key order number for me for the above list please. i will double check what i have removed but this seems the same amount. i did have a read a while ago from page one but maybe i must read this again as i have obviously missed important parts and get back to you. :-). i have not attempted to use my multimeter and feel i would only do so if really necessary.
LordNubus2
post Feb 6 2015, 06:25 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Feb 5 2015, 03:33 AM)
Before we go any further, you should not attempt to work on this project without having a thorough understanding of electricity and the extremely dangerous hazard to your life if you do not observe the proper safety precautions to protect yourself at all times. I know this should have been established a the very beginning of our discussion, and therefore I will need your assurance; that you are capable of handling this complex technical project, and will seek help locally if you venture into uncharted waters. Take care.
*
Hi thank you for your concern. I will be very careful when dealing with electricity. i have not attempted to use my multimeter as of yet and have an understanding of how dangerous electricity can be. I do agree this should be an important statement at the beginning of the discussion. I will try my best to seek help if it comes down to this. I am a technical person, have done some simple circuitry in the past but not in extensive detail.

This post has been edited by LordNubus2: Feb 6 2015, 06:26 AM
dlduscg
post Feb 6 2015, 10:03 AM

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QUOTE(Ricter @ Feb 5 2015, 09:24 PM)
I've fixed the power supplier part but when I connect all of it, the speakers don't work, the most curious thing is that if I connect the headphones to the speakers volume control it work. The speakers turn on but they dont make a noise.    hmm.gif  icon_question.gif
*
Are you using the audio control to turn on the power?
dlduscg
post Feb 6 2015, 11:19 AM

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QUOTE(LordNubus2 @ Feb 6 2015, 06:19 AM)
Hi,

Thank you for the reply. Could you list the exact digi key order number for me for the above list please. i will double check what i have removed but this seems the same amount. i did have a read a while ago from page one but maybe i must read this again as i have obviously missed important parts and get back to you. :-). i have not attempted to use my multimeter and feel i would only do so if really necessary.
*
Thanks for your understanding. Of course you will use your meter to check for resistance, shorts, connections, etc., it is only when you go on a live circuit will you be exposed to dangerous conditions that even the most experienced must be extremely careful and I know now from your email that you are experienced, that was my main concern. Ok, here is the list of digi-key part numbers for the 20 capacitors you should replace. All except for the last one are electrolytic radial can type capacitors; the last one is the ceramic that is near the heat sink and is recommended to use instead of the electrolytic can you removed. If there are any (end of life) that you are unable to get, I can help you with a substitution.

(4) 470uf 200V snap type Panasonic P11613-ND

(2) 330uf 100V Rubycon 1189-1042-ND

(5) 220uf 35V Nichicon 493-1579-ND

(5) 100uf 50V Nichicon 493-11570-1-ND

(1) 68uf 450V Nichicon 493-13090-ND

(2) 47uf 25V Nichicon 493-1547-ND

(1) .1uf 50V Nichicon 478-5096-ND

That should do it for now. Let me know if you have problems.

This post has been edited by dlduscg: Feb 6 2015, 11:20 AM
Ricter
post Feb 10 2015, 01:23 AM

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QUOTE(dlduscg @ Feb 6 2015, 10:03 AM)
Are you using the audio control to turn on the power?
*
yes
dlduscg
post Feb 10 2015, 02:46 AM

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QUOTE(Ricter @ Feb 10 2015, 01:23 AM)
yes