Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

Outline · [ Standard ] · Linear+

> between elken and coway water filter, between this two which is you all prefer

views
     
Optiplex330
post Oct 15 2012, 12:04 AM

10k Club
********
Senior Member
12,696 posts

Joined: Aug 2008
World Health Organization has recommended not to use Reverse Osmosis water for drinking. AFAIK, Elken is R.O.
Optiplex330
post Oct 15 2012, 12:20 AM

10k Club
********
Senior Member
12,696 posts

Joined: Aug 2008
QUOTE(jipeng @ Oct 15 2012, 12:05 AM)
ooo..really? this is the first time i heard that actually.
*
You can read about it here. Distilled and R.O. water are also called dematerialized water.

http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health...mineralized.pdf
Optiplex330
post May 13 2013, 11:20 AM

10k Club
********
Senior Member
12,696 posts

Joined: Aug 2008
QUOTE(DanielW @ May 13 2013, 03:12 AM)
Kozisek mentioned that this is a draft document and not for citation. Therefore, this document is subjected to review and further correction/editing. You should give the completed version instead: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health...trientsindw/en/ or http://www.who.int/entity/water_sanitation...trientsindw.pdf

I find that some of Kozisek statements often quoted from research studies which are not conclusive in evidence that drinking RO/demineralised water is bad for health, especially epidemiological studies. Most of the sickness, such as heart disease, osteoporosis and cancer also happens to individuals who doesn't drink RO water. Other factors could have cause these common illnesses.

I encourage you to read this document from WQA: http://www.wqa.org/pdf/Consumer%20Briefs/LowTDS.pdf
This document commented on the research done by Sidorenko and Rachmanin of Russia where the scientific methods used are questionable and the conclusions made are vague or not supported by data. Interestingly, Kozisek's WHO document also quotes the same Sidorenko & Rachmanin report.

In another statement, Kozisek states Nevertheless, severe acute damage, such as hyponatremic shock or delirium, may occur following intense physical efforts and ingestion of several litres of low-mineral water (Basnyat et al.2000). The so-called "water intoxication" (hyponatremic shock) may also occur with rapid ingestion of excessive amounts not only of low-mineral water but also tap water. The "intoxication" risk increases with
decreasing levels of TDS. In the past, acute health problems were reported in mountain climbers who had prepared their beverages with melted snow that was not supplemented with necessary ions. A more severe course of such a condition coupled with brain oedema, convulsions and metabolic acidosis was reported in infants whose drinks had been prepared with distilled or low-mineral bottled water (CDC 1994)."

If you read the original paper ( http://download.journals.elsevierhealth.co...03200707836.pdf ) you will notice that there is no mention of drinking "low-mineral water" by the patient but excessive drinking of water (10 L of water without eating any salt-containing food supplementation for that day and taking part in a rigorous trek in a hot and humid environment, which resulted in profuse sweating) which causes water intoxication.

Kozisek also wrongly intepreted CDC 1994 report ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00032470.htm ) as "infants whose drinks had been prepared with distilled or low-mineral bottled water". No such case mentioned in the original CDC 1994 report. Instead, the original report mentioned that the infants were given tap water or bottled water as a substitute for infant formula before hospitalization. Doctors always advise us not to give 0-6 months babies too much water, just a few sip to wash the mouth will do. The reported cases in the CDC 1994 report has nothing to do with distilled or low-mineral bottled water. Even drinking tap water excessively can cause hyponatremic seizures in babies!

I suspect either Kozisek lacks critical thinking in his study of research papers, or has poor mastery of English (he's a Russian) or drunk while writing his WHO document tongue.gif https://www.facebook.com/frantisek.kozisek/...antisek.kozisek
*
R.O. home water treatment are not cheap. In fact, pretty expensive. So I see no point in using such system when other systems which does not remove minerals exist.

