Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

Outline · [ Standard ] · Linear+

> The Guitar Dictionary, What's a Strat ? LP ? Describe 'Em All (Guitars)

views
     
TheWhacker
post Jun 24 2005, 10:28 AM

Newbie
Group Icon
Sports Channel, Football Lounge, Musicians
Group: Moderator
Posts: 3,914

Joined: Jan 2005



Why all electric guitar wan ? .... Acoustic guitars can right ? ... i mean it's the "guitar Paradise" ....


How Body Shapes Affect Tone Production
Well .... the bigger the guitar, the louder it will sound (huh!) and, consequently, the body width and depth will produce more bass response. The difference between all these guitars is the depth of the body. Their scale lengths are standard 25.3" (643mm)

_____________________________________________________________________

Model: GJ46SCE (Jumbo Guitar)
Brand: Fender
Body Depth: 3.87" (Front) to 4.87" (Rear)
Nickname: Big Mama guitar, Jumbo

user posted image

With bodies approximately 17 inches wide and 5 inches deep, jumbos are the cannons of the acoustic guitar world. Typically made with backs and sides of maple to recover clarity in the tonal spectrum ... wah .... These huge guitars can certainly fill a room, at alone a hall with sound.
But ... haha, guitars of this size and power are usually harder to record with, so, most players will choose smaller bodied instruments to make recordings and will leave the jumbos for their live performance.
Most jumbos are made of rosewood which produces a more mellow tone than maple and rosewood are very popular for their power and rich resonance.


_____________________________________________________________________

Steel-string guitars with body widths from approximately 14 inches to 16 inches fall into categories known as
i) Concert
ii) Grand concert
iii) Auditorium
iv) Grand Auditorium

Model: GDC 100 SCE (Florentine Cutaway) Concert Guitar GC12
Brand: Fender
Body Depth: 3.62" (Front) to 4.40" (Rear)
Nickname: Folk guitar, concert

user posted image

Model: GC12
Brand: Fender
Body Depth: 3.5" Front, 4" Rear
Nickname: Folk guitar, Grand Concert

user posted image

The smaller concert and grand concert sizes accentuate the middle and upper end of the frequency range and because they lack deep bass response, these guitars are usually built with mahogany or rosewood back and sides to give them an extra warmer, better balanced tone. Keep in mind about maple bodies as these tend to be too bright and harsh.


_____________________________________________________________________

Model: GA43SCE
Brand: Fender
Body Depth: 4" (Front) to 5" (Rear)
Nickname: Grand Auditorium

user posted image

Mid-sized Auditorium and grand Auditorium models bring the widest palette of frequencies and tone colours to the mix because all types of tonewood, various scale lengths and decorative appointment are used in these categories, along with many variations in body shape. These body sizes are generally believed to be the best guitar for tonal balance, clarity of individual notes and blend of chord structures. These guitars are the favorites of modern finger-style players.


_____________________________________________________________________

Model: DG10
Brand: Fender
Body Depth: 3.94" (100mm) to 4.92" (125mm)
Nickname: Dreadnought Guitar, "acoustic guitar"

user posted image

Little history lesson for you guys. This body shape took its name from a battleship that was used during the early 1900s which is also known to be wide across it's mid section. The overall shape has been described as rectangular with a soft waist curve yielding a large soundboard and strong tone character across the full sound spectrum but emphasizing the low-mid range.
These near-jumbo sized instruments have dominated the acoustic guitar world since the 1930s and no matter whom the manufacturer, the width, length and depth of the body are fairly standardized with only a few exceptions. Hundreds of thousands of dreadnoughts are sold in the world each year and have in fact become what most people think of when you go to a guitar store and say "acoustic guitar"


_____________________________________________________________________

Please correct me if any of these info is wrong .... blush.gif, Coz i did my own research before i bought my Dreadnought and this all the research i did

This post has been edited by TheWhacker: Jun 24 2005, 10:30 AM
TheWhacker
post Mar 1 2006, 11:33 PM

Newbie
Group Icon
Sports Channel, Football Lounge, Musicians
Group: Moderator
Posts: 3,914

Joined: Jan 2005




Fender Stratocaster (credit to led_zep_freak, Wikipedia and Fender)

user posted image


Model: Stratocaster
Brand: Fender
Nickname: Strat
Genre: Blues, Rock & basically everything else too (Strats are very versatile!).

What ?

