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> The newbie guide to power supply units, Questions and comments are welcomed

chocobo7779
post Dec 8 2012, 11:24 PM, updated 2 months ago

Power is nothing without control
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Introduction
I often come across with those questions such as:
1. What PSU is suitable for my rig?
2. Which PSU is better?
3. X Watts is enough for this build?
4. Is this PSU good? Got high power ripple?
and so on...

Well, to answer these questions.... I have opened this thread. This thread also serves as a reference guide for choosing a good PSU.

How do I choose a good PSU?
Well, this one is hard, considering picking a 'good' PSU can be tricky.
However, here are some characteristics of a good PSU, that are:
1. The 'real' wattage the PSU can output
2. Total wattage of +12V rail
3. Power ripple, noise and voltage regulation of each rails
4. Component quality
5. Brand
6. The manufacturer of the PSU
7. The efficiency of the PSU



So, let us break this down into smaller sections, shall we?

1. The 'real' wattage
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


2. Total wattage of +12V rails
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


3. Power ripple, noise and voltage regulation
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


....To be continued...


4. Component quality
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


5. Brand
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


6. The manufacturer of the PSU
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


7. The efficiency
» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


Conclusion
As a conclusion, there are quite a few aspects that make a good PSU. Despite a good PSU can cost a bit, but having them is always good. Any questions and comments are welcomed.
You may ask for PSU recommendation here. wink.gif

References
http://www.overclock.net/t/715889/psu-articles#post9110838
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/181

Useful links
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page541.htm (A database of PSU reviews)
http://www.overclock.net/t/738097/psu-review-database
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com
http://www.jonnyguru.com

This post has been edited by chocobo7779: Dec 11 2012, 09:02 AM
sulfuriq
post Dec 8 2012, 11:58 PM

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good tutorial bro!
JakeGFX
post Dec 9 2012, 12:01 AM

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SOO MUCH WORDS!!! I don't mind reading but if people come in for a brief read, I think they would bored out but I appreciate that long info about PSU
nerdlessguy
post Dec 9 2012, 12:09 AM

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Nice job,but if show cpu+mobo+gc +ram+hhd+usb+fan should be more easy for newbie?

And 80+ , power efficient level?Bronze, Silver, Gold,and Platinum

Just recommend laugh.gif overall good job thumbup.gif laugh.gif
marfccy
post Dec 9 2012, 01:11 AM

Le Ponyland!!!
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mod please pin this!!

good job there chocobo!! rclxms.gif

waiting for next part
AceCombat
post Dec 9 2012, 01:19 AM


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http://forum.lowyat.net/topic/450882

This is one similiar topic, maybe you can ask the moderators to merge everything biggrin.gif
Najmods
post Dec 9 2012, 01:55 AM

*mutter mutter mutter mutter*
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From: Konohana


I don't really read it, but here's some my food of thought about it:

1) Get straight to the point a lot of people don't like wall of text, also bold important ones. Put space in between one Q&A with another so it would be better to read and for people to identify the question and the answer.

2) Don't use too much '...'. Its pretty annoying to read. Also bold out question and put answer below that instead in the same paragraph. Point form would be better to read than paragraph.

3) Put [ url= <your link here] <your description here> [/ url] to put a link as that would be better. And you did 'stole' images from HardwareSecrets, and they don't like hotlinking like that, most website don't. Instead put the url here instead of the image url. Or save the picture and upload it here, but put a link to where you get that image from.

All in all, when in doubt look for other thread that similar to this. You can check out my CSL Mi410 user thread and ASUS k40/k50AB from my signature. Its not perfect, but it should give you ideas smile.gif

This post has been edited by Najmods: Dec 9 2012, 02:02 AM
chocobo7779
post Dec 9 2012, 09:08 AM

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Recommended PSUs
Here is a list of recommended PSUs you can buy here. They will be sorted according to their wattage.
Note: Not complete!
(E) denotes entry level
(M) denotes modular/semi-modular
* Denotes highly recommended PSUs