Optiplex330
post May 13 2013, 05:38 PM

10k Club
********
Senior Member
12,696 posts

Joined: Aug 2008
QUOTE(DanielW @ May 13 2013, 03:00 PM)
I agree that RO system is not cheap. The cheapest in the Malaysian market that I've seen priced around RM2000.

Usually a non-RO water purifier company will tell you that their system can filter harmful contaminants and retain good minerals in the water. This is only half truth.

Chemicals are generally categorized into organic chemical or inorganic chemical. To know which chemical is organic or inorganic, you can Google the name of the chemical and if the chemical structure has a carbon atom or 'C' in it, then it's an organic chemical.

Good minerals are in the form of inorganic chemical. If a water purifier system allows good minerals to bypass, logically it also allows other inorganic contaminants to bypass. Most of the system in the market I've seen which allow good minerals to bypass are activated carbon filter. Organic contaminants contain carbon molecules which can bond to the activated carbon filter. A well designed activated carbon filter can filter organic chemicals and some inorganic chemical such as chlorine, lead and mercury. The disadvantage of activated carbon filter is it's not effective in removing most inorganic contaminants such as arsenic, nitrate, or heavy metals like chromium and cadmium. RO membrane can filter these inorganic contaminants. Most RO system also have pre- and post-activated carbon filter to filter organic contaminants. So a well designed RO system can filter both organic and inorganic contaminants.

There is no filter in the market which can differentiate between good minerals and bad minerals. This is a marketing gimmick. If the filter can retain good minerals in the water, chances are it also retains other inorganic chemicals in the water.

I do not deny the fact that some minerals in the water are essential to our health such as calcium and magnesium. Individuals who does not maintain a healthy diet can benefit from the calcium and magnesium content in the water to prevent certain illnesses. For those who drink RO water, the lack of minerals in the water can be supplemented from food intake. http://www.iwawaterwiki.org/xwiki/bin/view...les/RO_Minerals

Between a choice of drinking filtered water containing good minerals plus inorganic contaminants, or RO water which doesn't contain organic and inorganic contaminants while lacking good minerals, I personally choose RO water and supplement the minerals from food and nutrient supplement intake. A glass of milk contains more calcium than a glass of water.

The are some precautions on drinking RO water though:
1) Don't fill RO water in plastic bottle because of leaching effect. It's best to fill RO water in glass or stainless steel bottle.
2) It's not recommended to drink RO water immediately after exercise. Better drink 100plus to replenish the salt lost through sweats.
3) Maintain a healthy diet or take nutrient supplements if you're to drink RO water.

*
Too troublesome. And the fact that you need to take nutrient supplement shows it's not the most healthy of water to take.

Then there is the issue of not knowing when to replace the membrane otherwise the membrane will be a perfect bed for bacteria to grow. I prefer an unit that has some sort of measuring meter to inform me when the filter need changing.

As to what can be filtered, just go check it out at National Sanitation Foundation website to see what could be filtered.

My 2 sen.






Optiplex330
post May 15 2013, 04:24 PM

10k Club
********
Senior Member
12,696 posts

Joined: Aug 2008
QUOTE(DanielW @ May 14 2013, 12:24 AM)

Both Elken and Coway have after sales service to help remind customer of the need to change the filter. So this is not an issue, unless you buy RO system from other brand or DIY type. Still even if it's DIY type, you can always make a reminder on your smartphone everytime you changed the filters. So not really a big issue for me.

I agree that NSF certification is important, or at least a WQA certification and check the website to see what could be filtered.
*
How do they do that? AFAIK, filter are certified to filter x litres of water. Sure a family of 10 uses up x litre faster than a family of 2 person. So how do they know how much water had been filtered? Without knowing, there is no way these sales service can know when need changing?



Bump Topic Add ReplyOptions New Topic
 

Change to:
| Lo-Fi Version
0.0205sec    1.12    6 queries    GZIP Disabled
Time is now: 25th July 2021 - 04:59 PM