The Stratocaster is a model of electric guitar designed by Leo Fender in the early 1950s, and manufactured continuously to the present. The Stratocaster has been used by many leading guitarists and on many historic recordings: Along with the Gibson Les Paul and the Strat's older cousin, the Fender Telecaster, it is one of the most enduring and common models of electric guitar in the world.


user posted image
The headstock shape of the Statocaster is actually copyrighted.
That's why other "Stratocaster" copies cannot replicate its recognizable shape exactly.



The Stratocaster has been widely copied, such that 'Stratocaster' or 'Strat' can also denote a type of guitar, by various manufacturers, showing the same general features as the original (see strat copy). However, in many jurisdictions the word 'Stratocaster' is reserved for Fender guitars.

Where did it come from ?

The Fender Electric Instrument Manufacturing Company (now known as Fender Musical Instruments Corporation) developed the first commercial solid-body 'Spanish' (as opposed to 'Hawaiian,' or lap steel) electric guitar in the Telecaster, a simple design whose earliest models were offered under various names like Broadcaster or simply Esquire, beginning in 1950. Though the Telecaster and its variants were successful, many guitar players of the day insisted on using a Bigsby unit, a fairly primitive spring-loaded vibrato device with which players could bend notes up and down with their pick hand. Instead of adding a Bigsby, Fender decided to produce a new, more expensively-made ash or alder line of guitars with his own design of vibrato (see tremolo arm for more on the evolution of such mechanisms). His decision was also influenced by guitarists Rex Gallion and Bill Carson, who requested a contoured body to temper the harsh edges of the slab-built Telecaster; the new ash body design was based on that of the 1951 Precision Bass.


user posted image
Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock with a 1969 Stratocaster, a right-handed
model played left-handed, with the strings in the standard order relative to the guitarist.



The name, 'Stratocaster,' was intended to evoke images of newly emergent jet-aircraft technology (such as the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress), and to express Fender's modernistic design philosophy. In designing the Stratocaster's body, a significant area of the back of the guitar, and the area where the strumming arm rests, were beveled to accommodate the player's chest and arm. The upper bouts featured two cutaways, for easier access to the higher frets. The new 'Custom Contour Body' and 'Synchronized Tremolo' bridge made the Stratocaster a revolutionary design. The guitar also featured more complex electronics than the Telecaster: three single coil pickups, each with staggered magnetic poles; a three-way selector switch; one volume knob, and two tone controls. (A three single-coil pickup design was an innovation already in use by Gibson in their ES-5 model since 1949. However, Fender's pickups were much more compact.)

How about it's sound and playability ?

Much of the popularity of the Stratocaster can be attributed to its versatility. The neck, middle, and bridge (in the original manual, labelled "rhythm", "normal tone", and "lead", respectively) pickups provide a wide range of tones. The standard singlecoil pickups often found in Stratocasters produce a trebly sound with a high top end and bell-like harmonics. The Stratocaster has been used for a variety of purposes, from the classic "Fender twang" to the slicing solos of Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton to the fat, crunching tones in Ritchie Blackmore's "Smoke on the Water".

Is the Design and popularity still the same ?

In 1959-1967, the Stratocaster was refitted with a rosewood fretboard, as well as color choices other than sunburst, including a variety of colorful car-like paint jobs that appealed to the nascent surfer and hot-rod culture, pioneered by such bands as the Ventures and the Beach Boys. d*** Dale, the godfather of surf-rock, was a prominent Stratocaster player who also collaborated with Leo Fender in developing the Fender Showman amplifier. In the early 60's, the instrument was also championed by Hank Marvin - guitarist of the Shadows, a band which originally backed Cliff Richard and then produced instrumentals of its own. So distinctive was the Hank Marvin sound that many musicians - including the Beatles - initially deliberately avoided the Stratocaster and chose other marques. However, by 1965, George Harrison and John Lennon of the Beatles both acquired Stratocasters at about the time of the Rubber Soul recording sessions. It was Jimi Hendrix who widely popularized its use once again in the late 1960s.

The one-piece maple neck was discontinued in 1959; however, a maple neck with a glued-on maple fretboard was offered as an option in 1967. The rosewood fretboard over maple neck remained as the other neck option. In 1969, one-piece maple necks were again offered.


user posted image
Eric Clapton plays his signature model
at the Tsunami Relief concert, January 22nd 2005.



