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> Explanation Of Chinese Ghost / Spirit / God, An Explanations Of Ghost / Spirit / God

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TSHeibaiwuchang
post May 7 2010, 08:26 PM, updated 13y ago

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Bardo / 中陰身

In Mahayana Buddhism a state of soul after death before reincarnation, usually within 49 days. But if died unnaturally (枉死), or with strong thoughts may become “You Hun Ye Gui” and reincarnate later or not reincarnate, such as “Diao Si Gui”, “Shui Gui” and “Yuan Gui”.


Jibakurei / 地縛霊

A ghost that is bound to a certain place, love about his land before death or tomb, some of them are “Diao Shi Gui”, “Shui Gui “ and “ Yuan Gui” died unnaturally.


Ba Jiao Gui / 芭蕉鬼

A female ghost which dwells in a banana tree and appears wailing under the tree at night, sometimes carrying a baby. In some folk tales from Thailand, Singaporeand Malaysia, some greedy people ask for lottery numbers from the ghost in hope of winning money. They tie a red string around the tree trunk and stick sharp needles into it and then tie the other end of the string to his/her bed. At night, the ghost appears and begs the person to set her free in return for winning lottery numbers. If the person does not full fill his/her promise to set the ghost free after winning the lottery, he/she will meet with a horrifying death. This ghost is often likened to the Pontianak from Malay folklore.


Diao Si Gui / 吊死鬼

The spirits of those who have been hanged, either in execution or suicides. They are usually shown with long red tongues sticking out.


Er Gui /饿鬼

A hungry ghost which usually appears during the Hungry Ghost Festival. The ghost is the spirit of a person who has committed sins of greed while he/she was alive and condemned to suffer in hunger after death. The ghost has a mouth which is too small for ingesting food and is covered with green or grey skin, sometimes with a potbelly as well. The ghost suffers from malnutrition and insatiable hunger. It haunts the streets and kitchens, searching for food offerings and decomposed food to satisfy its hunger. These hungry ghosts consume anything that can satisfy their hunger, including excreted waste and rotten flesh. There are various types of hungry ghosts. Some of them have fire-breathing abilities while others suffer from anorexia.


Gui Po / 鬼婆

A ghost which takes the form of a kind and friendly old woman. They may be the spirits of Amahs who used to work as servants in rich families. They return to help their masters with housekeeping matters or to take care of young children and babies. Some may have hideous appearances and look hostile like witches infairy tales.


Shu Gui / 树鬼

Spirits which live in trees. They confuse travellers by appearing in random locations, especially in forests. Although the spirit does not appear to the living in its human form, the mere appearance of a tree itself at night evokes feelings of fear in a person. Hence there exists the popular sayings that one should not look up at a tree at night for fear of seeing something supernatural. A modern variation of the “Shu Gui” is the "Gui Lui" (鬼路) where travellers are drawn into an endless journey along a never-ending road.


Jiāng Shī / 僵屍

The Chinese "vampire" which literally means "stiff corpse". In fact, it behaves more like a zombie rather than a vampire. They are reanimated corpses which move by hopping and kill living beings to absorb their "life essence". They arise when the soul of the dead fails to leave the corpse due to improper death or simply out of mischief. Mostly of them were digging out by the “ Black Priest “ or we called it “ Bomoh “ for their own use.


Nu Gui / 女鬼

A vengeful female ghost with long hair in a white dress. In folklore this ghost is the spirit of a woman who commits suicide while wearing a red dress. She usually meets with some injustice, such as being wronged or sexually abused, while she was alive. She returns to take her revenge. A tabloid story tells of a funeral ceremony where family members of a murder victim dress her in red, hoping that her spirit would return to take revenge on her murderer. In traditional folklore, the colour red symbolises anger and vengeance when applied to ghosts. On the other hand, some ancient folk tales tell of beautiful female ghosts who seduce men and suck their "Yang" essence or sometimes kill them. This type of female ghost is likened to the Western Succubus. Paradoxically, a vengeful male ghost (“Nan Gui “ 男鬼) is rarely depicted.


Re Ben Gui Bin / 日本鬼兵

The spirits of Japanese soldiers who died during the Second World War. Although these ghosts are not "Chinese" in nature, they specifically appear only in modern Chinese ghost stories. These ghosts are usually seen dressed in military uniforms and carrying rifles, or Katanas for officers. The Chinese, especially those who suffered during the Japanese occupation of eastern China and Southeast Asia during the War, see Japanese soldiers as brutal killers of countless civilians. The appearance of this ghost evokes feelings of loneliness, death, cruelty, torment and fear.


Shui Gui / 水鬼

Literally means "water ghost". They are usually the spirits of those who drowned and continue living in the water. They attack unsuspecting victims by dragging them underwater and drowning them in order to take possession of the victim's body. This is known as "Ti Shen” ( 替身), which means to "replace the body", as the spirit will now return to the living in the victim's body, whereas the victim's spirit becomes the new "water ghost" and seeks to return to the living again. The cycle repeats constantly.