Less than 501W
FSP Hexa 400W (E)
Seasonic X-400 (Fanless) (M)
Silverstone Strider Essential 400W (E)
Gigabyte N400A PSU (E)
Gigabyte 420W PSU (E)
Corsair CX430
Antec VP450
Cooler Master GX450
Gigabyte PoweRock 500W
FSP Hexa 500W
Corsair CX500 *
Enermax NAXN 500W


Between 501W and 600W
Antec High Current Gamer 520M (M) *
Seasonic G 550 (M) *
Rosewill Capstone 550W (M) *
Enermax NAXN 550W
Rosewill Hive 550W (M)
Antec Earthwatts Platinum 550W *
Corsair GS600
Cooler Master Silent Pro M600 (M) *
FSP Aurum 600W
Enermax NAXN 600W *


Between 601W and 700W
Antec High Current Gamer 620M (M) *
Seasonic S12II 620W *
Seasonic M12II 620W (M) *
Rosewill Capstone 650W (M) *
Corsair TX650 v2 (M) *
Enermax NAXN 650W (M)
Seasonic X-650 (M) *
Corsair AX650 (M) *
Corsair HX650 (M) *
Rosewill Tachyon 650W (M) *
Rosewill Hive 650W (M) *
XFX 650W XXX Edition (M) *
Antec Earthwatts Platinum 650W *
FSP Aurum 700W
Cooler Master Silent Pro M700 (M)
Corsair GS700
Enermax Modu87+ 700W (M) *


Between 701W and 800W
Rosewill Capstone 750W (M) *
Corsair AX750 (M) *
Corsair HX750 (M) *
Seasonic M12II 750W (M) *
Seasonic X-750 (M) *
Rosewill Tachyon 750W (M) *
XFX 750W Black Edition (M) *
Corsair TX750 v2 (M) *
Silverstone Strider Plus 750W (M)
Antec High Current Pro 750W (M)
Silverstone Strider Gold Evolution 750W (M)
Corsair GS800 (M)


Between 801W-900W
Corsair TX850M (M) *
Seasonic X-850 (M) *
XFX 850W Black Edition (M) *
Corsair HX850 (M) *
Antec High Current Pro 850W (M)
Seasonic P-860 Platinum (M) *
Corsair AX850 (M) *
Silverstone Strider Plus 850W (M)

901W and above
Corsair HX1050 (M) *
Seasonic X-1050 (M) *
Antec Quattro 1200W (M)
Corsair AX1200 (M) *
Corsair AX1200i (M) *
Seasonic X-1250 (M) *
Enermax MAXREVO 1500W (M) *
Rosewill Hercules 1600W (M)



Please contribute to this section if possible.

This post has been edited by chocobo7779: Dec 11 2012, 09:47 PM
chocobo7779
post Dec 9 2012, 11:43 AM

Power is nothing without control
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About some power supply brands
Here, I'm going to describe some common PSU brands.

About Aerocool
OEM: Andyson (Strike-X), HEC/Compucase (V series /E85/E80 series)

» Click to show Spoiler - click again to hide... «


About E85/E80
The E85/E80 PSUs are a series of PSUs with modular cabling (again, semi-modular) with 80+ Bronze efficiency (The latter does not have modular cabling nor 80+ certification). Those are Aerocool's entry level PSUs.

Verdict
Unfortunately, the E85Ms exhibited failed voltage regulation test, albeit the ripple was within specs and almost touching the ATX limit. The E80s may fare better as an entry-level unit, but the cable configuration isn't ideal for a 600W unit.

Reviews
E85M 550
E80-600

This post has been edited by chocobo7779: Mar 31 2013, 05:45 PM
NoobHacker
post Dec 9 2012, 11:57 AM

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i didnt read everyword of your guide but seems you didn't answer how much wattage is enough for my rig hmm.gif
maybe put some calculating tutorial like
processor - google TDP , or with overclock
graphic card - google TDP , or with overclock, maybe +20%
add 150W to other components,then thats wattage you need
chocobo7779
post Dec 9 2012, 11:59 AM