Many artists (including Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, and Mark Knopfler) discovered that the pickup selector could be lodged in between the basic three settings for further tonal variety; since 1977, Stratocasters have been fitted with a five-way switch to make such switching more stable. Other, often subtle changes were made to the guitars over the years, as though in the spirit of tinkering for which Leo Fender was famous, but the basic shape and features of the Strat remained unchanged. In the 1980's some popular guitarists began modifying their Stratocasters with a humbucker pickup in the bridge position. This was intended to provide a more suitable sound for the heavier music of the day. The popularity of this modification grew and ultimately Fender began releasing factory built models with a bridge humbucker option.

Players first perceived a loss of the initial high quality of Fender guitars after the CBS takeover in 1965. So-called 'pre-CBS' Stratocasters are, accordingly, extremely sought-after and expensive. In recent times, original 1954 to 1958 Stratocasters have sold for more than $75,000. Many now reside in Japan, cached away as collectible pieces of Americana.


user posted image
TheWhacker tongue.gif, with a 70's Stratocaster, playing at a
Tsunami Relief concert St.Andrews, April 2005



The Stratocaster fell out of fashion in the mid-sixties, to the point where the Fender company (Leo Fender had sold it to CBS for $13 million in January 1965) reduced its price and considered removing it from their production line. However, Jimi Hendrix and many other blues-influenced artists of the late '60s soon adopted the Stratocaster as their main instrument, reviving the guitar's popularity. Both George Harrison and Eric Clapton used Stratocasters in the 1971 Concert For Bangladesh, giving the Strat additional high visibilty in rock circles.

After a peak in the 1970s, driven by players such as David Gilmour of Pink Floyd, Eric Clapton, and Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits, another lull occurred in the early '80s. During that time, CBS-Fender cut costs by deleting features from the standard Stratocaster line, despite a blues revival that featured Strat players such as Stevie Ray Vaughan, Robert Cray, and Buddy Guy. (Buddy Guy had actually been a Strat player since the mid-1960s, and is sometimes credited with influencing Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, and Stevie Ray Vaughan in their choice of the Stratocaster as a primary blues-rock guitar.) However, this lull abated once the company became independent of CBS, and a rise in mainstream popularity for vintage (and vintage-style) instruments resulted.

This post has been edited by TheWhacker: Aug 21 2006, 07:37 PM
TheWhacker
post Mar 1 2006, 11:40 PM

Newbie
Group Icon
Sports Channel, Football Lounge, Musicians
Group: Moderator
Posts: 3,914

Joined: Jan 2005




Fender Telecaster (credit to led_zep_freak, Wikipedia and Fender)

user posted image


Model: Telecaster
Brand: Fender
Nickname: Tele
Genre: Country, Blues, Rock.

What ? Another Stratcaster ?

Nope, its a Telecaster. This guitar is a dual-pickup, solid-body electric guitar made by Fender. Its simple, yet effective design and revolutionary sound broke ground and set trends in the fields of electric guitar manufacture and popular music. Introduced for national distribution as the Broadcaster in the fall of 1950, it was the first guitar of its kind to be produced on a substantial scale. Its commercial production can be traced as far back as the spring of 1950, when the single- and dual-pickup Esquire models were first sold. From that time to the present, the Telecaster has been in continuous production in one form or another, making it the world's senior solid-body electric guitar (Duchossoir, 1991, 11-15).


user posted image

Same with its Stratocaster brother, the headstock shape of the Telecaster is copyrighted too.
You'll see other other "Telecaster" copies in various shops, but cannot replicate its recognizable shape exactly.



Where did it come from ?

The Telecaster was developed by Leo Fender in Fullerton, California, in the 1940s. But like many great ideas, the solid-body electric guitar was created independently by several craftsman and companies over a similar period (roughly 1932-1949), such that any claim of a 'first' demands a great deal of qualification. Leo Fender's Telecaster was simply the right guitar at the right time, and like many other great ideas, it began as an accident.[citation needed]

Fender had an electronics repair shop called Fender's Radio Service where he first repaired, then designed, amplifiers and electromagnetic pickups for musicians -- chiefly players of electric semi-acoustic guitars, electric Hawaiian (lap steel) guitars, and mandolins. Players had been 'wiring up' their instruments in search of greater volume and projection since the late 1920s, and electric semi-acoustics (such as the Gibson ES-150) had long been widely available. Tone had never, until then, been the primary reason for a guitarist to go electric, but in 1943, when Fender and his partner, Doc Kauffman, built a crude wooden guitar as a pickup test rig, local country players started asking to borrow it for gigs. It sounded shiny and sustaining. Fender got curious, and in 1949, when it was long-understood that solid construction offered great advantages in electric instruments, but before any commercial solidbody Spanish guitars had caught on (the small Audiovox company apparently offered a modern, solidbody electric guitar as early as the mid-1930s), he built a better prototype.