Wu Tou Gui / 无头鬼

Headless ghosts who roam about aimlessly. They are usually the spirits of those who have been sentenced to execution by beheading. In some popular tales, these ghosts approach the living at night and ask where their heads are. Sometimes they are shown as carrying their severed heads on their side.


You Hun Ye Gui / 游魂野鬼

The wandering spirits of the dead. They roam the world of the living during the Hungry Ghost Festival for a month. They include vengeful spirits who take their revenge, hungry ghosts and playful spirits who may cause trouble during that period. Some of them have no relatives to look after them after death, some have no respect place to go and some lose their way and are unable to return to the Underworld so they continue roaming the world of the living even after that month. They have other names such as You Ying Gong (有應公). Some scholars classify them. The Chinese proverb "Gu Hun Ye Gui" (孤魂野鬼), which describes these spirits, is used as a reference to those who wander around aimlessly. Some of may become good and powerful Wang Ye


Yuan Gui / 冤鬼

The spirits of those who have died wrongful deaths. The idea appeared very early on in China. Their spirits cannot rest in peace and go to the Underworld for reincarnation. They roam the world of the living as depressed and restless spirits who constantly seek to have their grievances redressed. In some popular tales, the spirits would approach a kind living person and attempt to communicate with them in order to lead the person to clues which point out that they have died wrongful deaths. The living person would then help them clear their name or otherwise ensure that justice is done.


Ying Ling / 嬰靈

The spirits of those who have died before birth as a human. They purportedly originated from Japan but most of the memorial service are held for them in Taiwan.



Jian / 聻

Some reported ghosts would reincarnate. Some said they would become Jian and ghosts are afraid of Jian like people afraid of ghosts. Some said the idea developed from a Fulu.


Zhi Ren / 纸人

Dolls made from paper which are burnt as offerings to the dead to become their servants. These dolls usually come in a pair of a male and a female, known as "Jin Tong Yu Nu" (金童玉女), which translates to "Golden Boy and Jade Girl". These dolls are not exactly spirits by themselves but they can appear to do the bidding of their deceased master.


Hei Bai Wu Chang / 黑白无常

These are the Black Guard of Impermanence and White Guard of Impermanence- guards of Hell who are tasked to lead the spirits of the dead to the Underworldafter death. The White Guard and the Black Guard are in charge of evil and good spirits respectively. They are worshipped in some Chinese temples and are colloquially referred to as "Da Ye Bo" (大爷伯) and "Er Ye Bo" (二爷伯), which means "Great Grand-Elder" and "Second Grand Elder" respectively. They wear tall hats bearing Chinese characters and long robes which cover their entire bodies. They carry seals on their right hands and sticks with pieces of cloth on their left hands. In some tales, they appear during the Hungry Ghost Festival and reward the good by granting them pieces of gold. Statues of them in temples depict them as having ferocious snarls on their faces and with long red tongues sticking out to scare away evil spirits. They are called General Fan and General Xie or 7th master and 8th master. The White Wuchang is called "Xie Bi-An 謝必安". He is tall and skinny, and people call him "Qi-Ye 七爺 (7th master)". The Black Wuchang is called "Fan Wu-jiu, 范無救". He is short and fat, and people call him "Ba-Ye 八爺 (8th master)". It was said that they were policemen in ancient time. During a prisoner transfer, they lost the prisoner, so they decided to split up to search for the prisoner. They planned to meet up under the Bridge. However, it was raining hard, and Xie Bi-an did not make it in time. Fan Wujiu was waiting under the Bridge for a long time and dared not leave. Eventually, Fan was drowned when the flood came. When Xie arrived and saw Fan was dead, he killed himself by hanging. Afterwards, the Heavenly Emperor saw that they were loyal to their duties and each other, so he appointed them gods to pick up dead people's spirits. There are supposed spiritual meanings about their names. "Xie Bi-an" means that one would be saved if one sacrifice to the gods (酬"謝 Xie"神明) or repent ("謝 Xie" 罪悔過). "Fan Wu-jiu" means if one committed sins (Fan zui "犯"罪), one would not be saved (Wu-jiu 無救).


Niu Tou Ma Mian / 牛头马面

Guards of the Underworld similar to the "Hei Bai Wu Chang" originating from the Song Dynasty tale Transmission of the Lamp (景德传灯录). They have the heads of a bull and a horse in place of human heads, hence the term "Niu Tou Ma Mian", which translates to "Bull Head and Horse Face". They carry pitchforks and chains to bind spirits. The size and weight of the chain used reflects the seriousness of the sins committed by the spirit.


Zhong Kui / 鍾馗

Traditionally regarded as a vanquisher of ghosts and evil beings, and reputedly able to command 80,000 demons, his image is often painted on household gates as a guardian spirit, as well as in places of business where high-value goods are involved.