Power is nothing without control
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QUOTE(NoobHacker @ Dec 9 2012, 11:57 AM)
i didnt read everyword of your guide but seems you didn't answer how much wattage is enough for my rig  hmm.gif
maybe put some calculating tutorial like
processor - google TDP , or with overclock
graphic card - google TDP , or with overclock, maybe +20%
add 150W to other components,then thats wattage you need
*
Well, I'm including it in the next section of my post, for clarity purposes. tongue.gif
DeepMemory
post Dec 9 2012, 12:04 PM

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Good job there, but need to clean it up abit and also wall of text for newbies.
WiLeKiyO
post Dec 9 2012, 12:04 PM

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MOD Pin this ! Well done TS !
primaroti
post Dec 9 2012, 12:14 PM

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well done bro!!!...this easy for who want learn about PSU...
kuanzc
post Dec 9 2012, 12:39 PM

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IINM, CPU and GPU are the only one that utilize +12V rail whereas +5v are for optical drives and HDD. Not quite sure about +3.3V rail though.
As for (-) rails, nowadays, there aren't much hardware that utilize it.
Anyhow, I am not quite sure regarding these. Sorry if any info is wrong.

Maybe you could use some spoiler to make it more neat and organize. Just a suggestion though.
nerdlessguy
post Dec 9 2012, 03:52 PM

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Nice update,and advise are taken rclxms.gif nice chart by the way,draw it yourself?
arerife
post Dec 9 2012, 03:56 PM

so far away
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BAD PSU link
http://www.johnnylucky.org/power-supplies/...lemon-list.html
chocobo7779
post Dec 9 2012, 07:15 PM

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QUOTE(nerdlessguy @ Dec 9 2012, 03:52 PM)
Nice update,and advise are taken rclxms.gif nice chart by the way,draw it yourself?
*
Nope. wink.gif


Added on December 9, 2012, 7:16 pm
QUOTE(kuanzc @ Dec 9 2012, 12:39 PM)
IINM, CPU and GPU are the only one that utilize +12V rail whereas +5v are for optical drives and HDD. Not quite sure about +3.3V rail though.
As for (-) rails, nowadays, there aren't much hardware that utilize it.
Anyhow, I am not quite sure regarding these. Sorry if any info is wrong.

Maybe you could use some spoiler to make it more neat and organize. Just a suggestion though.
*
Updated with spoilers. wink.gif



This post has been edited by chocobo7779: Dec 9 2012, 07:54 PM
chocobo7779
post Dec 9 2012, 07:54 PM

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Joined: Sep 2010
Picking the right power supply according to your PC specifications
Now we get into something most people will ask.
How many watts do I need for this?
Well, to start it off, consider using this formula:

(Processor TDP)+(GPU TDP x number of GPUs)+(100W)

This will provide a rough image of which PSU you should use. wink.gif

Examples:
Let's say I'm building a rig with a 3570K and a HD7950.
My formula would look something like this:
77W+200W+100W=427W
Hence, I would need a 450-500W PSU.
Do bear in mind that does not account CPU and GPU overclocking.
If you wish to overclock your CPU and GPU, add around 100-150W for OC headroom.

But how about if I want to build a rig with a 3930K and 2 HD7970s in Crossfire?
My formula would look like this:
130W+(210x2)W+100W=650W
Again, add 100-150W for overclocking headroom.
You will need at least 750-800W for this setup.

If you are overclocking your CPU and GPU real hard, you may need more PSU juice, thats for sure. tongue.gif

Another option to calculate your power consumption of your setup is by the use of PSU calculators

http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalc...e.jsp#footnote5

Just pick the hardware you wish to setup, and the calculator will calculate one for you.
Do bear in mind that you do not need to adhere to the values strictly; it's recommended to go a bit more for some headroom.

There's another PSU calculator as well, and this is a program written by Phaedrus2129.
http://www.overclock.net/t/1140534/psu-calc-final-release
Credits to Phaedrus2129@Overclock.net
This one is even more comprehensive. Just input your system information and it will produce a list of recommended PSUs for your build.
WiLeKiyO
post Dec 9 2012, 08:05 PM

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Apprieciate a lot man, Now I know how to explain what's the real function of PSU to my newbie friends.

Now we need newbie guide to CPU. thumbup.gif

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