user posted image

James Burton with his signature model playing at "Elvis-The Concert"



That hand-built prototype, an anomalous white guitar, had most of the features of what would become the Telecaster. It was designed in the spirit of the solid-body Hawaiian guitars manufactured by Rickenbacker -- small, simple units made of Bakelite and aluminum with the parts bolted together -- but with honest wooden construction. (Rickenbacker, then called 'Rickenbacher,' had also offered a solid Bakelite-bodied electric Spanish guitar in 1935, many details of which seem echoed in Fender's design.)

The initial production model appeared in 1950, and was called the Esquire. (Fewer than fifty guitars were originally produced under that name, and most were replaced under warranty because of early manufacturing problems.) Later in 1950, this single-pickup model was discontinued, and a two-pickup model was renamed the Broadcaster. The Gretsch company, itself a manufacturer of hollowbody electric guitars, claimed that "Broadcaster" violated the trademark for its Broadkaster line of drums, and as a newcomer to the industry, Fender decided to bend and changed the name to Telecaster, after the newly popular medium of television. (The guitars manufactured in the interim bore no name, and are now popularly called 'Nocasters.') The Esquire was reintroduced as a one-pickup Telecaster, at a lower price.

Is the sound and playability the same as the Stratocaster ?

The Telecaster is known for its bright, cutting tone. One of the secrets to the Tele's sound centers on the bridge. The strings pass through the body and are anchored at the back by six ferrules, giving solidity and sustain to the guitar's sound, but some are 'top-loading'; the strings pass through the end of and terminate at the bridge instead of going through the body. The original 3-saddle bridge resulted in good contact between the strings and the solid body, further enhancing sustain. A slanting bridge pickup enhances the guitar's treble tone. The solid body allows the guitar to deliver a clean amplified version of the strings' tone.


user posted image

Muddy Waters with a normal American Telecaster®.
He is known for inventing the first modern rock band.



This was an improvement on previous electric guitar designs, whose hollow bodies made them prone to unwanted feedback, and which sometimes suffered from a muddy, indistinct sound. These design elements allowed musicians to emulate steel guitar sounds, making it particularly useful in country music. Such emulation can be enhanced by use of a B-Bender (B-string bending device co-introduced by Clarence White), enabling a smooth change of pitch for a single string within a chord.

What's so big deal about the Telecaster ?

The Telecaster was important in the evolution of country, electric blues, rock and roll and other forms of popular music, because its solid construction allowed the guitar to be played loudly as a lead instrument, with long sustain if desired, and with less of the whistling 'hard' feedback (known in sound reinforcement circles as 'microphonic feedback') that hollowbodied instruments tend to produce at volume (a different kind than the controllable feedback later exploited by Jimi Hendrix and countless other players). Even though the Telecaster is more than half a century old, and more sophisticated designs have been coming out since the early 1950s (including Fender's own Stratocaster), the Telecaster has remained in constant production. There have been numerous variations and modifications, but a model with something close to the original features has always been available.

This post has been edited by TheWhacker: Mar 15 2006, 05:36 PM
TheWhacker
post May 1 2006, 02:21 PM

Newbie
Group Icon
Sports Channel, Football Lounge, Musicians
Group: Moderator
Posts: 3,914

Joined: Jan 2005



How to restring a floyd rose.

QUOTE(vorchiel @ Apr 28 2006, 10:43 PM)
http://www.carvinworld.com/manuals/Original-Floyd-Rose.pdf

but after i lossened the saddle lock screw, i still can not remove the string. do i need to pull it vigorously? i afraid of damaging my guitar.. or is it like that? the lock box doesnt seem to budge at all..
*
QUOTE(TheWhacker @ Apr 29 2006, 12:10 AM)
floyd rose is a very tricky setup to adjust. If you get it wrong, the whole tuning will be out.

I suggest sending to a shop to tune the guitar and see how the pro does the tuning on a floyd rose.

Send it to the shop and let the pro do it for you. I rather pay £20 then paying £200 to repair the whole bridge of guitar. Here's why ....

Once, I came across a "seasoned" guitarist who thinking he knows what hes doing .... he adjust the floyd rose bridge went up so high till the whole thing just come out from the guitar ....