According to folklore, Zhong Kui travelled with Du Ping (杜平), a friend from his hometown, to take part in theimperial examinations at the capital. Though Zhong achieved top honours in the exams, his title of "zhuangyuan" was stripped by the emperor because of his disfigured appearance. In anger, Zhong Kui committed suicide upon the palace steps by hurling himself against the palace gate until his head was broken. Du Ping buried him. After Zhong became king of ghosts in Hell, he returned to his hometown on the Chinese New Year's Eve. To repay Du Ping's kindness, Zhong Kui gave his younger sister in marriage to Du Ping


Gui Zhai / Toyol / 鬼仔

A small child spirit invoked by a bomoh (shaman). People normally associate the appearance of a toyol with that of a small baby, frequently that of a newly born baby walking in nakedness with a big head, small hands, clouded eyes and usually grayed skin. More accurately, it resembles a goblin. It can be seen by the naked eye without the use of magic, though they are unlikely to be spotted casually. The toyol is created from a dead human foetus using black magic. It is possible to buy a toyol from a bomoh and become his new master. The master of the toyol must keeps its tablet or amulet and care for it. He must feed it with a few drops of his blood everyday, usually through his thumb or big toe. In addition, it requires certain coaxing and attention, along with offerings. Such offerings might include candy and toys, for the toyol is essentially a child and must be kept happily entertained. According to other stories, a toyol must be fed with blood from a rooster. A person who owns a toyol uses it mainly to steal things from other people, or to do mischief. According to a well-known superstition, if money or jewellery keeps disappearing mysteriously from your house, a toyol might be responsible. One way to ward off a toyol is to place some needles under your money, for toyols are afraid of being hurt by needles. In old village tales, people keep toyols for selfish but petty gains. They use such spirits for theft, sabotage and other minor crimes. Serious crimes, like murder, are usually beyond the capability of these toyols. A person who suddenly becomes wealthy without explanation might be suspected of keeping a toyol. The toyol is kept in a jar or an urn, and hidden away in a dark place until needed. What happens at the end of the "contract" is not very clear. It could be that the tablet, along with the urn, is buried in a graveyard (with the relevant rituals), and the spirit is then laid to rest. An alternative method is to dispose of them in the sea. Or else, a toyol gets passed down in a family through the generations. This seems to suggest that once you obtain a toyol, not only are you stuck with it for the rest of your life, but all your descendants will also be condemned to own it. Although seemingly cunning, toyols are supposedly not very intelligent. It is said that they are easily deceived by marbles and sand and strands of garlic hanging on the door post or placed on certain parts of the house. The toyol will start playing with these items until it forgets its task at the intended victim's house. Money placed under mirrors has the potency to ward off toyols due to a phobia of their reflections.

ah-kow
post May 7 2010, 08:27 PM

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Gui Lo

white Caucasian that have an insatiable lust for sex and burgers.
wilsonjay
post May 7 2010, 08:28 PM

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add 1 more ching chong nip nong nong

living ghost
ah-kow
post May 7 2010, 08:29 PM

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to the chinese, any non chinese are considered as ghosts.
mecharojak
post May 7 2010, 08:31 PM

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Yau cha gui
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Omochao
post May 7 2010, 08:31 PM

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meh lan....
ah-kow
post May 7 2010, 08:31 PM

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QUOTE(mecharojak @ May 7 2010, 08:31 PM)
Yau cha gui
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thats the only edible ghost i knew rclxms.gif
^KamilskaZ^
post May 7 2010, 08:37 PM

roar...roar....
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hoho...toyol pun cina mau claim
TSHeibaiwuchang
post May 7 2010, 08:38 PM

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QUOTE(^KamilskaZ^ @ May 7 2010, 08:37 PM)
hoho...toyol pun cina mau claim
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Toyol never considered from any race as long as its a child, then may do....
DaiLagann
post May 7 2010, 08:46 PM

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true ah....
Shadow Kun
post May 7 2010, 08:49 PM

TOASTY!
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tl;dr
TSHeibaiwuchang
post May 7 2010, 08:50 PM

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QUOTE(DaiLagann @ May 7 2010, 08:46 PM)
true ah....
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I can't said its definetely true, depends on how people thinking and believing ot not.. but for me since i'm a exorcist and i said it's definetely true.. smile.gif smile.gif
quintessential
post May 7 2010, 08:51 PM

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QUOTE(ah-kow @ May 7 2010, 09:29 PM)
to the chinese, any non chinese are considered as ghosts.
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malai gui
keling gui
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oh yeah......... cool2.gif
planet69
post Oct 28 2010, 04:07 PM

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interesting...
have you ever come across a Shui Gui (水鬼) before?
what do they look like? how do they possess a person? does a possessed individual behave awkwardly?
Never heard of a story involving 'shui gui'.

What about Hei Bai Wu Chang (黑白无常) and Niu Tou Ma Mian (牛头马面)?
Which one is the real mccoy? i don't think we can have 2 versions of them.

This post has been edited by planet69: Oct 28 2010, 04:13 PM

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