After watching the pro adjust the floyd rose, go ahead and try adjust them yourself ..... if you did something wrong or you want to ask a questions, at lest he's there to help you
*
QUOTE(strife_personified @ Apr 29 2006, 01:29 AM)
might have some help for you here. had lots of fun with my floyd-rose, and i'm glad that my first teacher thought me how some tips on how to do it.

first up, dont play with the rear tremolo cavity. i've learnt from my own itchified experience not to be a bum and do things without knowing what i was doing in the first place.

what you want to do is get a nice hard piece of card board that is longer than the breadth of the Floyd-rose (thereafter refered to as FR). now, using the tremolo arm, pull it so that the strings start to slack, and lodge the cardboard behind the FR, so that it stays at that height when you let go of the tremolo arm.

now, follow the pdf guide that you posted, remove all the strings, and all that stuff. thats all the same, so i wont repeat it here.

lastly, with the cardboard still in place, tune the strings till they are nearly fully tuned but not fully yet, then test the tension by removing the cardboard, and SLOWLY easing the FR back into its normal position.

now, i dont know if this is orthodox, but i generally tune the strings over and over til the ride height is correct, and its in tune, since what usually happens is that you tune the sixth string, then by the time you get to the first string, the sixth is out.

one method that i sometimes use is to tune the first and sixth together, since they are both E. then tune the other strings, while playing the sixth and first strings at the same time as a point of reference. once its generally in tune, lock the tune lock if you're lucky enough to have that, and fine tune the harmonics out with the FR itself.

hope that helps wink.gif and saves you 15 quid as well.

Lastly, to answer your actual question, you could try spraying a little WD40 into the lock box, just make sure that you don't drown it. try pushing it a bit with a screwdriver, those bums do tend to get stuck.

also, you can sometimes try to time your guitar string changes with your servicing schedule, so that way they can do it all at once. saves a lot of hassle sometimes.

PS: Thanks for the pdf manual. i've definitely learned a bit more from that than my experimenting.
*
QUOTE(Reload @ Apr 29 2006, 01:44 AM)
Floyd Rose setup is hard, but changing strings isn't really, once you've done it a couple of times.

Have you loosened the saddle lock screws enough? The lock block should be loose inside the lock box. (Not too loose, you don't want it to fall out.) You shouldn't need to pull too hard on the strings to remove them from the saddle.

Those are quite good instructions, actually, so you should trust them.

One more thing...instead of blocking your tremolo with the cardboard as described above, you can just change your strings one at a time. Of course, this means you can't clean the fretboard, but do you want to?

Good luck.
*
QUOTE(strife_personified @ Apr 29 2006, 01:49 AM)
i'd say clean the fretboard. doesnt hurt to polish the frets with some mild metal cleaner, and the wood as well. but do correct me if i'm wrong and it isnt actually good to do that.

but then again, it IS your first restringing, so your guitar is most likely in good shape, so you might still want to consider Reload's advice.
*
QUOTE(Reload @ Apr 29 2006, 02:01 AM)
I always, always clean the fretboard and the frets when I change strings, so I block my trem. But that's just because I'm fussy.  thumbup.gif

By the way, you can block your trem with almost anything. I use a wood block or a couple of bottlecaps. Just make sure that whatever you use won't scratch anything. When in doubt, coat with masking tape.

And use WD40 sparingly, because it's really hard to clean up from all the crevices of  the bridge and makes everything feel icky.
*
QUOTE(Everdying @ Apr 29 2006, 04:55 AM)
yea i tune mine the same way strife_personified said.
only instead of cardboard i stick a cloth under it, normally some old tshirt.

awhile ago someone actually invented some small plastic device just to specially stick under the floyd, forgot what it was called, but its definitely a waste of money.

and yea, i always clean and condition my fretboard with every string change.
*
More information: Stringing a Floyd Rose (with pictures)

This post has been edited by TheWhacker: May 1 2006, 02:25 PM
TheWhacker
post May 22 2006, 02:51 PM

Newbie
Group Icon
Sports Channel, Football Lounge, Musicians
Group: Moderator
Posts: 3,914

Joined: Jan 2005



All unnecessary posts have been deleted. This is the forum's Guitar Dictionary, so post something that's is important for all of us to read and refer to.


-Posts Deleted-


 

Switch to:
| Lo-Fi Version
0.0781sec    1.87    6 queries    GZIP Disabled
Time is now: 22nd July 2019 - 11:54 PM